artwork image
artwork image
artwork image
artwork image
artwork image
artwork image
artwork image
artwork image
artwork image

English

Exhibition memory

Rirkrit Tiravanija: A Retrospective

Teresa Gleadowe

Magazines are full of current stories, shows recently opened or just finished. Still infused with the writer’s visit, the articles are ‘news’. Catalogue takes here a different approach, experimenting with exhibition chronicles written years after the show, shaped by the remembering process. Curator Teresa Gleadowe selected for us Rirkrit Tiravanija’ s retrospective shown at the Couvent des Cordeliers and at the Serpentine Gallery in 2005.

Trawling for exhibition memories – so many fragments and half-remembered narratives – I thought of writing about an exhibition that, like Catalogue, had one foot in Paris and one in London. An exhibition by Rirkrit Tiravanija came to mind. It was shown during February and March 2005 in Paris at the Couvent des Cordeliers and in July of the same year at London’s Serpentine Gallery. I had seen another exhibition in the Couvent, a selection of films by Anri Sala presented in a kind of twilight atmosphere so that one moved through an overall grey space rather than into black boxes (I seem to remember that the press release described the light as ‘crepuscular’). I digress of course, but not entirely so, for both the Sala and the Tiravanija exhibitions were curated by the Musée d’Art Moderne’s Laurence Bossé and Hans Ulrich Obrist, and involved rethinking the structure of a solo show.

Nothing there

Tiravanija’s exhibition was presented as a retrospective – but a retrospective in which, we had been warned, ‘works will not be shown per se’, a retrospective that was ‘a return to [the artist’s] former works without presenting the objects themselves’. I remember reading these statements and being puzzled and intrigued; what could an exhibition be without any work? Tiravanija had built walls that replicated the Musée d’Art Moderne’s modernist galleries as closely as possible, and a selection of seven exhibitions were supposedly ‘installed’ in these partitioned spaces – but physically there was nothing there. Tiravanija had invited the science fiction writer Bruce Sterling and the artist Philippe Parreno to collaborate with him on the creation of a ‘mental universe’: Sterling’s personal account of Tiravanija’s work (The Rirkrit Tiravanija Retrospective (Yesterday Will Be Another Day)) emanated from speakers set in the walls of the constructed spaces, while Parreno’s abstract vision (Sitcom Ghost) was recited by comedians at timed intervals throughout the day, and Tiravanija performed an account of the seven exhibitions as a guided tour. Thus the exhibition was itself conceived as an exhibition memory.

At the Serpentine Gallery, the exhibition took a very different form, the most memorable elements being the creation of two plywood replicas of Tiravanija’s walk-up apartment in New York positioned as mirror images of each other. Another space was fitted out as a studio from which was broadcast a radio play that dramatised and fictionalised the artist’s life. This play followed the adventures of two time-travellers who projected themselves back to visit several of the artist’s early exhibitions. On the other hand, the apartments were experienced entirely in the present. Each had a fully stocked kitchen, a small bedroom and a slightly larger room with a sofa, two chairs and a large-screen TV. The Serpentine’s audience simply moved into these spaces, making themselves comfortable enough to catch the latest tennis from Wimbledon, have a nap in the bedroom, or cook up a meal.

One-man show

I confess that my recollection of these exhibitions is not entirely forthcoming – I remember my questions about the exhibition at the Couvent des Cordeliers more accurately than I remember the exhibition itself. And I remember an illuminating conversation between Liam Gillick and Tiravanija at the Goethe Institute perhaps as much as I remember the Serpentine exhibition. I also recall sitting in a cross-legged circle in Kensington Gardens with a group of students from the Curating Course at the Royal College of Art, talking to Rirkrit about how he liked to work and about his relationships with curators. This was the beginning of a discussion on whether a group of curators could productively work together with a single artist, and what it might be like to pursue such a goal – perhaps the beginning of a journey that found a culmination recently in the exhibition John Smith - Solo Show, put together in March 2010 by the RCA Curating Course.

