artwork image
artwork image
artwork image
artwork image
artwork image
artwork image
artwork image
artwork image
artwork image

English

Yinka Shonibare MBE

Same But Different

Coline Milliard

Former Turner Prize nominee Yinka Shonibare MBE talks to Catalogue about his new project space in East London, the credit crunch, and the benefits of the Trojan horse approach.

‘I feel that art is a form of alchemy’, says Yinka Shonibare MBE. ‘You can take control of your own image, of your own life.’ He certainly has: few artists can claim to be as ubiquitous. Shonibare’s installations of headless mannequins in period costume are to be found in the best contemporary art collections worldwide, and his signature wax-printed cotton has become a genuine trademark. His largest exhibition to date recently travelled from Sydney to New York, his oversized ship-in-a-bottle sculpture will grace the Fourth Plinth in Trafalgar Square from next spring, and, when I meet him in his Mile End house, he is preparing for a solo show at Stephen Friedman opening this October. It’s a successful career, and seems a familiar one. But the continuity in Shonibare’s work has sometimes obscured the fascinating ambiguities of a practice in constant evolution. It’s time for a re-reading.

Guest Projects

‘When I was starting my career’, Shonibare remembers, ‘there were lots of temporary spaces all over London. Then property became too expensive and nobody could do it. I decided that I wanted some of this energy back.’ The result is Guest Projects, opening in September, for which the artist has devoted the ground floor of his newly acquired studio to exhibitions and other experimental ventures. Shonibare says that he sees Guest Projects as an extension of his own work, a way to stay in touch with up-and-coming artists and perhaps also to sidestep an industry that for the last ten years has increasingly concentrated on prêt-a-porter artworks. ‘People can’t continue focusing only on finished objects’, warns the artist. ‘They have to give money for research and development, otherwise everything will be dead.’

Following on from Three by Three – a programme of exhibitions shown in the building before refurbishment – Guest Projects is designed to function according to a simple pattern: for six months the space will be rented out to all-comers, and for the rest of the year it will be made available, for free, to three art projects selected from an open call. Besides nurturing the already buoyant, but, from most artists’ point of view, always precarious East London art scene, the idea of Guest Projects is to experiment with a business model for artist-run spaces, freed from the state-funded grants and awards that usually form the bulk of their income. ‘It’s good to receive some public money, but it doesn’t make you independent – in fact it makes you even more dependent’, says Shonibare. ‘It’s like when people give aid to Africa. It’s fine, of course, but ultimately it should be about people making something for themselves.’

Modus Operandi

Shonibare was born in London to a Nigerian family, grew up in Lagos and came back to the UK as a teenager, and since the mid-nineties he has been combining clichés of Britishness and Africanness in an attempt to confuse understandings of identity and authenticity. The ‘African’ fabric that the artist uses again and again is a good illustration of the complexity of the idea of origin: first printed with patterns from the Indonesian archipelago, the wax-printed cotton has for more than a century been made in Holland and sold all over Central and Western Africa, where it has been adopted as a cultural symbol. This textile, turned into elaborate period costume – as in his iconic, Gainsborough-quoting installation Mr and Mrs Andrews without Their Heads (1998) – patently highlights the link between British establishment’s wealth and the exploitation of the colonies.

This modus operandi is as simple as it is efficient, and Shonibare has been unashamedly exploiting it over the last decade, if not always to acclaim – the London Evening Standard called the artist’s work ‘laboured’ and ‘repetitive’. But when I ask him about the risk of repeating himself, an amused Shonibare brushes it off: ‘people want to be reassured’, he says, ‘they want to recognise your work but they complain if they feel like you are doing the same thing all the time. I use the fabric to connect with my audience, when they see it, they know it’s me talking to them, it’s like a voice.’

Trojan horse

Shonibare’s spectacular pieces may stem from a critical re-reading of British history, but their meticulous aesthetic also manifests a fascination with Victoriana and the idea of the establishment. This paradox lies at the core not only of the artist’s practice, but also of his personality: Shonibare seems to be as eager to provoke as he is to please. In 2005, he readily accepted an MBE award – becoming a Member of the British Empire – and has appended the honour to his name ever since. Other black British artists have reacted very differently to such ‘imperial’ recognition. In 2003, Rasta poet Benjamin Zephaniah publically rejected his OBE on the grounds that the very name of the Order of the British Empire reminded him of ‘thousands of years of brutality’. Unlike Zephaniah, Shonibare took the inside route, one that for him was not incompatible with a critical politics. ‘When I went to college’, he says, ‘there were a number of other politically-aware black artists, gravitating around people like Eddie Chambers. They were seen as radical, but not really part of the mainstream. I’ve always thought that the Trojan horse approach was a better one, when you actually go in, you are part of everything, but you contest everything. Being mainstream also creates an interesting ambivalence. Are you complicit or challenging? It’s an open question.’

