artwork image
artwork image
artwork image
artwork image
artwork image
artwork image
artwork image
artwork image
artwork image

English

Guerrilla Mechanics

Thomas Hirschhorn's Studio

Florence Ostende

For his studio, Thomas Hirschhorn has chosen Aubervilliers, a culturally diverse and working-class suburb of Paris – once a communist stronghold and the cradle of industrialisation in Île-de-France. The artist, true to his reputation as a workaholic, has invested body and soul in this beehive-like superstructure where he is currently preparing the Swiss pavilion for the Venice Biennale.

A visit to Thomas Hirschhorn’s studio really starts outside, in the backstreets surrounding it. Wholesalers display their stocks of computers, bags, shoes, jewellery and clothes; mannequins are lined up behind the shop windows. I’m transported back to Hirschhorn’s 2007 exhibition Concretion Re at Chantal Crousel gallery, which featured bunches of sellotaped dummies, their heads lined up on shelves. ‘Clearance’, ‘surplus’, ‘end of stock sale’, ‘liquidation’ – back in the streets the ads seem to pulsate behind the window’s glass, reminding me of the artist’s own motto: ‘energy: yes, quality: no’, and of some of his exhibition titles such as Too Too – Much Much for the 2010 show at the Museum Dhondt Dhaenens in Deurle, Belgium. In the lane leading to the studio, car wrecks, their bonnets wide open, are quickly fixed up for the black market. ‘That’s guerrilla mechanics’, says Hirschhorn, who has also tried his hand at makeshift engineering in Poor-Racer (2009), a pathetically modified car made of cardboard and aluminium, standing like a ridiculously competitive Christmas tree.

Hirschhorn’s day-to-day activity resembles the routine of the manufacturers, suppliers, importers and distributors settled in the area: like theirs, his work involves production, transport, storage and the managing of a team of assistants. The artist has chosen to leave Paris to move into a former factory in Aubervilliers, a North Eastern suburb of the capital. He proudly shows me the garage door linking his storage space to the street: ‘I need to feel that my work can go out, that it’s connected with the outside world’, he tells me. ‘Here trucks can come, load and unload. In Paris, my studio was in a residential building, it felt like going to a flat.’

Work work work!

Visiting a studio, one often has the secret hope of stumbling upon new artworks, unpublished sketches or abandoned prototypes never shown before. But to visit Hirschhorn’s studio is a whole different ball game in that all it reveals is the work itself. In his practice, there’s no separation between working process and finished artwork. The studio’s inside and outside literally replicate the artist’s production. Visiting the artist’s studio echoes the experience of his exhibitions so strikingly that the two seem to merge. The suburban former factory feels like an organic continuation of the work in every aspect, even the most trivial ones – like the calendar of due dates, which is hand-drawn with same intense and determined style as the artist’s drawings. Hirschhorn’s ‘all-encompassing’ technique mirrors the formal profusion of his urban surroundings and of his own interior moods, which are as nervous and agitated as his edgy neighbourhood.

Hirschhorn’s lifestyle reflects his super-productive working method. He tells me that he thinks about his studio very often, particularly when he’s travelling. ‘I like to think about my studio, its shape, its space’, he says. ‘It’s a very important place, people only think about art but for me the work is everywhere and not only here. I’m not afraid to say that I’m work-obsessed. I’m in the studio every day. I also like to come here at the weekend, when the assistants are off. I even come sometimes not to do anything, just to hang out and look at things.’ Has Hirschhorn ever suffered from artist’s block? Felt discouraged or uninspired? ‘Never’, he says. ‘I’ve got no time for that. You have to carry on, to persevere, otherwise you won’t do anything. I’m for perseverance. All the great artists have persevered, take Warhol for example, or Beuys, or Mondrian.’ And anyway, considering Hirschhorn’s current schedule, he doesn’t really have the luxury of slowing down. The studio is a beehive-like superstructure. On the ground floor, things are produced and stored; gigantic working surfaces occupy the space and bits of installations are stacked up in the corners, waiting to be transported somewhere else or put away. The main space is pretty much taken up by a huge wooden structure, and assistants are building hundreds of cardboard logs for the forthcoming exhibition It's Burning Everywhere at the Kunsthalle Mannheim.

