artwork image
artwork image
artwork image
artwork image
artwork image
artwork image
artwork image

English

Ugly Feeling

Notes on Feminist Art Today

Joanna Fiduccia

Between the 'boredom factor' and forestalled revolutions, feminist positions in art today must contend with a number of ugly feelings. Joanna Fiduccia considers how Kate Davis, Lucy Skaer and Lili Reynaud-Dewar convert feminism's less triumphant legacies into aesthetic strategies for escaping ideological deadlock.

In her book A Decade of Negative Thinking (2009), the painter and writer Mira Schor laments the fate that befell so-called ‘Generation 2.5’ feminist artists: those who came of age at the acme of the women’s liberation movement, who participated in the first feminist studies departments, who solidified feminist tropes and techniques – and yet who were all-but excluded from recent survey exhibitions of feminist art. They are the victims, Schor presumes, of ‘the boredom factor’, their absence signifying the pernicious social logic that tallies the worthy and interesting only with what’s new, regardless of whether the goals of the old have been achieved. For the kiss of death of any struggle is to become familiar. ‘As the repeated declarations of feminism’s death in the mainstream media and the academy make clear’, writes Jane Elliott in her 2006 essay ‘The Currency of Feminist Theory’, ‘the production of the new as the signal intellectual value can be used to dismiss uncomfortable insights, which don’t have to be disproved as long as they can be made to seem passé’.1 The boredom factor, in other words, serves not only as a diagnosis but also as an occlusion, forestalling change by announcing that its impetus is history.

If the boredom factor burdens Schor and her peers today, subsequent generations of artists have not necessarily experienced a renewed feminism so much as one enlivened by the tension of critical distance. Sophisticated projects often frame a feminist position within another (evidently exterior) stance. The second edition of the curatorial platform ‘If I Can’t Dance, I Don’t Want To Be Part of Your Revolution’ (the famous slogan attributed to anarchist Emma Goldman), for instance, ‘examine[d] the legacies and potentials of feminism […] from a variety of contemporary artistic positions’ (my emphasis) – a multiplicity that, though it might be reconciled with claims for the heterogeneity of feminism today, looks rather like a concession to those participating artists who do not identify as feminists. This dispersion is used to take up bell hooks’s concept of continuous ‘feminist movement’, as opposed to the historical entity of ‘the feminist movement’, its various positions offering a ‘way out’ of whatever depleted, inspissated arteries once pumped feminism’s lifeblood.

Yet are we so sure that we need a way out rather than a way in? In, that is, back toward the negativity that feminism has so long fled. Indeed what Schor neglects is that boredom itself, like a good many other ugly feelings, may be the lodestone of feminist art today – affects paradoxically capable of attracting new feminist thought through their mild repulsiveness, repetitiveness and anachronisms.

Marked woman

In Kate Davis’s 2009 video Disgrace, a still frame of a 1972 catalogue of Modigliani drawings alternates with ten seconds of black screen. Each successive shot shows a tracing of one of Davis’s body parts on the page, contours that accumulate into a tangle of lines defacing Modigliani’s pear-shaped paragon. In the intervals, a chorus intones ‘Boohoo!’ – one less voice with each repetition, such that by the time the artist has inscribed twenty outlines of her body onto Modigliani’s, a lone voice sounds the self-deprecation. Like the stand-up comic whose charm wears off before she has exhausted her self-pity, the ‘boohoo’ satirises Davis’ act of applying herself (most literally) to art history. The ‘real’ representation of the female body (Davis’s) is reduced to indecipherable squiggles while, as if in defiance, Modigliani’s figure remains coherent, even retrogressively incorporating Davis’s antic lines into the clarity of its original rendering. The ‘disgrace’ of the title would seem to be Davis’: the disgrace of a desperate act of self-inscription, the disgrace of the book’s defacement, the disgrace of its ineffectuality.