The Death of the Salesman

After more than ten years of poking at the historical establishment, Shonibare’s solo show at Stephen Friedman addresses the contemporary ruling classes: bankers and business moguls. The exhibition takes as a starting point Shonibare’s interpretation of Arthur Miller’s play The Death of a Salesman (1949), imagining what might happen to the protagonist Willy Loman after his demise. ‘The exhibition is a reaction to the current economic climate’, explains Shonibare. ‘When you read the newspaper or listen to the radio, you feel that there is a sort of moral search about bankers. Do they need so much money? Is it right that they get so much in bonuses? Willy Loman encapsulates this idea. When he dies, does he go to hell or does he go to heaven?’

In a series of dramatically staged photographs inspired by Gustave Doré’s etchings, Shonibare sends his Willy Loman, clad in wax-printed cotton, down into Dante’s Divine Comedy. Unnoticed, Loman follows Dante and Virgil through the Inferno, passing by thieves tortured by snakes, gluttons crawling around beasts’ corpses and the avaricious struggling with stuffed moneybags. Shonibare’s main character is present but detached, powerless as he faces his own destiny. The artist is no moralist; there are no judgments in these images, just question marks. And the pictures have a much rawer feel than anything Shonibare has done before. ‘The irony of this, of course’, he points out, ‘is that once they’ll be very big, framed in a gallery in Mayfair, they’ll be completely aestheticised.’ The installation also includes winged statues of CEOs heading the bailed-out ‘Big Three’ – Chrysler, Ford and General Motors – and a life-sized crashed car. But rather than these sculptures, it’s the photographs’ inner contradiction between the rough and the beautiful that best encapsulates the artist’s message. ‘The show is done very lavishly’, he tells me, ‘as if to say: greed is just around the corner, nothing is finished. It’s just a temporary break.’

Yinka Shonibare
15/10/2009 – 20/11/2009
Stephen Friedman Gallery, London, UK
www.stephenfriedman.com

IMAGE CREDITS

Images 1, 2 and 3: Photograph on the set of Yinka Shonibare's new photographic works, London, 2009. Courtesy: Yinka Shonibare, Stephen Friedman Gallery, London. Photo: Hugo Glendinning.

Gustave Doré, illustration for Dante Alighieri's Inferno, Canto XXIV: The Thieves tortured by Serpents, 1857.

Gustave Doré, illustration for Dante Alighieri's Inferno, Plate XXII, Canto VII: The hoarders and wasters, 1857.

Yinka Shonibare, Boy on a Globe, 2008. Mannequin, Dutch wax printed cotton textile and globe. 175 x 125 x 125cm. Courtesy: Yinka Shonibare, Stephen Friedman Gallery, London, and James Cohan Gallery, New York.

Installation view of ‘Yinka Shonibare, MBE: A Flying Machine for Every Man, Woman and Child’, Miami Art Museum. Courtesy: Yinka Shonibare, Stephen Friedman Gallery, London, and James Cohan Gallery, New York.

Yinka Shonibare, Mr and Mrs Andrews Without Their Heads, 1998. Wax-print cotton costumes on armatures, dog, mannequin, bench, gun. 165 x 570 x 254cm. Courtesy: National Gallery of Canada, Ottawa. Photo: Stephen White.

Yinka Shonibare, Egg Fight, 2009. Two Mannequins, Dutch wax printed cotton textile, leather boots, replica guns, rope, polystyrene eggs and silicon. Dimensions variable. Courtesy: Yinka Shonibare, Stephen Friedman Gallery, London, and James Cohan Gallery, New York. Commissioned by Dublin City Gallery The Hugh Lane. Photo: Eugene Langan.

Français

L’autre Yinka Shonibare

Coline Milliard

L’ancien nominé du Turner Prize nous reçoit chez lui pour parler crise économique, artist-run space et cheval de Troie.

« Je vois l’art comme une sorte d’alchimie », m’annonce Yinka Shonibare. « Il permet d’exercer un réel contrôle sur son image, sur sa vie. » Sa propre carrière illustre bien ses propos. Très peu d’artistes peuvent se vanter d’avoir le succès que Shonibare connaît depuis plus de dix ans. Ses installations de mannequins en luxueux costumes d’époque sont dans les meilleures collections d’art contemporain ; le tissu africain qu’il utilise est devenu une véritable signature. Une grande rétrospective de son travail vient de quitter Sydney pour New York, sa sculpture de « bateau en bouteille » ornera bientôt le Fourth Plinth1 de Trafalgar Square, et quand je le rencontre dans sa maison victorienne de l’est londonien, l’artiste prépare une exposition personnelle prévue pour octobre. C’est une carrière brillante, que l’on pense familière. Mais la continuité parfois déroutante du travail de Shonibare a souvent oblitéré les finesses d’une pratique artistique en constante évolution. Mise au point.