The first floor is dedicated to the administrative side of the operation: there, assistants deal with correspondence, look for new images on the web and archive past exhibitions. A folder for each show allows it to be precisely remade and re-installed without the artist being present. Texts written by Hirschhorn are stacked up in a corner – he is currently working on a book. But the studio isn’t exactly conducive to reading. ‘I can’t read here’, says Hirschhorn. ‘My library is at home. For me, the studio is first and foremost a space of production. And I don’t read that much’, he adds. ‘I’m lucky enough to have philosopher friends who do the thinking for me and send me short books.’

Department Stores

Hirschhorn’s favourite place is on the ground floor, behind a big raised desk that allows him to see everything at once, like a conductor on his podium. His exhibitions function according to the same logic of the whole: the eye sweeps over a total installation without being able to make out individual works. The assistants, scissors in hand, sift through news magazines (Time, Newsweek, The Economist, Nouvel Observateur...). Hundreds of torn-out pages carpet the floor. The cut-out images are kept in cardboard boxes, lined up against the wall as if in a shop. Each one is labelled with a theme written in capital letters with a black felt-tip pen: MONUMENTS, ALTARS, TERRORISTS, PRISONERS, WOOD, GYM, WORK, TATOOS, SADDAM HUSSEIN, NATURAL FIRE, DESTRUCTIVE FIRE, COUNTRYSIDE FIRE ... The rows of stacked up boxes have something of the stalls, booths and vitrines reoccurring in the artist’s works, as, for example, in his 24 heures Foucault shown at the Palais de Tokyo in 2004. From his very first collages on notebooks to his more recent 3D installations, Hirschhorn has always insisted on the importance of the terms ‘layout’ and ‘display’ to describe his work – a work whose overarching logic is to link disparate elements and to create a continuous motif in space.

At the back of the studio, a large instruction panel details the various steps of an exhibition hang. Dozens of small images are sellotaped on it, showing the installation in minute detail, and captions written in black felt-tip pen and ballpoint pen identify each fragment of the display. Large sketches of this kind, to be found everywhere in the studio, very much resemble Hirschhorn’s wall pieces such as Wall Documentation (1995), which documents his practice up to 1995. In light of the artist’s entire production, the instruction panel mentioned above thus becomes an artwork, reminiscent of the draft-like aesthetic of Hirschhorn’s early pieces: the hand-written titles and captions, the quick corrections, capital letters, underlined words, arrows, black felt-tip, ball-point pen, sellotape. Upstairs, another hand-drawn big panel (bearing the categories ‘what to do’, ‘what to buy’) organises the steps to be taken for the current project: the Swiss Pavilion at the Venice Biennale.

Crystal Museum

The Venice show is articulated around the motif of crystal, and a gigantic sketch entitled Crystal of Resistance details the preparatory iconographic research. ‘It’s the very first time I’ve worked with this material’, says Hirschhorn. ‘I find it very interesting because it’s both very mundane but has countless uses. There are crystals inside the ear, in mobile phones, on jewellery, in glass. I also like its esoteric and philosophical connotations. Paul Klee used to think that crystals represented perfection in art.’ Hirschhorn has gathered a hundred images and text snippets which help him remember the exhibition’s various shapes: they picture a crystal meth laboratory, stalactites, a gym, or else a man eating alone in his living room. ‘I’m fascinated by this image’, says the artist. ‘This man eats alone in front of a head lying on the table, next to a pile of medicines. His fireplace, full to the brim with domestic objects, has something of a domestic altar. I’m interested in this organised chaos as an ensemble.’ Among the books on rocks and minerals lying on the studio table, Hirschhorn is particularly taken by the catalogue of a crystal museum from his native Switzerland and he has analysed its display techniques with great attention. ‘The show in Venice is a mix between the décor of an alpine crystal museum, a country disco, a third rate sci-fi film and a clandestine crystal meth laboratory’, he explains. ‘But crystal is only a motif, the theme is resistance. I want to show that resistance is interesting in itself. It is often discussed as being "against" something, but one forgets that resistance can also be "for" something. It’s a positive and intense movement – of belief, of birth, of production and of creation.’

Hirschhorn’s project, which, like crystal, is a precise accumulation of hundreds of elements, will continue to grow for the next few months. Bit by bit, crystal in all its different shapes invades the studio like the concretions and outgrowths in the artist’s work (even though he insists on their difference: crystal is mineral, concretion organic). Rhizome, confusion, contamination, information, accumulation, the artist deploys the same strategy in his work and in his studio. The outside is mirrored inside, the container reflects the content and everything is work. Visiting Hirschhorn’s studio, one cannot escape a feeling of déjà-vu, the feeling to be experiencing not only the working process but also the artwork itself. The energy invested in the production of the works is so optimised that everything is used up. ‘If when you die when you haven’t given it all, it’s a bit of a waste. It’s just like with athletes. That’s why I really admire Paul McCarthy, not only his work but also his whole character. He’s 65 and he lives 100%, he really goes for it!’

IMAGE CREDITS
Photographies prises dans l'atelier de Thomas Hirschhorn, 2011 Photographe : Florence Ostende

Français

MÉCANIQUE SAUVAGE

L'atelier de Thomas Hirschhorn

Florence Ostende

C’est en banlieue parisienne à Aubervilliers, ville multiculturelle et ouvrière, ancien bastion communiste et berceau de l’industrialisation en Île-de-France, que Thomas Hirschhorn a installé son atelier. Fidèle à son image de travailleur acharné, l’artiste investit corps et âme cette superstructure fourmilière où il prépare actuellement le pavillon suisse de la Biennale de Venise.

Une visite de l'atelier de Thomas Hirschhorn commence sans doute déjà dehors, dans les rues parallèles. Les magasins de grossistes y épuisent leurs stocks d'ordinateurs, sacs, chaussures, bijoux et vêtements, les mannequins défilent derrière les vitrines. J'ai l'impression de revivre l'exposition Concretion Re à la galerie Chantal Crousel en 2007 : les rangées de corps inanimés scotchés les uns aux autres, les têtes alignées sur les étagères. "Liquidation", "surplus", "fin de série", "déstockage", les formules publicitaires pullulent dans les vitrines et me rappellent le célèbre slogan de l'artiste "Énergie oui, qualité non" et certains de ses titres d'expositions comme Too Too – Much Much en 2010 au Museum Dhondt Dhaenens à Deurle en Belgique. Dans la rue qui mène à l'atelier, capots ouverts, des épaves de voitures sont bidouillées à la va-vite pour le marché noir. "C'est de la mécanique sauvage !", commente Hirschhorn qui pratique aussi le bricolage automobile dans Poor-Racer (2009), une pauvre voiture de tuning en carton et aluminium, misérable sapin de Noël de compétition.

De la production au transport, du stockage à la vente en passant par la gestion d'une équipe d'assistants, l'activité quotidienne d'Hirschhorn n'est pas si éloignée de celle des fabricants, fournisseurs, importateurs et distributeurs installés dans son quartier. L'artiste a volontairement quitté son atelier parisien pour venir s'installer dans une ancienne usine en banlieue nord-est de la capitale, à Aubervilliers. Il montre fièrement la grande porte de garage qui relie son espace de stockage à la rue : "J'ai besoin de sentir que mon travail peut sortir, qu'il est connecté à l'extérieur. Ici les camions peuvent venir, charger, décharger. À Paris, mon atelier se trouvait dans un immeuble, j'avais l'impression d'entrer dans un appartement."

Work work work!

Les visites d'atelier nourrissent souvent l'espoir caché de découvrir des pièces inconnues jamais exposées, des travaux préparatoires inédits ou des prototypes abandonnés. L'expérience de celui d'Hirschhorn est une autre affaire, dans le sens où il ne donne rien d'autre à voir que le travail lui-même. L'intérieur et l'extérieur de l'atelier dupliquent son œuvre de façon littérale. L'effet de miroir entre la visite d'atelier et l'expérience de ses expositions est saisissant, elles semblent fusionner. Cette ancienne usine de banlieue est le prolongement organique de l'œuvre jusque dans ses moindres détails, y compris dans sa fonctionnalité la plus triviale – par exemple, un banal calendrier des échéances fait main, dans le même style dense et déterminé que ses dessins. La méthode "totalisante" de l’artiste imite la profusion formelle de son environnement urbain et les humeurs intérieures, agitées et nerveuses, de son voisinage humain, lui aussi dans l'urgence.