Disgrace’s structure, however, deftly subverts this reading. Much like Rauschenberg in his Erased de Kooning (1953), Davis manages to escape the scene of the crime – a crime doubly exposed as Davis’s trifling vandalism and art history’s grave exclusions – by virtue of never appearing directly on film. Leaving her mark on Modigliani’s ‘marked’ woman, she tags the book with lines unidentifiable as a representation of a woman, but certainly representative as women’s. No longer content to be (literally) marginalised, they swell over Modigliani’s nude, taking up what Monique Wittig, drawing from Colette Guillaumin’s writings on racial markings, describes as a ‘materialist feminist position’: one that recognises that ‘what we take for the cause or origin of oppression is in fact only the mark imposed by the oppressor: the “myth of woman”.’2 Or what Virginia Woolf calls ‘the Angel in the House’. Who must be killed.

The Dark Continent

In Sianne Ngai’s Ugly Feelings (2005), from which this text draws its title, the author considers Adorno’s analysis of the political and social ineffectuality of bourgeois art. Adorno notes that the aesthetic autonomy or ‘separateness from “empirical society” which art gains as a consequence of the bourgeois revolution ironically coincides with its growing awareness of its inability to significantly change that society – a powerlessness that then becomes the privileged object of the newly autonomous art’s “guilty” self-reflection’.3 Ngai goes on to argue, however, that this ineffectuality may be uniquely enabling. ‘[Autonomous art’s] own “powerlessness” and superfluity in the “empirical world”,’ she writes, ‘is precisely what makes it capable of theorising social powerlessness in a manner unrivaled by other forms of cultural praxis.’ If feminist art of the 1970s and 1980s articulated itself in contrary terms – organising its efforts around social change (both within and without the art world), and expressing triumphant self-reflection (after centuries of the suppression and omission of the female self) – works like Davis’s Disgrace or the prints of English artist Lucy Skaer take a tack much closer to Ngai’s paradox of ‘powerless’ autonomous art. Making of their ineffectuality or latency a theme, they suggest an alternative approach for feminist art today.

For Fabrication (2009), Skaer produced a series of black woodblock prints from the surface of a dining room table. By reconfiguring the five table leaves, she evokes a wordless syntax made explicit by painting punctuation marks (commas and semicolons and periods) around the inked segments on the paper. The same procedure reappears in Ibid (2009), among her contributions for the Turner Prize at the Tate Britain last year, in which Skaer printed the many planes of a chair onto a scroll of paper, diagramming the object’s surfaces as one might diagram a sentence: by dismantling it (and thus denying its function). The resulting forms are vaguely cuneiform; they seem to promise the possibility of their own decryption, if only one had a Rosetta stone for domestic objects. They gesture toward speech embodied by things (among which, historically, one can count women), or rather, written by them – an écriture for the repressed.

In ‘The Laugh of the Medusa’ (1971), Hélène Cixous’s explosive manifesto, Cixous calls for the practice of an écriture feminine, writing that ‘inscribes femininity’ and that ‘bring[s] women to writing, from which they have been driven away as violently as from their bodies – for the same reason, by the same law.’ As Cixous explains, ‘there is such a thing as marked writing […] [which] has been run by a libidinal and cultural – hence political, typically masculine – economy’. She summons the woman writer to overcome this locus of repression, to ‘write [her] self’ by giving voice to her body and thus overcoming the bodiless, superegoised figure she has been compelled to play, the ‘dark continent’ of her sexuality, in Freud’s words. Curiously, like Woolf, Cixous stages this overcoming as a violent act against another woman: ‘We must kill the false woman who is preventing the live one from breathing.’4

This summons, while pertaining specifically to a feminist cause, arose in the context of a larger theory that sought to analyse and undermine the hierarchy between speech and writing, which had dominated understandings of both for centuries. Speech, as the primary act, supposedly manifested a fundamental Truth or logos, while writing was but a secondary act of notation. Part of the project to overturn this hierarchy, as undertaken notably by Derrida’s Writing and Difference (1967), consisted in exposing the mediated nature of speech itself through its division into signified and signifier.