Guest Projects

« À l’époque où je débutais, il y avait énormément d’espaces d’exposition temporaires un peu partout dans Londres. Puis l’immobilier est devenu tellement prohibitif que tout le monde a dû s’arrêter. Avec Guest Projects, j’ai eu envie de retrouver un peu de cette énergie-là. » Depuis septembre, le rez-de-chaussée de l’atelier de Shonibare est devenu un espace d'exposition expérimental. L’artiste conçoit le lieu comme une extension de son propre travail, une manière d’être en contact avec la création actuelle et peut-être aussi de remettre en question un milieu de plus en plus tourné vers l’art « prêt à consommer ». « Il faut arrêter de se concentrer uniquement sur des objets finis, les gens doivent comprendre qu’il est important de financer la recherche, sinon la créativité s'assèche. » Mis en place suite au succès de Three by Three (un programme d’expositions qui avait lieu dans son atelier avant rénovation), Guest Projects se veut financièrement autonome: l’espace est loué pendant six mois pour des événements, permettant de payer l’autre moitié de l’année où il est mis à disposition de trois projets. Axé sur la performance, l’espace peut jouer un rôle important au sein de la scène artistique de l’est londonien qui compte encore aujourd’hui peu de lieux dédiés au médium. La structure expérimente aussi avec un modèle d’artist-run space indépendant, parce qu’affranchi du financement des institutions gouvernementales. « C’est bien sûr utile de recevoir de l’argent public, mais ça vous rend redevable. C’est comme quand on envoie de l’aide humanitaire en Afrique, c’est bien, évidemment, mais pour que ça marche, les gens doivent s’en sortir seuls. »

Modus Operandi

Shonibare a grandi entre deux pays: il est né à Londres dans une famille nigérienne et a été élevé à Lagos avant de retourner en Grande Bretagne à l'adolescence. Depuis le début des années 1990, il met en scène dans ses œuvres des clichés de britannicité et d’africanité pour critiquer les stéréotypes encore attachés aux notions d’identité et d’authentique. Le tissu ‘africain’, que l’artiste utilise de manière récurrente, cristallise ces problématiques. Tirant leurs origines dans le batik indonésien, les ‘wax’ (ainsi nommée à cause de leur technique d’impression à la cire) sont depuis plus d’un siècle produites en Hollande et revendues sur les marchés d’Afrique centrale et occidentale où elles ont été adoptées comme un symbole de fierté nationale. Comme dans l’installation inspirée par Thomas Gainsborough Mr and Mrs Andrews without their Heads (1998), ce tissu, transformé en costumes historiques du XVIIIeme et XIXeme siècle, matérialise le lien entre la fortune de l’establishment britannique et l’asservissement des colonies.

Shonibare a exploité sans relâche ce modus operandi aussi simple qu’efficace, et pas toujours été apprécié des critiques. Le journal London Evening Standard a même qualifié son travail de « laborieux » et « répétitif ». Est-il inquiet de se répéter ? « Les gens ont besoin d'identifier facilement votre travail pour se rassurer mais dès qu'ils ont l'impression que vous faites toujours la même chose, ils se plaignent. J’utilise ce tissu pour créer un lien avec mon public. Quand ils le voient, ils savent que c’est moi qui leur parle, c’est comme une voix. »

Cheval de Troie

Les œuvres exubérantes de Shonibare partent peut-être d’une relecture critique de l’histoire britannique mais le soin presque fétichiste apporté à leur réalisation manifeste une fascination non déguisée pour l’establishment et la période victorienne. Ce paradoxe n’est pas seulement au cœur du travail de l’artiste, il se retrouve dans sa personnalité même. Shonibare veut tout autant plaire que provoquer. En 2005, il accepte sans hésiter le titre officiel de MBE, Membre de l’Empire Britannique, trois lettres désormais indissociables de son nom. D’autres artistes britanniques noirs ont réagi très différemment à l’honneur royal. En 2003, le poète Rasta Benjamin Zephaniah refuse publiquement son OBE et écrit dans le Guardian que le nom d’ « Order of the British Empire » lui évoquait « des milliers d’années de violence ». Shonibare a choisi une approche plus conciliante, tout à fait compatible, selon lui, avec un engagement politique. « Quand j’étais en école d’art, il y avait un certain nombre d’artistes noirs très politisés, rassemblés autour de figures comme Eddie Chambers. Ils étaient considérés comme radicaux, mais étaient un peu à part. J’ai toujours pensé qu’il valait mieux adopter la tactique du cheval de Troie : se faire accepter et profiter de cette position pour remettre en question de l’intérieur l’ordre établi. Complice ou critique ? La question reste ouverte. »

