artwork image
artwork image
artwork image
artwork image
artwork image

English

Tatiana Trouvé at the South London Gallery

Florence Ostende

In her studio in the Parisian suburb of Pantin, Tatiana Trouvé discusses with Florence Ostende her exhibition at the South London Gallery, in which drawings on paper are transformed into three-dimensional sculptures. From time to time, the studio is filled with the muffled vibrations of a passing elevated train.

What was the starting point for your solo show at the South London Gallery?

I wanted to do an exhibition echoing a book of drawings I’m working on at the moment, which will be published by the Migros Museum in Zurich in collaboration with the South London Gallery. It’s an important publication, since it gathers all my drawings since the beginning, from 1990 to now. But I wasn’t interested in actually selecting drawings from the book, which would have meant choosing, spotting affinities and filiations – that’s a curator’s job, not mine. I wouldn’t be able to do it. And I didn’t want to do a drawing show, I’m much more into installations. For me, the only way to show these pieces was to give them another shape in the space, to recreate the works. Unlike my sculptures, which can’t exist in a catalogue, drawings can both be part of book and hung in the space. The show is a topology of drawings; it’s a three-dimensional presentation of my book.

How did you conceptualise the book’s structure?

I didn’t want to follow a chronological order, but to create chapters that would be read as stories of transitions. The book starts with drawings that have been unavailable for a long time because they only existed inside the Modules d'archives of my B.A.I [Bureau des Activités Implicites]. They correspond to the coming together of my world – and of the B.A.I, which I worked on for ten years. The next drawings are halfway between the B.A.I and the studio. The following chapter crystallises the universe of the studio, and its pieces archive my working spaces. Then there are drawings of borders, indeterminate spaces beyond the studio. Immediately after, there’s the beds series. I’m really interested in this idea of the bed, which can be both a place to sleep and a place to work like a real office – it’s a space between consciousness and unconsciousness where you can move back and forth from one dimension to the other. Then, there’s the Remanence series, black on black drawings. When you are working with black, its depth sucks you in, like into a tunnel. This body of works is almost three-dimensional. The opposite comes straight after with the Intranquillity series. These are white on white drawings, it’s like going out of a tunnel, when the daylight seems so violent and the world around you bathes in dazzling overexposure. The following chapter is constituted of drawings of pieces of furniture and cupboards, their open doors touching each other to make a kind of accordion that closes the drawing space. In these unfoldings, an opening dictates a closure, the closure of the sheet of paper. The last chapter is the Envelopments series: my most recent drawings. I make them directly on the wall and they spread in space. Copper strips cross them and continue on the floor. It’s as if one could enter the space of the drawings. I recently showed these pieces at the Migros Museum and at Gagosian Gallery in New York. This principle of spreading in space is a good idea even if it somewhat lacks the slow pace and intimacy only possible with paper. But a drawing in space can’t remake what already exists on paper, you have to find another way for it to exist.

"I like the idea of a line in space becoming shapeless like a wound string; a drawing is something so determinate."

Did you find this ‘other way’ for the South London Gallery show?

Yes. I’m presenting sculptural measurements of my drawings, made to allow them to exist in volume. I calculate the surface used by pencil lines, collages, paper and colour planes and convert the results into lengths on a rope. Each element of the drawing amounts to a percentage of rope on the spool. It goes up to 200 meters for the big drawings and 100 meters for the small ones. The ropes are basically archives of my drawings but in another format, one existing in three dimensions. I’m trying to find another possible shape for these drawings: they can be turned into spools, rods or stems. I like the idea of a line in space becoming shapeless like a wound string; a drawing is something so determinate.

These sculptural measurements have already appeared in your work …

That’s true, but in the former pieces these measurements were compact, impossible to unfold. The idea in London is to create an accessible archive. At SLG, the measurements can spread and reveal different colours for example. My first measurements always came after the installations. At the end of the shows, I destroy everything, even the models and plans eventually disappear. So I turned these disappeared installations into sculptural measurements, impossible to ‘open’. I quantify everything I build in my exhibition, including the walls and all my architectural transformations of the space. These measurements take the shape of spools coming in different sizes. I then mould them in concrete or in bronze to prevent them from being opened – they turn into fossils. I like the idea of keeping a trace of the disappearances. At the SLG, I use this idea again, but this time with the dimensions of the drawings instead of those from my previous exhibitions.