Le mode de vie d'Hirschhorn est à l'image de sa production, inépuisable. Il avoue très souvent penser à son atelier, en particulier lorsqu'il voyage : "J'aime réfléchir à sa forme, à son espace. C'est un lieu important car on ne pense qu'à l'art mais pour moi, le travail est partout, pas seulement ici. Je suis un travailleur et je le revendique. Je viens ici tous les jours, j'aime m'y rendre le weekend quand les assistants ne sont pas là. Je viens parfois même pour ne rien faire, juste pour traîner et regarder." Hirschhorn a-t-il déjà connu l'angoisse de la page blanche ? Une petite déprime passagère ? Le manque d'inspiration ? "Jamais", affirme-t-il, "on n'a pas le temps de cultiver cela. Il faut insister et persévérer, sinon on arrive à rien. Je suis pour la persévérance. Tous les grands artistes ont persévéré, Warhol, Beuys, Mondrian." Vu son emploi du temps actuel, il serait malheureux que le corps ou l'esprit le lâche. L'atelier d'Hirschhorn est une fourmilière. Au rez-de-chaussée, on produit, on stocke : de gigantesques plans de travail occupent l'espace et des fragments d'installations s'entassent dans les coins, en attendant un imminent transport ou un espace de stockage. Une énorme structure en bois occupe tout l'espace central, les assistants construisent des centaines de rondins en carton pour l'exposition It's Burning Everywhere à la Kunsthalle Mannheim.

À l'étage, on gère la correspondance, recherche de nouvelles images sur l’Internet, archive les expositions passées. Chaque dossier permet de pouvoir refaire l'exposition et de piloter à distance son accrochage. Dans un coin, les textes écrits par l'artiste sont empilés, un livre est en préparation. En revanche, l'atelier n'est pas propice au temps de lecture : "Je n'arrive pas à lire ici, ma bibliothèque est à la maison, l'atelier est surtout un espace de production pour moi. Et puis je ne lis pas tant que ça ! J'ai la chance d'avoir des amis philosophes qui réfléchissent pour moi et m'envoient de petits livres !".

Grands magasins

Son espace préféré est au rez-de-chaussée, derrière un très grand bureau en hauteur placé de telle façon qu' Hirschhorn peut garder, tel un chef d'orchestre, une vision d'ensemble. Ses expositions obéissent d'ailleurs à cette même logique de l'ensemble : le regard balaye une totalité sans pouvoir identifier d'œuvres individuelles. Ciseaux à la main, les assistants épluchent tous les magazines d'actualités (Times, Newsweek, The Economist, Nouvel Observateur...). Des centaines de pages déchirées tapissent le sol. Les images découpées sont conservées dans des boîtes en carton, alignées contre le mur comme dans un magasin. Chaque boîte est marquée d'un thème écrit en majuscules au gros feutre noir épais : monuments, autels, terrorists, prisonniers, bois, gym, travail, tatoos, sadam hussein, feu naturel, feu destruction, feu de campagne... Les rangées de boîtes évoquent les stands, étals et vitrines récurrents dans le travail de l'artiste, on pense aux boîtes superposées dans les salles de 24 heures Foucault au Palais de Tokyo en 2004. Des premiers collages sur cahiers aux œuvres tridimensionnelles, Hirschhorn insiste depuis toujours sur l'importance des termes "layout" (mise en page) et "display" (mise en espace) pour décrire son travail dont la logique est de relier différents éléments entre eux et d'assurer la continuité d'un motif dans l'espace.