Tiravanija’s exhibition in Paris could be seen as le vide to John Bock’s le plein – that is, Bock’s extraordinary Klutterkammer exhibition, a kind of mind map in physical form at London’s Institute of Contemporary Arts in the autumn of 2004. Both made me think about the format of the one-person show – especially the retrospective – and about the contradictions inherent in any attempt to achieve a definitive summation of an artist’s work. Thinking again about Tiravanija, I also realise that I have never been able to experience one of his exhibitions as he seems to have first intended – I have lost (and perhaps never had) the state of innocence that’s required to live in Tiravanija’s continuous present. I cannot imagine joining the residents of Cologne who had baths, prepared dinners, or held birthday parties in an earlier recreation of the artist’s New York apartment at the Cologne Kunstverein in 1996. By the time Tiravanija’s retrospective hit the Serpentine, it felt like a staged re-enactment of these social situations, impossible to enter – a simulacrum. But I am still haunted by a desire to remember and re-visit the absences of the Couvent des Cordeliers retrospective, an exhibition that seems all the more powerful in recollection precisely because of its twenty-first century self-consciousness and awkward ironies.

IMAGE CREDITS

Rirkrit Tiravanija, A Retrospective (Tomorrow is Another Fine Day), 2005, Couvent des Cordeliers, Paris Copyright Marc Domage

Rirkrit Tiravanija, A Retrospective (Tomorrow is Another Fine Day), 2005, Couvent des Cordeliers, Paris Copyright Marc Domage

Rirkrit Tiravanija, A Retrospective (Tomorrow is Another Fine Day), 2005, Couvent des Cordeliers, Paris Copyright Marc Domage

Rirkrit Tiravanija, A Retrospective (Tomorrow is Another Fine Day), 2005, Couvent des Cordeliers, Paris Copyright Marc Domage

Rirkrit Tiravanija, A Retrospective (Tomorrow is Another Fine Day), 2005, Couvent des Cordeliers, Paris Copyright Marc Domage

Rirkrit Tiravanija, (please do not turn off the radio if you want to live well in the next fifteen minutes), 2005 Installation view, A Retrospective (Tomorrow is Another Fine Day), Serpentine Gallery, London ©2005 Rirkrit Tiravanija Photo: Hugo Glendinning

Rirkrit Tiravanija, Untitled (apartment 21) Installation view, A Retrospective (Tomorrow is Another Fine Day), 2005, Serpentine Gallery, London ©2005 Rirkrit Tiravanija Photo: Hugo Glendinning

Rirkrit Tiravanija, Untitled (apartment 21) Installation view, A Retrospective (Tomorrow is Another Fine Day), 2005, Serpentine Gallery, London ©2005 Rirkrit Tiravanija Photo: Hugo Glendinning

Rirkrit Tiravanija, Installation view, A Retrospective (Tomorrow is Another Fine Day), 2005, Serpentine Gallery, London ©2005 Rirkrit Tiravanija Photo: Hugo Glendinning

Français

L'exposition différée

Rirkrit Tiravanija : Une rétrospective

Teresa Gleadowe

Les revues d'art rendent souvent compte d'expositions qui viennent d'ouvrir ou de s'achever. Le récit demeure d'actualité, encore imprégné de la récente visite de l'auteur. Catalogue a voulu tenter l'expérience inverse : une chronique d'exposition en différé qui, plusieurs années après, aurait subi les altérations de la mémoire. Que garde-t-on de l'expérience d'une exposition ? Teresa Gleadowe, commissaire d'exposition, s'est livrée à l'exercice en choisissant la rétrospective de Rirkrit Tiravanija organisée à Paris par le Musée d’Art Moderne de la Ville de Paris/ARC au Couvent des Cordeliers et à Londres par la Serpentine Gallery en 2005.