"Each new show is as if I was moving somewhere. But it’s not good enough to just grab a couple of suitcases and go, each place is so different."

How are you transforming the space?

I have lowered the ceiling and added walls to create three different spaces. In the first space, I’m showing two new drawings together with sculptural measurements based on drawings from the book. In the second space, I’ve displayed sketches turned into installations, like a landscape coming out of the paper and invading the third dimension. There, I’ve worked directly on the wall with pastel, paint, and varnish drippings – it’s a very quick and immediate process, hence the word ‘sketch’. There are no prefabricated elements, except for an exploded tyre I found at the scene of an accident and that I had to mould in bronze to freeze the traces of the explosion, otherwise it would have rotted. It’s weird, for me this tyre is more a drawing than a sculpture. In the last space, there are burnt marks on the walls echoing the sketches just behind in the second space. This visual echo reveals another topology of the space; it underscores the distance from one wall to another, the space’s dimensions and its depth. It really changes the perception of the place. In this show, the visitor goes through different incarnations of drawing: the drawing itself, sculptural measurements of the drawing and the sketches settling its presence in the place.

You almost never use already existing pieces in your solo shows: you always start from scratch and seek new possible shapes for your works. It must be exhausting …

Each new show is as if I was moving somewhere. But it’s not good enough to just grab a couple of suitcases and go, each place is so different. So for all my exhibitions, I start with models and constructions. The space’s architecture is a crucial element of my practice, and this goes beyond the place where I actually hang the works. The pieces change with the architecture and vice versa. You are right, it’s exhausting. I’ve never used existing works, I create everything each time. I’m taking risks – sometimes I make mistakes, but that’s part of the work!

"I could do plans on a computer, using alluring virtual architecture, but I can’t imagine anything on screen. It’s too disembodied."

Has an exhibition ever failed?

Of course, but with time you gain experience. Sometimes, you make silly errors. I remember once the exhibition plan was very coherent and when I arrived in the space, I realised that I had too many works, I couldn’t put anything together. The objects remained ‘objects’, nothing else. When you are on location, it’s hard to question what you’ve done, to start all over again and put yourself in danger. I sometimes made mistakes by planning too much. It worked on paper, but not in the actual space.

What steps do you take when preparing for a show?

First, I go and see the space. I then go back to the studio and begin working on the model. In my practice, everything starts with the model; it’s essential. Then I start thinking about the sculptures and I lay out my work in the space. I could do plans on a computer, using alluring virtual architecture, but I can’t imagine anything on screen. It’s too disembodied. It’s only at the end of this process that someone comes and helps me finish the model in order to send it to the museum.

"The idea came when I stopped thinking about it. You shouldn’t be afraid of slowing down, even if you feel that everything is collapsing."

Have you ever tried to work in situ without any models?

Never. This working method came naturally to me. Having said that, I don’t believe in working methods. For me, it’s not about a working method but about the creation of a universe.

When you first moved to Paris, the time spent looking for a job became work in itself. Things have moved on. Today, with all the commissions you get, how do you protect your thinking time?

I save time now because I’m not trying to anymore. Over the last few years, I did a lot of projects and exhibitions, and I had the feeling that everything was too quick, that I needed more time. I recently understood that I was wrong: I needed these moments of acceleration. I could use already existing pieces and save a lot of time, but it’s by creating a new universe for each show, by allowing time and energy for ideas that, in some way, I really save time. When I started thinking about the South London Gallery exhibition, I couldn’t find a way to move on from the book to the show. I was stuck. I went away to the mountains and I had the idea for the show as I was walking. The idea came when I stopped thinking about it. You shouldn’t be afraid of slowing down, even if you feel that everything is collapsing. Sleeping doesn’t mean that nothing is going on; it’s a space of freedom you should regain. I can’t organise thinking time, it’s an unconscious process, but I stopped being afraid of wasting time and I stopped conceptualising it. And it’s when I let go that I gain working time. Time that truly belongs to us isn’t really quantifiable; I have accepted that things escape me. What I’m interested in is finding the right conditions for things to happen. There is the time of the diary and deadlines, and there is another time, when ideas can take shape. You have to deal with both.