Skaer’s prints present an extremely subtle farce of this history of deconstruction through the direct application of the signified and its fantastical sublation into (the affects of a) language. This embodied language, with its veiled erotics of exhaustively pressing and imprinting, confronts the liberation of repressed, sensual speech with its fundamental unintelligibility.

Bad timing

The latency in Ibid and Fabrication signals an ‘ugly’ aspect of écriture féminine: its lateness. Écriture féminine was bedeviled by a certain aesthetic tardiness, a ‘belated modernism’ in Ngai’s words, arriving at exactly the wrong moment for feminist struggles as a whole.5 As Rosi Braidotti notes, écriture féminine (and écriture generally speaking) entailed ‘deconstructing, dismissing, or displacing the notion of the rational subject at the very historical moment when women [were] beginning to have access to the use of discourse, power and pleasure.’6 The decentred or anti-rational subject moreover corresponded to clichés of femininity that had long furnished excuses for stripping women of political agency.

This bad timing, which thus could be said to have beleaguered feminism even in its glory days, afflicted not only the feminist intelligentsia, but also the women’s workforce.7 As French artist Lili Reynaud-Dewar reflects in her video installation Structures de pouvoir, rituels et sexualité chez les sténodactylos européennes (amanuensis) [The power structures, rituals and sexuality of European typists (amanuensis)] (2010), gainful employment for women as skilled typists was institutionalised only a handful of years before the introduction of the personal computer would make them obsolete. Presented at the FRAC Champagne-Ardenne in early 2010, the installation comprises a ring of mirrored tables, two typewriters, two costumes, two projections, and two large hand-shaped wooden silhouettes. In the video projections, hands caked in cardinal colours play over the keyboards of late-model typewriters, foregrounded by the two wooden hand silhouettes appearing on the mirror top as if from under the desk. In certain frames, all four animate (but just as disembodied) hands appear on screen, consorting almost homosocially. The deliberate, ugly anachronism of the shots, with their suggestions of 1980s mirror palaces and flashy fashion palettes, and the restive but senseless motion of the hands (there is, after all, no paper in the typewriters – and no bosses for which these hands could serve as disembodied amanuenses) speaks to the almost immediate obsolescence of diploma-ed typists. By extension, it also parallels a darker history to which feminist movements seem again and again condemned, doomed to seem passé only moments after they are inaugurated.

The capacity of these works, to quote Ngai, for ‘theorising [the] socialness’ of this doom, is a deeply feminist project insofar as it speaks an unspeakable from outside marked writing, from outside, even, the ‘myth of the feminist’. By inhabiting these regions, Davis, Skaer and Reynaud-Dewar wade not just in a contemporary feminist context, but in a perennial feminist dilemma that will not go away by turning away from it, any more than by adopting critical distance. Instead, there is reason to see in the ineffectual, badly timed, inarticulate or mute, the self-deprecating, idle, dismantled or incoherent, in short, in ugly feeling, not just a way in, but a way forward.

1] Mira Schor, A Decade of Negative Thinking: Essays on Art, Politics, and Daily Life (Durham, N.C.: Duke University Press), 60.

2] Wittig argues that sex, like race, is seen as an ‘immediate given […] belonging to a natural order’, however ‘what we believe to be a physical and direct perception is only a sophisticated and mythic construction, an “imaginary formation”, which reinterprets physical features (in themselves […] neutral […]) through the network of relationships in which they are perceived.’ The myth of woman thus obscures the reality of this exploitative, oppressive network. Monique Wittig, ‘One Is Not Born a Woman’ in The Norton Anthology of Theory and Criticism, 2nd ed., eds. Vincent B. Leitch, William E. Cain, Laurie Finke, Barbara Johnson, John McGowan , T. Denean Sharpley-Whiting and Jeffrey J. Williams (New York: W.W. Norton & Co., 2010), 1908.