En fouillant dans mes souvenirs d'expositions, des tas de fragments et de bribes d'histoires ont refait surface. Je voulais écrire ce texte sur une exposition qui, dans le même esprit que Catalogue, aurait eu lieu à Paris et à Londres. Organisée à Paris au Couvent des Cordeliers en février-mars 2005 et à la Serpentine Gallery de Londres en juillet de la même année, l'exposition de Rirkrit Tiravanija m'est venue à l'esprit. J'avais déjà eu l'occasion de visiter une exposition au Couvent : une sélection de films d'Anri Sala présentée non pas dans les traditionnelles boîtes noires mais dans une sorte de pénombre omniprésente, une atmosphère en grisaille qui envahissait tout l'espace (je crois même me souvenir que le communiqué de presse décrivait cette lumière comme "crépusculaire"). Je digresse mais pas complètement puisque ces deux expositions, organisées par Laurence Bossé et Hans Ulrich Obrist du Musée d'Art Moderne, avaient pour ambition de repenser le format de l'exposition monographique.

Rien à voir

On nous avait annoncé l'exposition de Tiravanija comme une rétrospective et on nous avait prévenu que “les œuvres ne seraient pas montrées telles quelles” : la rétrospective présenterait "un retour aux œuvres passées sans la présence matérielle d'objets". Je me souviens avoir été intriguée et surprise à la lecture de ces propos : à quoi peut ressembler une exposition sans œuvres d'art ? Tiravanija avait fait construire des cimaises qui reprenaient l'architecture moderniste du Musée d'Art Moderne. Il avait sélectionné sept expositions qu'il avait soi-disant "installées" dans ces différents espaces fragmentés mais concrètement, il n'y avait rien à voir. Tiravanija avait invité l'auteur de science-fiction Bruce Sterling et l'artiste Philippe Parreno à créer un "univers mental" autour de l'exposition. Sterling avait imaginé un compte-rendu subjectif inspiré de l'œuvre de Tiravanija (The Rirkrit Tiravanija Retrospective (Yesterday Will Be Another Day)) diffusé par des enceintes disposées sur les cimaises. Des comédiens récitaient la vision abstraite de Parreno (Sitcom Ghost) à différents moments de la journée. Tiravanija avait écrit un compte-rendu de ses sept expositions qu'il retransmettait au public sous forme de visites guidées performées. L'exposition elle-même était conçue comme un souvenir d'exposition.

À la Serpentine Gallery, l'exposition était complètement différente. J'avais été marquée par les deux répliques en contreplaqué de son appartement new-yorkais, l'une étant le miroir de l'autre. Il y avait aussi une autre pièce aménagée en atelier dans laquelle on pouvait écouter une fiction radiophonique inspirée de la vie de Tiravanija. On suivait les aventures de deux personnes qui voyagent dans le temps et se projettent dans le passé pour visiter les premières expositions de l'artiste. On rentrait dans le passé de Tiravanija tout en faisant l'expérience de son appartement dédoublé dans le temps présent. Chaque partie possédait une cuisine entièrement équipée, une petite chambre et une pièce un peu plus grande avec un canapé, deux chaises et un téléviseur grand écran. Les visiteurs de la Serpentine allaient et venaient entre ces différents espaces : ils se mettaient à l'aise pour regarder le dernier match de Wimbledon, faire la sieste dans la chambre ou faire la cuisine.

Une exposition personnelle

Je dois avouer que je me souviens assez mal de ces deux expositions – je me souviens bien mieux des questions que je me suis posées après la visite, en particulier celle du Couvent des Cordeliers. Je me souviens d'une conversation passionnante entre Liam Gillick et Tiravanija au Goethe Institute au moins autant, sinon mieux, que de l'exposition de la Serpentine. Je me souviens aussi être assise en tailleur à Kensington Gardens avec un groupe d'étudiants de la formation curatoriale du Royal College of Art en train de parler avec Rirkrit de sa façon de travailler et de sa relation avec les commissaires d'exposition. On se demandait si un groupe de commissaires pouvait travailler de façon productive avec un seul artiste et à quoi cela aboutirait si on menait l'expérience jusqu'au bout – c'était le début d'une réflexion qui a récemment abouti à l'exposition John Smith - Solo Show, organisée en mars 2010 par les étudiants du Curating Course au RCA.