Mort d’un commis voyageur

Après des années consacrées à la classe dirigeante d’autrefois, l’exposition personnelle de Shonibare chez Stephen Friedman se tourne vers l’aristocratie contemporaine, les banquiers et les barons de l’industrie. Elle prend pour point de départ la pièce d’Arthur Miller Mort d’un commis voyageur (1949), imaginant ce qui pourrait arriver au protagoniste Willy Loman après son accident. « Cette exposition répond à la situation économique actuelle. Dans les médias, on trouve beaucoup de questions d’ordre moral sur les banquiers. Ont-ils vraiment besoin d’autant d’argent ? Mon Willy Loman représente cette idée. Ira-t-il au paradis ou en enfer ? »

Shonibare parachute son Willy Loman version africaine au cœur de la Divine Comédie de Dante, dans une série de photographies spectaculairement mises en scène inspirés des gravures de Gustave Doré. On y voit Loman suivre discrètement Dante et Virgile en enfer, et croiser tour à tour les voleurs aux prises de serpents, les gourmands rampant au milieu de carcasses sanglantes et les avares englués dans de lourds sacs d’or. Il contemple impuissant l’accomplissement de son propre destin. Ces images n'imposent pas de jugement moral, elles se posent en question. Le vocabulaire plastique est beaucoup plus brut que dans les œuvres précédentes de l’artiste, mais comme il le fait justement remarquer « L’ironie dans tout ça bien sûr, c’est qu’une fois les photos imprimées en grand, encadrées et montrées dans une galerie à Mayfair, elles deviennent des objets de désir et de consommation. » L’exposition inclut aussi la statue ailée des directeurs des trois compagnies automobiles américaines récemment renflouées par le gouvernement (Chrysler, Ford et General Motors), et une voiture accidentée grandeur nature. Pourtant, plus que ces sculptures, c’est bien cette contradiction entre la nature crue des images et leur opulence visuelle qui capture au mieux le message de l’artiste. « L’exposition a été réalisée avec de très gros moyens ; c’est une manière de rappeler : on en a pas fini avec l’avarice et l’envie, ce n’est qu’une accalmie. »

Yinka Shonibare
15/10/2009 – 20/11/2009
Stephen Friedman Gallery
London, UK
www.stephenfriedman.com

1] Le Fourth Plinth est un programme de commandes d’œuvres publiques exposées sur un socle vide de Trafalgar Square à Londres.

IMAGE CREDITS

Images 1, 2 and 3: Photograph on the set of Yinka Shonibare's new photographic works, London, 2009. Courtesy: Yinka Shonibare, Stephen Friedman Gallery, London. Photo: Hugo Glendinning.

Gustave Doré, illustration for Dante Alighieri's Inferno, Canto XXIV: The Thieves tortured by Serpents, 1857.

Gustave Doré, illustration for Dante Alighieri's Inferno, Plate XXII, Canto VII: The hoarders and wasters, 1857.

Yinka Shonibare, Boy on a Globe, 2008. Mannequin, Dutch wax printed cotton textile and globe. 175 x 125 x 125cm. Courtesy: Yinka Shonibare, Stephen Friedman Gallery, London, and James Cohan Gallery, New York.

Installation view of ‘Yinka Shonibare, MBE: A Flying Machine for Every Man, Woman and Child’, Miami Art Museum. Courtesy: Yinka Shonibare, Stephen Friedman Gallery, London, and James Cohan Gallery, New York.

Yinka Shonibare, Mr and Mrs Andrews Without Their Heads, 1998. Wax-print cotton costumes on armatures, dog, mannequin, bench, gun. 165 x 570 x 254cm. Courtesy: National Gallery of Canada, Ottawa. Photo: Stephen White.

Yinka Shonibare, Egg Fight, 2009. Two Mannequins, Dutch wax printed cotton textile, leather boots, replica guns, rope, polystyrene eggs and silicon. Dimensions variable. Courtesy: Yinka Shonibare, Stephen Friedman Gallery, London, and James Cohan Gallery, New York. Commissioned by Dublin City Gallery The Hugh Lane. Photo: Eugene Langan.

 
advertisement advertisement advertisement