3] Sianne Ngai, Ugly Feelings (Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press), 2.

4] Hélène Cixous, ‘The Laugh of the Medusa’ in The Norton Anthology of Theory and Criticism, 1942; 1945; 1947.

5] Ngai, Op. cit., 313.

6] Rosi Braidotti, from Nomadic Subjects: Embodiment and Sexual Difference in Contemporary Feminist Theory, quoted in Ngai, Op. cit., 309–310.

7] Cf. Ngai, ‘Bad Timing (A Sequel): Paranoia, Feminism, and Poetry’ in differences: A Journal of Feminist Cultural Studies, Volume 12, Number 2 (Summer 2001): 1–46; and Andrew T. I. Ross, ‘Viennese Waltzes’, enclitic 8 (Spring/Fall 1984): 71–83.

IMAGE CREDITS

Kate Davis, Disgrace, 2009
Framed pencil on found image (unique)
and film work (edition of 4)
44 x 35 cm / quicktime data file on disc duration 9 min 36 sec
Courtesy of Sorcha Dallas

Kate Davis, Disgrace, 2009
Framed pencil on found image (unique)
and film work (edition of 4)
44 x 35 cm / quicktime data file on disc duration 9 min 36 sec
Courtesy of Sorcha Dallas

Lucy Skaer, Fabrication, 2009
Georgian table & 6 prints each 140 x 400 cm printing ink on paper
Installation view Kunsthalle Basel
Courtesy the artist and doggerfisher, Edinburgh

Lucy Skaer, Fabrication, 2009 (detail)
Georgian table & 6 prints each 140 x 400 cm printing ink on paper
Installation view Kunsthalle Basel
Courtesy the artist and doggerfisher, Edinburgh

Lucy Skaer, Thames and Hudson, 2009 (detail)
Ink on paper
140 x 400 cm
Courtesy the artist and doggerfisher, Edinburgh

Lucy Skaer, Thames and Hudson, 2009
Ink on paper
140 x 400 cm
Installation view
Courtesy the artist and doggerfisher, Edinburgh

Lili Reynaud-Dewar, Structures de pouvoirs, Rituels et Sexualité chez les Sténodactylos européennes (Amanuensis), 2010
Vue de l'exposition Structures de pouvoir, Rituels et Sexualité chez les sténodactylos européennes, kamel mennour, Paris
© Lili Reynaud-Dewar Photo. Charles Duprat
Courtesy the artist and kamel mennour, Paris

Français

Pensées sur le féminisme dans l'art d'aujourd'hui

Joanna Fiduccia

Victime de ringardise et de révolutions avortées, le féminisme dans l'art doit désormais faire face à un certain nombre de sentiments négatifs. Joanna Fiduccia analyse la façon dont Kate Davis, Lucy Skaer et Lili Reynaud-Dewar convertissent l'héritage pas toujours glorieux du féminisme en strategies esthétiques qui contournent l'impasse idéologique.

Dans son livre A Decade of Negative Thinking (2009), l'écrivain et peintre Mira Schor déplore le sort des artistes féministes de la soi-disant “Génération 2.5” qui ont activement participé au mouvement de libération des femmes et à l'élaboration du concept spécifique de "Feminist Studies" à travers la création des premiers départements universitaires féministes. Il est frappant de constater qu'aucune d'entre elles n'a participé aux grandes expositions historiques récemment consacrées au féminisme dans l'art. D'après Schor, le “facteur de lassitude” serait la cause de cette absence révélatrice d'un phénomène néfaste de notre société actuelle obsédée par la nouveauté seule digne d'interêt et capable d'ignorer les accomplissements du passé. Toute lutte sait qu'elle sera tôt ou tard victime de son succès. “Les médias et les universaires martèlent haut et fort la mort du féminisme, écrit Jane Elliott dans son essai “The Currency of Feminist Theory” (2006), mais il est évident que la dictature intellectuelle de la nouveauté est une façon d'écarter les idées qui gênent : il est plus facile de dire qu'elles sont ringardes que de les regarder en face.”1 Autrement dit, le “facteur de lassitude” n'est pas un simple fait mais une tactique visant à évacuer toute promesse de changement puisque de toute façon il a déjà eu lieu avant.

Si ce "facteur de lassitude" pèse autant sur Schor et ses pairs aujourd'hui, on ne peut pas dire que les générations suivantes aient vraiment connu le renouveau du féminisme mais plutôt son exaltation critique. La complexité de certains projets sert souvent à enchâsser la question du féminisme dans une autre problématique, sans lien manifeste. Par exemple, la seconde édition de la plateforme curatoriale "If I Can't Dance, I Don't Want To Be Part of Your Revolution" (célèbre slogan attribué à l'anarchiste Emma Goldman), "analyse l'héritage et le potentiel du féminisme […] du point de vue de la diversité des pratiques de nombreux artistes contemporains" et je souligne ce passage en italiques car cette "diversité", certes en harmonie avec les tendances du féminisme actuel avide d'hétérogénéité, m'a tout l'air d'un compromis vis-à-vis des artistes invités qui ne se revendiquent pas féministes. Ce phénomène de dispersion se place dans la lignée d'un "mouvement féministe" continu énoncé par bell hooks, en opposition à l'entité historique qu'on nomme "le mouvement féministe". Cette diversité offre une “porte de sortie” au féminisme aujourd'hui vidé de son sang, les artères de son cœur bouchées, congestionnées.

Mais avons nous réellement besoin d'une porte de sortie ? Ne serait-il pas plus juste de retrouver la porte d'entrée ? Une entrée dans tous ces sentiments négatifs que le féminisme a fui pendant si longtemps. Schor devrait plutôt prendre ce sentiment de lassitude (et autres sentiments négatifs) comme la nouvelle force d'attraction de l'art féministe aujourd'hui. Car contrairement à ce que l'on pourrait croire, ces affects sont capables d'aimanter le nouveau courant de pensée féministe malgré leur aspect légèrement repoussant, répétitif et anachronique.

Une femme marquée

La vidéo Disgrace (2009) de Kate Davis alterne le plan fixe d'un catalogue de dessins de Modigliani de 1972 avec dix secondes d'écran noir. À chaque nouveau plan, une ligne trace les contours d'une partie du corps de Davis sur la page, les traits s'accumulent et se superposent jusqu'à défigurer les formes voluptueuses du modèle de Modigliani. Quand l'écran devient noir, un chœur gémit “Ouin! Ouin!” avec à chaque fois, une voix en moins. Tandis que la dernière voix se retrouve seule à se moquer d'elle-même, l'artiste marque le vingtième contour de son corps sur le dessin de Modigliani. Ce “Ouin! Ouin!” donne l'impression d'une comique seule sur scène dont le charme se dissipe avant qu'elle ait fini de s'apitoyer sur son sort, il tourne en dérision l'artiste qui tente de s'inscrire (presque littéralement) dans l'histoire de l'art. La "vraie" représentation du corps féminin (celui de Davis) est réduite à de petits gribouillis tandis que par défi, la silhouette de Modigliani reste solide et cohérente jusqu'à incorporer les lignes tracées comme partie intégrante de l'original. La honte ("disgrace") évoquée dans le titre est probablement celle de Davis : la honte de l'acte désespéré de s'"écrire", la honte de la mutilation du livre, la honte de son inefficacité.

