artwork image
artwork image
artwork image
artwork image
artwork image
artwork image
artwork image
artwork image
artwork image

English

Supporting Roles

Laura McLean-Ferris

What kind of critical response can we have when faced with a roll of tape or a strip of metal mesh?

In a British gallery over the past few years you might have happened upon works made from the following: coverless duvets, shelf brackets, support struts, polystyrene blocks, polythene packaging, greyboard mounting, grout, makeup, or moisturiser. Bric-a-brac from the house and the studio. These are things that assist in the display and support of art: cladding, backing, sticking, holding. But also materials that support the body: buildings, beds and bathrooms. A distinct group of artists can be identified which employs these materials and which also makes work that appears slight or light – work that is small, thin or difficult to see, looking as though it might float away, or has fallen over. The materials are somewhat impoverished in physicality and association. In its muteness this work appears almost to turn away from the viewer.

Tape, sand and chalk

Sean Edwards, for example, has created several pieces of work from rolls of tape, one roll hung on a nail on the wall and another with a multicoloured support that sits on the gallery floor. Both tape rolls are out of the viewer’s reach – lowly at ankle height, or above one’s head. Vanessa Billy’s Dry Stamina (2008) turned the step in London’s Limoncello Gallery into a slope of sand, which was quickly worn away into a grainy mess by visitors. Within this group one might also think of Karla Black’s sculptures, in which gallery floors are covered by a mix of petal-pale chalk dust and toiletry products, Matthew Smith’s duvets hunched on the floor, and George Henry Longly’s foam structures and thin cement paintings.

Each of these artists has their own formal, aesthetic and philosophical concerns. One might consider their use of found objects from the behind-the-scenes of art and life as a modern Arte Povera. They also draw, in an inverted sense, on the theatricality of minimalism as described by Michael Fried – demanding attention with their isolated, forlorn presentation and appealing to the relative scale of the viewer’s body. However, many of these works call on the viewer or writer to respond in ways about which we might feel suspicious. We are often on tricky and uncertain ground here, and sometimes we are not sure that the work can sustain our weight, critically or physically, for it is too slight.

Mundane lyricism

There is a poeticism in this stuff of the everyday that might raise a spectre of the scene in Sam Mendes’ film American Beauty (1999), in which teenager Ricky Fitts shows his girlfriend a film he has made of the most beautiful thing he has ever seen – an empty plastic bag being tossed by the wind down the street. It is beautiful, but it is also full of air, of nothing. Edwards has, indeed, created several prints of floating shopping bags. Having been bandied about to the point of meaninglessness, the term ‘poetic’ is treated in art criticism with much suspicion, but it is certain that many of these artists trade on just that quality. The viewer is often presented with work that is so negligible in terms of what it gives – the roll of tape in Edwards’ case, or a towel pinned to the wall in the case of Matthew Smith – that one is often in the position of attempting to create and force connective tissue and glue when looking at work to interpret it. How can a long lyrical title refer to this quiet object? How can the separate objects displayed as art connect to one another?

There is much to consider about this kind of work, about an analysis of its appearance at this point, about its genealogy. Why should a kind of modest mournfulness, a melancholic formalism, be so prevalent an atmosphere for a gallery space? Why should reductionism continue as a concern, and does the increasing relevance of this concern have a relationship with the reductionism in culture related to crises of climate and economics? Has the overwhelming conviction that we should be spending less, eating less, wasting less energy, and paying more attention to our offcuts and surplus created a fetish of less, loss and lack?

Support / structure

One formal aspect worth focussing on is that several of the aforementioned artists are concerned by investigations of weight and horizontality. Indeed, works that might look as though they cannot bear much weight are, in fact, highly engaged with questions of support. There are also several references made by artists to support structures, metaphorical and actual, to the floor and the prone body. This theme can be traced to Eva Hesse’s fragile sculptures and Carl Andre’s floor works. And it might be drawn into relation with the more recent found object work of Latin American artists, such as Rivane Neuenschwander and Alexandre da Cunha, the latter of whom invited visitors to use his homespun crutches They Really Work for Me (2000) at the 2003 Venice Biennale.

Billy’s sand floor is destroyed by human weight, Smith’s duvets recall the human body slumping towards sleep. George Henry Longly’s 2008 exhibition at Dicksmith Gallery seemed to explore props and supports as physical manifestations of psychological or personal crutches, and included Rigidities and themes (2008), a shelf of chipfoam brick supports that appeared to be trying to raise themselves from a vertical position before falling. Alongside this was a work created from pasted newspaper entitled When he stumbled and fell people held their breath. Of course they had seen it coming but when it finally did happen and they heard the sound of his body smack against that truss they were visibly in shock for a second – before they burst out laughing … (2008), eliciting from the viewer a mental image of a body falling on a nearby truss sculpture, also part of the exhibition. Karla Black’s enquiries into support extend not only to floor-based sculpture but also the elements of ablution and concealment in cosmetics, which can be understood as visual crutches. The artist appears to liken them to punctuation – a supporting foundation that allows writers to be understood and structure language. The floor is also a concern in one of Sean Edwards’ sculptures exhibited at Limoncello last year, An Elevation of The Floor For Egotistical Reasons (2008), which was created by raising a section of the floor. The sculpture atop it, however, was one that appeared to have been unable to rise to the challenge, appearing as if it had fallen on its side.

Tiptoeing out from behind the curtains

The slumped stature of this work – turned away, discarded, collapsed in a heap or fallen to the floor – has a certain melancholic nature. These are materials that are used and slung aside: the duvet is thrown off in the morning, deodorant smeared on. The body of the artwork sleeps in packages of tape and foam, which are then torn off and flung into the wings. However, these supporting roles have, at certain times over the past few years, appeared tentatively to take centre stage, tiptoeing out from behind the curtains. That being said, melancholy, while always a fertile subject for art, cannot by its very nature always push itself forward. The currents that wash these concerns onto the shores of artistic consciousness are diffuse and complex, particularly as these practices are so self-contained, and do not ostensibly refer to contemporary political issues. However, such work’s ability to become important in this particular period speaks volumes about what we as a culture are demanding from art. As the supporting structures for viewing and making art become less and less certain, perhaps there is a demand for less certainty, and for attention to be paid to those voices that are sometimes drowned out by shouting.

IMAGE CREDITS

Vanessa Billy, Wait, Sit, Converse, 2009. Natural stone, water, plastic and concrete. Courtesy: Vanessa Billy and Lisson Gallery.

Vanessa Billy, Dry Stamina, 2008. Sand. Courtesy: Limoncello, London.

Sean Edward, