artwork image
artwork image
artwork image
artwork image
artwork image
artwork image
artwork image

English

The Institute of Social Hypocrisy

Damien Airault

Damien Airault was locked up for a whole week inside the Institute of Social Hypocrisy, one of the very few artist-run spaces in the French capital. After such an experience he’s well positioned to explore the intentions of this mysterious venue nestled at the heart of the Marais.

That night, there were about twenty people around, and they all spoke Norwegian – rather surprising for central Paris. I grabbed a beer, heard a bearded guy shouting in English that ‘it was about to start’ and sat down against the wall like everybody else. It was my first time at The Institute of Social Hypocrisy. The guy introduced the speaker – in English – saying how delighted he was to welcome the anthropologist Theodor Barth who was about to give a lecture on ‘I am not: a Jew (I exist) – I’m not talking about a calculated space – nor of the space for calculations – I’m talking about a place where someone I know took me’.

His presentation was a whirlpool of ideas including the status of Jewish people during the war in the former Yugoslavia, Hebrew symbols, Giorgio Agamben, Emmanuel Levinas, Nicolas Bourriaud, linguistic diagrams, aesthetic speculations, methods of cross referencing in sociology, what had to be read upside down, what can be read both ways or from bottom to top. A few members of the public dozed off, but most of them looked quite happy, acquiring food for thought for the following few weeks at least.

An hour and half this went on. The bearded guy tried to stop the lecture, but the speaker harshly answered that his presentation was nowhere near finished. Tension rose as the two men started a polite argument. The ambiance turned weird, we had no idea what was acted, what wasn’t, what was real, what was made up. A lecture on identity in a place called ‘The Institute of Social Hypocrisy’ can be an unsettling event indeed.

Ambiguous situations

A regular at The Institute of Social Hypocrisy (as if, like beauty, hairdressing or contemporary art, deception could be granted its own institute), I soon became used to these kinds of ambiguous situations. The ISH is both a satire of the traditional exhibition space and an artist studio. It’s an unstable place where nothing is credible even though the apparatus of the artistic institution is perfectly imitated. There’s a white cube-type space, alcohol is served during the private views, there are very official looking business cards, a simple and elegant website, headed paper, and a flag on the façade – in short, all the elements are there to give the impression of a contemporary art space managed by professionals. Here, the word ‘hypocrisy’ isn’t a provocation but a communications trick used to advertise an ambitious discourse and a coherent ensemble. The artist behind all this, Victor Boullet, dreamt up a context to promote and support his own practice, this very context becoming in turn an integral part of his work. At ISH, everything ought to be thought of as a performance.

Hypocrisy is ISH’s governing principle. It gives an absolute freedom to those who dare to use it openly. Everything at ISH is shown and thought of through this prism. Hypocrisy, lie, trickery can be very meaningful postulates when one thinks of the modes of interpretation of the work of art. They highlight the gap between gesture and words, words and thoughts, thoughts and gesture. Attempting to understand Victor Boullet’s intentions (or the intentions of his guests) leads straight into a dead end: one has to confront the project head on, without trying to pre-empt the various actors’ objectives or their moral position.

In someone else’ s nest

To finish, I cannot resist talking about a project in which I was personally involved, even though the idea didn’t come from me. ‘The Brooding Parasite Feeding Week’ was conceived in November 2010 by Victor Boullet at The ISH and at the small gallery of which I’m director, Le Commissariat. Suffice to say that I ended up confined to the Institute for a whole week. For seven days and seven nights, Victor fed me at fixed times with dishes all based on whale meat. In order to get them, I had to attach a basket to a rope and send it down to the street from the second floor where The ISH is located. Victor had left me enough to live with minimum comfort: I had a mattress and a couple of sheets, coffee, tea, alcohol and bits of toiletries. Stuck behind a security door, I also had a phone and a computer connected to the Internet. Beforehand, Victor had asked me for the Commissariat’s keys, and during my incarceration he covered its shop window with images of birds – cuckoos, to be precise.

The animal metaphor could easily become a symbol for ISH’s modus operandi: first there’s a species known to steal the nest of others, dispose of them and pose as a fledgling in order to be fed by the female bird (the cuckoo); then there’s a threatened species, protected against hunting, whose meat, distributed illegally, is particularly tender (the whale). Combining the aesthetic of plagiarism with the one of spoliation, the ISH is a project where savagery serves intelligence – and vice-versa.

IMAGE CREDITS
Theodor Barth occupies The Institute of Social Hypocrisy, I Am Not a Jew (I Exist) Occupancy, talk and residency program. 1st October 2009 – 5th October 2009

The Flag of The Institute of Social Hypocrisy, 2009 Hand Stitched Satin 80 x 100cm

The Obituary Phenomenon Ernst Beyeler (2010) The Institute of Social Hypocrisy, Paris Installation view

Dear Dr. Jacobsen, 2011 2nd Cannons vitrine Los Angeles, US Installation view

Victor Boullet, Performance with flag, Berlin, 2011 Photo: Iselin Linstad Hauge

Brooding Parasite Feeding Week, 2010 Curator pulling up basket of food

The EctoParasite Hymn, Le Commissariat, 2010 Installation view

Français

The Institute of Social Hypocrisy

Damien Airault

Damien Airault est resté enfermé une semaine dans l'Institute of Social Hypocrisy, l'un des rares "artist-run spaces" à Paris. Une expérience qui en fait la personne toute désignée pour révéler les intentions de ce lieu mystérieux situé au cœur du Marais.