Cependant, la structure de Disgrace détourne adroitement cette interprétation. Comme Rauschenberg et son Erased de Kooning (1953), Davis parvient à s'échapper de la scène du crime (un crime doublement révélé par le vandalisme insignifiant de l'artiste et par les grands oublis de l'histoire de l'art) grâce au fait qu'elle n'apparaît jamais vraiment directement sur le film. L'artiste laisse sa marque sur la femme “marquée” de Modigliani recouverte de traces qui n'évoquent pas une représentation de la femme mais sont représentatives d'un geste de femmes. Fatiguées d'être (littéralement) marginalisées, elles se propagent sur le nu de Modigliani à l'image de la description de Monique Wittig (elle-même inspirée des écrits de Colette Guillaumin sur les marques raciales) sur "la position féministe matérialiste" comme n'étant pas "la cause ou l'origine de l'oppression mais la marque de l'oppresseur : le 'mythe de la femme'"2 ou ce que Virginia Woolf appelle “l'Ange de la Maison” et qu'il faut tuer.

Un continent obscur

Dans le livre Ugly Feelings (2005) qui a inspiré ce texte, l'auteur Sianne Ngai aborde l'inefficacité politique et sociale de l'art bourgeois telle que l'analyse Adorno. Selon lui, l'autonomie esthétique "est une conséquence de la révolution bourgeoise qui correspond ironiquement au moment où l'art se rend compte qu'il est incapable de changer de façon significative 'la société empirique' dont il s'est séparée – une impuissance que l'art désormais autonome place au cœur sa réflexion rongée de culpabilité"3. Mais Ngai poursuit son raisonnement en expliquant que contrairement à ce que l'on pourrait penser cette inefficacité peut s'avérer particulièrement libératrice. "À la différence des autres manifestations culturelles, l'art autonome va pouvoir utiliser sa propre 'impuissance' et sa richesse comme outil théorique capable d'analyser l'impuissance sociale de ce 'monde empirique'." Pourtant, l'art féministe des années 1970 et 1980 prônait une stratégie totalement inverse à travers sa lutte pour le changement social (et pas seulement dans le monde de l'art) et l'indépendance intellectuelle après des siècles d'indifférence et de frustration. Ainsi, la stratégie de certaines œuvres telles que Disgrace de Davis ou les impressions à l'encre de l'artiste Lucy Skaer est très proche de l'"impuissance" contradictoire de l'autonomie de l'art. L'inefficacité et la latence abordées dans leur travail incarnent une alternative au féminisme dans l'art d'aujourd'hui.

La série Fabrication (2009) de Skaer est composée d'une table de salle à manger entourée de tirages à l'encre noire qui reproduisent l'empreinte de sa surface. Les quatre rallonges de la table se décomposent évoquant une syntaxe sans mots qu'on retrouve explicitement dans les marques de ponctuation (virgules, point-virgules et points) peints autour des segments d'encre. Le même procédé revient dans Ibid (2009) qui figure parmi ses contributions pour le Turner Prize l'année dernière à la Tate Britain. Skaer a répété l'empreinte d'une chaise dans différentes positions à la façon d'un diagramme d'objet. La grammaire de l'objet (ainsi que sa fonction) ici déconstruite évoque la dislocation d'une phrase. Les formes qui en résultent sont vaguement cunéiformes et semblent faire la promesse d'un possible déchiffrage - si seulement il existait une pierre de Rosette pour les objets domestiques. Les formes cherchent un langage que les objets (parmi lesquels on peut compter les femmes) incarnent ou plutôt écrivent – une écriture refoulée.

Dans son manifeste enflammé “The Laugh of the Medusa” (1971), Hélène Cixous revendique la pratique d'une “écriture feminine” (en français dans le texte) qui parviendrait à “inscrire la féminité” et à “pousser les femmes à écrire, une pratique que la loi a violemment interdite, au même titre que leur propre corps.” Pour Cixous, “l'écriture a réellement été marquée […] et dominée par une économie libidinale et culturelle (et donc forcément politique et masculine).” Cixous conjure la femme écrivain de dépasser ce point de répression et de “[s]'écrire elle-même” en donnant à son corps une voix qui pourra dépasser le surmoi de ce personnage désincarné qu'elle a si longtemps interprété malgré elle, dépasser ce que Freud appelle le “continent obscur” de sa sexualité. Cixous, comme Woolf, pense que pour y parvenir, il faut commettre un acte violent envers cette autre femme qui est en nous: “Nous devons tuer la fausse femme qui empêche la vraie de vivre.”4