On pourrait dire que l'exposition de Tiravanija à Paris est la version contemporaine du Vide d'Yves Klein (1958) dont le contrepoint, Le Plein d'Arman (1960), serait aujourd'hui l'extraordinaire exposition Klutterkammer de John Bock, une sorte de cartographie mentale présentée à l'Institute of Contemporary Arts de Londres (automne 2004). Ces deux expositions envisagent différentes façons de repenser le format de l'exposition monographique, en particulier celui de la rétrospective et les contradictions inhérentes à toute tentative de “résumer” l'œuvre d'un artiste. Quand je pense à Tiravanija, je me rends compte que je n'ai pas fait l'expérience de ses premières expositions et donc de ses intentions initiales : j'ai perdu à jamais l'innocence nécessaire pour vivre son œuvre au temps présent, une innocence que je n'ai sans doute jamais eue. Je n'arrive pas à m'imaginer en compagnie des habitants de Cologne qui ont pu prendre des bains, préparer des dîners ou faire des soirées d'anniversaire dans la réplique de son appartement new-yorkais au Kunstverein de Cologne en 1996. Au moment de la rétrospective de Tiravanija à la Serpentine, ce temps-là était déjà révolu, on avait l'impression de vivre dans une reconstitution, une mise en scène factice, un pur simulacre de ces relations sociales passées. Mais je reste hantée par le désir de me rappeler et de revisiter mentalement tout ce que j'ai pu oublier de la rétrospective du Couvent des Cordeliers, une exposition qu'on apprécie davantage par le souvenir, précisément à cause son ironie très XXIème siècle.

IMAGE CREDITS

Rirkrit Tiravanija, A Retrospective (Tomorrow is Another Fine Day), 2005, Couvent des Cordeliers, Paris Copyright Marc Domage

Rirkrit Tiravanija, A Retrospective (Tomorrow is Another Fine Day), 2005, Couvent des Cordeliers, Paris Copyright Marc Domage

Rirkrit Tiravanija, A Retrospective (Tomorrow is Another Fine Day), 2005, Couvent des Cordeliers, Paris Copyright Marc Domage

Rirkrit Tiravanija, A Retrospective (Tomorrow is Another Fine Day), 2005, Couvent des Cordeliers, Paris Copyright Marc Domage

Rirkrit Tiravanija, A Retrospective (Tomorrow is Another Fine Day), 2005, Couvent des Cordeliers, Paris Copyright Marc Domage

Rirkrit Tiravanija, (please do not turn off the radio if you want to live well in the next fifteen minutes), 2005 Installation view, A Retrospective (Tomorrow is Another Fine Day), Serpentine Gallery, London ©2005 Rirkrit Tiravanija Photo: Hugo Glendinning

Rirkrit Tiravanija, Untitled (apartment 21) Installation view, A Retrospective (Tomorrow is Another Fine Day), 2005, Serpentine Gallery, London ©2005 Rirkrit Tiravanija Photo: Hugo Glendinning

Rirkrit Tiravanija, Untitled (apartment 21) Installation view, A Retrospective (Tomorrow is Another Fine Day), 2005, Serpentine Gallery, London ©2005 Rirkrit Tiravanija Photo: Hugo Glendinning

Rirkrit Tiravanija, Installation view, A Retrospective (Tomorrow is Another Fine Day), 2005, Serpentine Gallery, London ©2005 Rirkrit Tiravanija Photo: Hugo Glendinning

 
advertisement advertisement advertisement