Les personnes présentes (une vingtaine environ) parlent toutes norvégien, ce qui a de quoi surprendre en plein Paris. Je prends une bière, j'entends un homme barbu annoncer en anglais "ça va commencer". Je m’assois contre un mur pour faire comme tout le monde. C’est la première fois que je viens à l’Institute of Social Hypocrisy. L'homme fait les présentations, toujours en anglais, et se dit heureux d’accueillir l'anthropologue Theodor Barth qui va nous présenter sa conférence "Je ne suis pas : un juif (j’existe) - Je ne parle pas d’un espace calculé - ni de l’espace des calculs - je parle d’un lieu où quelqu’un m’a mené"…

Les flux d’idées qui s’entremêlent dans sa présentation vont à une vitesse folle, entre le statut des peuples juifs pendant la guerre d’ex-Yougoslavie, les symboles hébreux, Giorgio Agamben, Emmanuel Levinas, Nicolas Bourriaud, les diagrammes de linguistique, les spéculations esthétiques, les modes de recoupement en sociologie, ce qu’il faut lire à l’envers, ce qui se lit dans les deux sens ou de bas en haut. Malgré quelques individus endormis, le public a l'air content, l’esprit alimenté, de quoi réfléchir pendant quelques semaines au moins.

Une heure et demie passe. L'homme à la barbe veut arrêter la conférence mais le conférencier rétorque que la présentation est loin d’être terminée. Le ton monte, on assiste à une dispute polie. L’ambiance devient bizarre. On ne sait plus ce qui est de l’ordre du joué ou du non-joué, de la mise en scène ou du réel. Une conférence sur l’identité dans un lieu nommé "Institut d’Hypocrisie Sociale" peut désarçonner.

Situations ambiguës

The Institute of Social Hypocrisy (comme si, au même titre que la beauté, la coiffure ou l’art contemporain, le mensonge avait droit à son Institut) va, par la suite, m’habituer à ce genre de situations ambiguës. À la fois satire de lieu d’exposition institutionnel et atelier d’artiste, l'ISH est un espace instable où plus rien n’est crédible, bien que l’ingénierie de l’institution artistique soit ici parfaitement imitée. Un espace type white cube, de l’alcool aux vernissages, des cartes de visite, un site internet sobre et élégant, du papier à en-tête et un étendard sur la façade extérieure, donnent automatiquement l’apparence d’un lieu d’art contemporain géré par des professionnels. Dans ce contexte, le terme "hypocrisie" n’est plus une provocation, mais bien une astuce de communication employée au service d’un propos assez travaillé et d’un ensemble cohérent. L’artiste qui l’a conçu, Victor Boullet, travaille à la construction d'un support qui défend et met en valeur sa pratique, ce même support devenant partie intégrante de son propre travail. Nous sommes dans un lieu qui doit être pensé comme une performance.

L’hypocrisie est le principe de base de l'ISH. Elle donne la liberté la plus totale à celui ou celle qui en use ouvertement. Tout ce qui est montré, pensé, dans l’ISH traverse ce prisme. L’hypocrisie, le mensonge, la fourberie comme leitmotive deviennent des postulats lourds de sens quand on considère les modes d’interprétation de l’œuvre d’art. C’est la revendication d’une fracture entre geste et parole, entre parole et pensée, entre pensée et geste. Tenter de comprendre les intentions de Victor Boullet (ou de ses invités) mène l’interprète dans une impasse : il doit se faire un jugement sur pièces, sans présager des objectifs et de la position morale des intervenants.

Voler le nid des autres

Pour finir, je ne peux résister à l’envie de parler d’un projet auquel j’ai participé activement, sans en être ni l’inventeur ni l’initiateur : "The Brooding Parasite Feeding Week" conçu en novembre 2010 par Victor Boullet à l’ISH et dans la petite galerie que je dirige, Le Commissariat. Disons simplement que je me suis retrouvé enfermé pendant une semaine à l’intérieur de l’Institut. Pendant sept jours et sept nuits, Victor m'a nourri à heures fixes de plats ayant tous pour aliment de base la viande de baleine. Du deuxième étage où se trouve l’ISH, je faisais descendre un panier dans la rue à l’aide d’une corde. Il m’avait laissé de quoi vivre sommairement : un matelas et quelques draps, une réserve de café, de thé, d’alcool et quelques produits d’hygiène. Coincé derrière une porte blindée, j’avais un téléphone et un ordinateur connecté à internet. Victor m’avait préalablement demandé les clés du Commissariat et a utilisé mon incarcération pour maroufler la vitrine de photocopies d'images d'oiseaux, plus précisément, de coucous.

La métaphore animalière pourrait devenir le symbole du modus operandi de l’ISH : entre une espèce qui s’est fait une spécialité de voler le nid des autres, de les trucider au passage, afin de se faire passer pour un oisillon nourri par l'oiseau femelle, celle-ci n’y voyant que du feu (le coucou), et une espèce menacée, interdite à la chasse, et dont la viande, circulant en contrebande, est extrêmement délicate (la baleine). Cumulant une esthétique du plagiat et de la spoliation, l’ISH est un projet où la sauvagerie est mise au service de l’intelligence, et vice-versa.

IMAGE CREDITS
Theodor Barth occupies The Institute of Social Hypocrisy, I Am Not a Jew (I Exist) Occupancy, talk and residency program. 1st October 2009 – 5th October 2009

The Flag of The Institute of Social Hypocrisy, 2009 Hand Stitched Satin 80 x 100cm

The Obituary Phenomenon Ernst Beyeler (2010) The Institute of Social Hypocrisy, Paris Installation view

Dear Dr. Jacobsen, 2011 2nd Cannons vitrine Los Angeles, US Installation view

Victor Boullet, Performance with flag, Berlin, 2011 Photo: Iselin Linstad Hauge

Brooding Parasite Feeding Week, 2010 Curator pulling up basket of food

The EctoParasite Hymn, Le Commissariat, 2010 Installation view

 
advertisement advertisement advertisement