Il faut toutefois rappeler que cette revendication, bien qu'elle soit particulièrement le fait de la cause féministe, est apparue dans un contexte théorique plus large cherchant à analyser, voire saper la hiérarchie existante entre la parole et l'écriture et qui, pendant des siècles, a dominé notre façon de les appréhender. La parole est un acte primaire qui reflète l'unique Vérité, le logos. L'écriture, par contre, n'est qu'un acte secondaire de notation. L'entreprise visant à renverser cette hiérarchie, notamment mise en œuvre par Jacques Derrida dans Ecriture et Différence (1967), consistait à exposer le rôle médiateur de la parole à travers la distinction entre le signifié et le signifiant.

Le travail d'empreinte et d'impression de Skaer joue subtilement de ce renversement à travers l'usage direct du signifié dont la sublimation parvient à pénétrer les affects du langage. Dans un geste quasiment érotique de pression et d'impression, ce langage incarné se confronte à la libération de la parole sensuelle et réprimée avec sa fondamentale inintelligibilité.

Un moment mal choisi

L'état de latence qui traverse Ibid et Fabrication révèle un autre aspect négatif de l'écriture féminine : sa tardiveté. L'écriture féminine a pâti d'une certaine lenteur esthétique, un “modernisme tardif” pour reprendre l'expression de Ngai, qui arrive au pire moment de l'histoire du combat féministe.5 En effet, Rosi Braidotti explique que l'écriture féminine (et l'écriture de façon générale) va entraîner “la déconstruction, la dissolution, voire la substitution du concept de sujet rationnel au moment même où les femmes commencent à accéder au discours, au pouvoir et au plaisir.”6 Par ailleurs, ce sujet irrationnel, déraisonnable répond parfaitement aux clichés de la féminité qui pendant longtemps avaient servi d'excuse pour priver les femmes de leur voix politique.

Il ne pouvait pas y avoir de moment plus mal choisi. Le féminisme, alors en pleine gloire, est affaibli. Tout le monde est affecté, que ce soit l'intelligentsia féministe ou les travailleuses de la population active. Dans son installation vidéo Structures de pouvoir, rituels et sexualité chez les sténodactylos européennes (amanuensis) (2010), l'artiste française Lili Reynaud-Dewar semble invoquer le destin des femmes sténodactylos qui ont vu l'arrivée des ordinateurs anéantir leurs emplois désormais obsolètes alors qu'elles venaient juste d'obtenir la reconnaissance officielle de leurs salaires. Présentée au FRAC Champagne-Ardenne début 2010, l'installation est composée d'une table en miroir et en cercle, deux machines à écrire, deux costumes, deux grandes mains en bois disposées au centre et deux projections de mains colorées qu'on voit s'agiter au-dessus de modèles de machines à écrire dernier cri. Au premier plan, on voit apparaître la silhouette des deux mains en bois qui par un jeu de miroir donnent l'impression d'être sous le bureau. Sur certaines images, quatre mains désincarnées apparaissent sur l'écran et se touchent comme si elles flirtaient entre elles. Dans cette atmosphère de palais des glaces et de couleurs vives style années 1980, les mains s'agitent de façon absurde sans qu'il n'y ait aucun papier dans les machines à écrire ni de chef à qui obéir. Les plans, volontairement anachroniques et disgracieux, nous ramènent à l'obsolescence quasi-immédiate des dactylos diplômées. Mais on pense aussi au triste destin des mouvements féministes condamnés à se démoder aussitôt instaurés.