"All my drawings are collages from the places I live in or I show my work in: it’s as if I was taking photographs of exhibition spaces and reworking them."

Between the model, the studio and the gallery space, your work goes through different steps. How do you move from one space to the other?

It’s very intuitive. I work with fragments, there’s a perpetual back-and-forth between the different fragments, coming from the studio, the model and the actual space. When I set up an exhibition, I arrive with a series of elements that only function together at the very end, as I’m tweaking the installation on site. I can stop when I’ve found how to link them. It’s exactly the same thing with the drawings. In fact all my drawings are collages from the places I live in or I show my work in: it’s as if I was taking photographs of exhibition spaces and reworking them.

I’m very interested in the memory of exhibitions. What have you seen that has really stayed with you?

I rarely remember the architecture of the shows I visit. The last exhibition that really counted for me was Francis Alÿs at Tate Modern. The space wasn’t taken into consideration at all, but I’ve kept a really strong memory of that show. He’s such a wonderful artist, a real box of ideas. His pieces aren’t spectacular, but he uses a very focused vocabulary and strong concepts that draw us into his world. You forget the exhibition!

IMAGE CREDITS

Tatiana Trouvé, studio - September 2010
Photograph by Lola Reboud
Copyright Lola Reboud

Tatiana Trouvé, studio - September 2010
Photograph by Lola Reboud
Copyright Lola Reboud

Tatiana Trouvé, studio - September 2010
Photograph by Lola Reboud
Copyright Lola Reboud

Tatiana Trouvé, studio - September 2010
Photograph by Lola Reboud
Copyright Lola Reboud

Tatiana Trouvé, studio - September 2010
Photograph by Lola Reboud
Copyright Lola Reboud

This series of images has been specially commissioned by Catalogue.

Français

Tatiana Trouvé à la South London Gallery

Florence Ostende

Dans son atelier à Pantin, en banlieue de Paris, Tatiana Trouvé révèle la maquette de son exposition personnelle à la South London Gallery de Londres et raconte le processus de réalisation de ses sculptures à partir de relevés de dessins. De temps en temps, un train passe au-dessus de nos têtes, une sorte de tremblement sourd envahit l'atelier.

Quel a été le point de départ de votre exposition personnelle à la South London Gallery ?

J'avais envie de faire une exposition en écho à un livre de dessins sur lequel je travaille, que va publier le Migros Museum de Zürich en partenariat avec la South London Gallery. C'est un ouvrage important, il regroupe mes dessins depuis le début, de 1990 à aujourd'hui. Pour cette exposition, sélectionner des dessins à partir du livre ne m'intéressait pas beaucoup. Il aurait fallu choisir, repérer des échos et des filiations, c'est le travail d'un commissaire, pas le mien. J’en serais incapable. La seule façon pour moi de les exposer, c'était de leur trouver une autre forme dans l'espace, de recréer des œuvres. Et puis je ne voulais pas d'une exposition uniquement de dessins, ce que j'aime ce sont les installations. Les dessins s'adaptent aussi bien au format du livre qu'à un accrochage dans l'espace, ce n'est pas le cas de mes sculptures qui ne peuvent trouver leur forme dans un catalogue. Cette exposition est une topologie de dessins. C'est une présentation de mon livre mais en trois dimensions.

Comment avez-vous pensé la structure de ce livre ?