Au fond, un grand panneau d'instructions documente minutieusement les étapes d'un montage d'exposition afin que les assistants puissent reconstituer son assemblage complexe. Des dizaines de petites images fixées au scotch permettent de visualiser le moindre détail de l'ensemble ; les légendes écrites au marqueur noir ou au stylo à bille d'identifier chaque fragment de l'installation. Ces nombreux schémas présents dans l'atelier ressemblent à s'y méprendre à certains panneaux muraux comme Wall documentation (1995) qui retrace toute la documentation de son travail jusqu'en 1995. Ainsi, ce banal panneau fait œuvre à la lumière de l'ensemble de sa production artistique et rappelle l'esthétique brouillonne de ses premiers collages : titres et légendes manuscrites, style d'écriture nerveux, sommaire et expéditif, retouches grossières, lettres majuscules, mots soulignés, flèches, marqueur épais noir, stylos à bille, scotch, etc... À l'étage, un autre grand tableau tracé à la main (avec les catégories "quoi faire", "quoi acheter") organise les étapes logistiques du grand chantier actuel : le pavillon suisse de la Biennale de Venise.

Musée du cristal

Le gigantesque schéma intitulé Crystal of Resistance détaille les recherches iconographiques de l'exposition vénitienne placée sous le motif du cristal. "C'est la première fois que je travaille sur ce matériau. Il m'intéresse car il est très banal et à la fois très riche dans son utilisation. Il y a des cristaux dans l'oreille, les téléphones portables, les bijoux, le verre... J'aime aussi ses résonnances ésotériques et philosophiques, Paul Klee pensait que les cristaux représentaient la perfection de l'art." Hirschhorn a assemblé une centaine d'images et de fragments de textes qui l'aident à mémoriser les différentes formes de l'exposition : un laboratoire de crystal meth, des stalactites, un club de fitness ou encore la photographie d'un homme seul en train de manger dans son salon. "Cette photographie me fascine. Cet homme seul mange seul devant une tête posée sur la table, à côté d'une pyramide de médicaments. Sa cheminée bourrée d'objets ressemble à un autel domestique. Ce chaos organisé m'intéresse comme un ensemble". Parmi les livres sur les roches et les minéraux étalés sur la table, Hirschhorn porte une attention particulière au catalogue d'un musée du cristal en Suisse. Il analyse rigoureusement ses techniques muséographiques : "L’exposition de la Biennale de Venise est un mélange entre le décor d’un musée du cristal de montagne, une discothèque de campagne, un mauvais film de science fiction et un atelier clandestin de crystal meth. Mais le cristal n'est qu'un motif, le thème, c'est la résistance. Je veux montrer que la résistance est intéressante en tant que telle. On parle souvent de résistance 'contre' quelque chose mais on oublie que la résistance est aussi 'pour'. C'est un mouvement positif, de croyance, de naissance, de production, de création et d'intensité."

La structure du cristal, formée d'un empilement ordonné d'un grand nombre d'atomes, continuera de croître pour quelques mois encore. Par petites touches, le cristal sous toutes ses formes envahit l’arrangement spatial de l’atelier, semblable aux concrétions et excroissances qu’Hirschhorn a fréquemment utilisé (même s’il insiste sur leur différence : le cristal est minéral, la concrétion est organique). Rhizome, confusion, contamination, information, accumulation, les stratégies à l'œuvre dans sa production sont identiques à celles de son lieu d'activité. Le dehors contamine le dedans, le contenant reflète le contenu, tout devient travail. La visite de la "manufacture Hirschhorn" révèle une sensation de déjà-vu, l'impression de ne pas seulement traverser le processus de production de son œuvre mais l'œuvre elle-même. L’énergie investie dans la fabrication des pièces est optimisée jusqu’à ce qu’il ne reste plus rien : "Si tu meurs et que tu n'as pas tout donné, c'est raté, c'est un peu bête et j'aime ça, comme chez les sportifs. C'est pour ça que j'admire Paul McCarthy, son travail mais aussi le personnage, il a 65 ans et il vit à fond la caisse, il y va !"

IMAGE CREDITS
Photographies prises dans l'atelier de Thomas Hirschhorn, 2011 Photographe : Florence Ostende
 
advertisement advertisement advertisement