La capacité de ces œuvres à “théoriser [l'] impuissance sociale” de ce destin (pour reprendre à nouveau une expression de Ngai) est profondément féministe dans la mesure où elle exprime une forme d'écriture incompréhensible de l'extérieur, extérieure même au “mythe féministe”. Davis, Skaer et Reynaud-Dewar incarnent au-delà du contexte féministe actuel, un dilemme féministe éternel auquel ni l'indifférence, ni la distance critique ne pourront échapper. Au contraire, il faut voir l'inefficacité, l'inexprimable, le désœuvrement, la culpabilité, l'incohérence, la dislocation, les ratages, les silences, en bref tous les sentiments négatifs, pas seulement comme une porte d'entrée, mais une porte vers l'avant.

1] Mira Schor, A Decade of Negative Thinking: Essays on Art, Politics, and Daily Life (Durham, N.C.: Duke University Press), p. 60.

2] Pour Wittig, le sexe, au même titre que la race, est considéré comme 'un fait acquis de la nature', alors que 'ce que nous percevons comme un phénomène physique spontané est en réalité une construction subtile de l'ordre du mythe, une "formation imaginaire" qui réinterprète les caractéristiques physiques (neutres à la base) à travers un réseau de relations dans lequel on les perçoit.’ Le mythe de la femme cache la réalité de ce réseau exploiteur et oppresseur. Monique Wittig, ‘One Is Not Born a Woman’ in The Norton Anthology of Theory and Criticism, 2nd ed., eds. Vincent B. Leitch, William E. Cain, Laurie Finke, Barbara Johnson, John McGowan , T. Denean Sharpley-Whiting and Jeffrey J. Williams (New York: W.W. Norton & Co., 2010), 1908.

3] Sianne Ngai, Ugly Feelings (Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press), p. 2.

4] Hélène Cixous, "The Laugh of the Medusa" dans The Norton Anthology of Theory and Criticism, 1942; 1945; 1947.

5] Ngai, op. cit., p. 313.

6] Rosi Braidotti, from Nomadic Subjects: Embodiment and Sexual Difference in Contemporary Feminist Theory, quoted in Ngai, op. cit., pp. 309–310.

7] Ngai, ‘Bad Timing (A Sequel): Paranoia, Feminism, and Poetry’ in differences: A Journal of Feminist Cultural Studies, Volume 12, Numéro 2 (Été 2001), pp. 1–46 ; Andrew T. I. Ross, ‘Viennese Waltzes’, enclitic 8 (Spring/Fall 1984), pp. 71–83.

IMAGE CREDITS

Kate Davis, Disgrace, 2009
Framed pencil on found image (unique)
and film work (edition of 4)
44 x 35 cm / quicktime data file on disc duration 9 min 36 sec
Courtesy of Sorcha Dallas

Kate Davis, Disgrace, 2009
Framed pencil on found image (unique)
and film work (edition of 4)
44 x 35 cm / quicktime data file on disc duration 9 min 36 sec
Courtesy of Sorcha Dallas

Lucy Skaer, Fabrication, 2009
Georgian table & 6 prints each 140 x 400 cm printing ink on paper
Installation view Kunsthalle Basel
Courtesy the artist and doggerfisher, Edinburgh

Lucy Skaer, Fabrication, 2009 (detail)
Georgian table & 6 prints each 140 x 400 cm printing ink on paper
Installation view Kunsthalle Basel
Courtesy the artist and doggerfisher, Edinburgh

Lucy Skaer, Thames and Hudson, 2009 (detail)
Ink on paper
140 x 400 cm
Courtesy the artist and doggerfisher, Edinburgh

Lucy Skaer, Thames and Hudson, 2009
Ink on paper
140 x 400 cm
Installation view
Courtesy the artist and doggerfisher, Edinburgh

Lili Reynaud-Dewar, Structures de pouvoirs, Rituels et Sexualité chez les Sténodactylos européennes (Amanuensis), 2010
Vue de l'exposition Structures de pouvoir, Rituels et Sexualité chez les sténodactylos européennes, kamel mennour, Paris
© Lili Reynaud-Dewar Photo. Charles Duprat
Courtesy the artist and kamel mennour, Paris

 
advertisement advertisement advertisement