Je ne voulais pas suivre d'ordre chronologique mais créer des chapitres, comme des histoires de passages. Le livre commence par des dessins qui sont restés longtemps inaccessibles car ils n'existaient qu'à l'intérieur des Modules d'archives de mon B.A.I [Bureau des Activités Implicites]. Ils correspondent à la constitution de mon monde et du B.A.I sur lequel j'ai travaillé pendant 10 ans. Ensuite, il y a des dessins qui se situent entre l'univers du B.A.I et l'atelier. Le chapitre suivant correspond à la mise en place de cet univers. Ce sont des archives de mes espaces de travail. Puis, il y a des dessins de frontières : ils représentent des espaces indéfinis en dehors de l'atelier. Juste après, on trouve la série des lits. Le lit m'intéresse beaucoup car il peut être à la fois un espace de sommeil et un espace de travail, comme un vrai bureau, un espace entre le conscient et l'inconscient où l'on peut basculer d'une dimension à l'autre. Ensuite, on passe à la série Remanence, des dessins noir sur noir. Quand on dessine avec du noir, on est aspiré par la profondeur, comme dans un tunnel, c'est presque un travail en trois dimensions. Vient alors l'inverse, la série Intranquillity, des dessins blanc sur blanc, comme lorsqu'on sort d'un tunnel et que le jour vous semble extrêmement violent, une sorte de surexposition qui vous brûle les yeux. Le chapitre suivant est composé de dessins de meubles et de placards dont les portes ouvertes se touchent et forment des accordéons, refermant ainsi l'espace du dessin. Ce sont des déploiements d'espace dans lesquels une ouverture engage une fermeture, celle de la feuille de papier. Enfin, le dernier chapitre, la série Envelopments : ce sont mes dessins les plus récents. Je les réalise directement sur le mur et ils s'étirent dans l'espace. Des bandes de cuivre les traversent et continuent sur le sol comme si on pouvait rentrer dans l'espace du dessin. Je les ai montrés récemment au Migros Museum et à la galerie Gagosian à New York. Le principe d'étirement est une bonne idée mais il manque ce processus lent et intime qui n'existe que sur le papier. Un dessin dans l'espace ne peut être une reconstitution de ce qui existe déjà sur papier, il faut trouver une autre forme.

"J'aime bien l'idée qu'un trait dans l'espace devienne informe, comme une ficelle enroulée, alors qu'un dessin est quelque chose de très défini."

Est-ce que vous avez trouvé cette "autre forme" pour l'exposition de la South London Gallery ?

Oui, je vais présenter des relevés de mes dessins pour qu'ils existent en volume. Je calcule la surface de crayon, de collage, de papier, d'aplat de couleur et je les convertis en fonction de la longueur d'une corde. On arrive à 200 mètres pour les grands formats et 100 mètres pour les petits. Chaque élément du dessin équivaut à un pourcentage de corde sur la bobine. Ces relevés sont des archives de mes dessins mais sous une autre forme, celle de la troisième dimension. Je présente une forme possible de ces dessins, cela peut devenir des bobines, des barres, des tiges. J'aime bien l'idée qu'un trait dans l'espace devienne informe, comme une ficelle enroulée, alors qu'un dessin est quelque chose de très défini.

Le relevé est un procédé déjà présent dans votre travail...

Oui, mais avant mes relevés étaient compacts, indépliables. À Londres, l'idée est de créer une archive accessible et que ces relevés puissent se "déplier", révéler différentes couleurs par exemple. Mes premiers relevés étaient destinés aux installations. À la fin d'une exposition, je détruis tout. Même les maquettes et les plans finissent par disparaître. Du coup, ces installations qui disparaissent redeviennent des sculptures sous forme de relevés qu'on ne peut plus ouvrir, déplier. J'aime l'idée de garder une trace de ces disparitions. Je mesure tout ce que je construis dans mes expositions y compris les cimaises et toutes mes transformations architecturales de l'espace d'exposition. Ces relevés prennent la forme de bobines de tailles différentes, en fonction de la construction, je les moule ensuite en ciment ou en bronze pour qu'on ne puisse plus les déplier, comme un ensemble fossilisé. À la South London Gallery, je réutilise cette idée de relevé mais avec les dessins.

"Chaque nouvelle exposition, c'est comme si je partais m'installer quelque part. Il ne suffit pas de prendre deux valises et de partir."

Comment avez-vous transformé l'espace ?

J'ai abaissé le plafond et j'ai rajouté des cloisons pour créer trois espaces différents. Dans le premier espace, je présente deux nouveaux dessins accompagnés des dessins du livre sous forme de relevés. Dans le deuxième espace, j'expose des croquis sous forme d'installations. C'est comme un paysage qui sort du papier et se déploie en trois dimensions. Je travaille directement sur le mur avec du pastel, de la peinture et des coulures de vernis, d'où le terme croquis car c'est un procédé immédiat et rapide. Il n'y a pas d'éléments déjà fabriqués, sauf un pneu éclaté trouvé sur les lieux d'un accident et que j'ai dû mouler en bronze pour figer les traces de l'explosion, sinon il se décomposait. C'est étrange, je vois plus ce pneu comme un dessin que comme une sculpture. Derrière la cloison, dans le troisième espace, il y a des brûlures sur les cimaises qui reprennent les croquis qui sont juste derrière, mais sous une autre forme, comme un écho. L'écho révèle une autre topologie de l'espace, donne la mesure d'une distance d'un mur à l'autre, la dimension et la profondeur de l'espace. Il change la perception. Dans cette exposition, on traverse plusieurs modes de l'univers d'un dessin : le dessin lui-même, le relevé du dessin sous forme de sculpture et le croquis qui fige sa présence dans le lieu.

Vous n'utilisez quasiment jamais d'œuvres existantes dans vos expositions monographiques. Vous reprenez tout du début et cherchez une nouvelle forme à chaque fois, ça doit être épuisant...

Chaque nouvelle exposition, c'est comme si je partais m'installer quelque part. Il ne suffit pas de prendre deux valises et de partir. Chaque lieu est tellement différent. Pour toutes mes expositions, je fais des maquettes et des constructions. L'architecture de l'espace est un élément essentiel de mon travail, ce n'est pas seulement un espace dans lequel je vais accrocher des choses. Les œuvres se transforment en fonction de l'architecture et vice versa. En effet, c'est épuisant, je n'ai jamais repris d'œuvres existantes, je crée tout à chaque fois, c'est une vraie prise de risque, parfois on commet des erreurs mais ça fait partie du travail !

"Je pourrais faire des plans sur ordinateur avec de belles architectures séduisantes mais je suis incapable d'imaginer quoi que ce soit sur un écran, c'est trop désincarné."

Vous avez déjà raté une exposition ?

Oh oui ! Mais au fil du temps, on gagne de l'expérience. Parfois, on se trompe pour des bêtises. Je me souviens d'une fois où le plan de l'exposition était très cohérent et arrivée dans l'espace, je me suis rendu compte que j'avais fait une sélection trop large de pièces, je n'arrivais pas à constituer quelque chose. Les objets restaient justement "objets", cela n'allait pas plus loin. Sur place, on n'a pas toujours le courage de donner un grand coup de pied dans ce qu'on a fait, de recommencer du début, de rester la nuit entière, tout reprendre et se mettre en danger. J'ai parfois commis des erreurs en voulant trop faire de calculs, ça marchait sur la maquette mais pas dans l'espace réel.

Quelles sont les étapes de la conception d'une exposition ?

Je vais d'abord visiter l'espace puis je reviens à l'atelier pour construire la maquette. Dans mon travail, tout part de la maquette, c'est primordial. Ensuite, je commence à réfléchir aux sculptures et je mets en place mon plan de travail. Je pourrais faire des plans sur ordinateur avec de belles architectures séduisantes mais je suis incapable d'imaginer quoi que ce soit sur un écran, c'est trop désincarné. Ce n'est qu'à la fin que quelqu'un vient m'aider à réaliser la modélisation de la maquette pour l'envoyer au musée.

"J'ai trouvé mon idée au moment où j'ai décidé de lâcher prise. Il ne faut pas avoir peur de ralentir, même si on a l'impression que tout s'effondre."

Avez-vous déjà essayé de travailler complètement in situ sans maquette?

Non jamais, cette méthode de travail s'est imposée naturellement à moi. Même si je pense qu'il n'y a pas à proprement parler une méthode de travail, cela n'existe pas. Pour moi le travail ne repose pas sur l'invention d'une méthode mais sur la constitution d’un univers.

Quand vous êtes arrivée à Paris, le temps de la recherche d'emploi est devenu un temps de travail à part entière. Aujourd'hui les choses ont évolué, comment préserver le temps de la pensée face à toutes ces commandes?

Je pense qu'aujourd'hui j'ai gagné ce temps justement parce que je ne le compte plus. Ces dernières années, j'ai fait beaucoup de projets et d'expositions, j'avais l'impression que tout allait trop vite, que le temps me manquait mais je me suis rendu compte récemment que c'était faux, j'avais besoin de ces accélérations. Je pourrais prendre beaucoup d'œuvres qui existent déjà et gagner beaucoup de temps, mais en voulant recréer à chaque fois un univers, en cherchant le temps et l'énergie pour les idées, d'une certaine manière, je gagne aussi du temps. Pour l'exposition de la South London Gallery, au début, je n'arrivais pas à trouver comment passer du livre à l'exposition, j'étais bloquée. Je suis partie une semaine à la montagne et pendant cette marche, l'idée de l'exposition est venue. J'ai trouvé mon idée au moment où j'ai décidé de lâcher prise. Il ne faut pas avoir peur de ralentir, même si on a l'impression que tout s'effondre. Ce n'est pas parce qu'on dort qu'il ne se passe rien, c'est une zone de liberté qu'il faut reprendre. Le temps des idées ne dépend pas de moi, il est inconscient. J'ai arrêté de compter le temps et de le conceptualiser, je me laisse plus aller et je gagne du temps de travail. Le temps qui nous appartient vraiment n'est pas quantifiable. J'ai accepté qu'il fallait que des choses m'échappent. Ce qui m'intéresse, c'est de trouver des conditions pour que les choses puissent se produire. Il y a le temps du calendrier et des deadlines et il y a un autre moment où les idées ont besoin de trouver leur temps de sédimentation. On doit faire avec ces deux temps.

"Tous mes dessins sont des collages à partir de lieux où je vis et j'expose : je prends des photographies d'espaces d'expositions et je les retravaille."

Entre la maquette, l'atelier et l'espace d'exposition, votre travail passe par plusieurs étapes. Comment passez-vous d'un espace à l'autre ?

C'est très intuitif. C'est un travail de fragment, il y a un va-et-vient constant entre différents fragments de l'atelier, de la maquette et de l'espace réel. Quand je fais une exposition, j'amène une série d'éléments qui ne fonctionnent qu'à la fin, au moment des réglages sur place. Quand j'ai trouvé comment relier l'ensemble, je peux m'arrêter. Pour les dessins c'est la même chose. D'ailleurs, tous mes dessins sont des collages à partir de lieux où je vis et j'expose : je prends des photographies d'espaces d'expositions et je les retravaille.

Je m'intéresse beaucoup à la mémoire de l'exposition, qu'avez-vous vu de marquant ?

Je me souviens rarement des architectures d'exposition que je visite. La dernière exposition qui m'a marquée est celle de Francis Alÿs à la Tate Modern. L'espace n'y est pas du tout pris en compte mais j'en ai un souvenir très fort. Cet artiste est formidable, c'est une boîte à idées. Les œuvres ne sont pas du tout spectaculaires, il utilise un vocabulaire tenu avec des idées fortes qui nous font basculer dans son univers, on en oublie l'exposition !

IMAGE CREDITS

Tatiana Trouvé, studio - September 2010
Photograph by Lola Reboud
Copyright Lola Reboud

Tatiana Trouvé, studio - September 2010
Photograph by Lola Reboud
Copyright Lola Reboud

Tatiana Trouvé, studio - September 2010
Photograph by Lola Reboud
Copyright Lola Reboud

Tatiana Trouvé, studio - September 2010
Photograph by Lola Reboud
Copyright Lola Reboud

Tatiana Trouvé, studio - September 2010
Photograph by Lola Reboud
Copyright Lola Reboud

This series of images has been specially commissioned by Catalogue.

 
advertisement advertisement advertisement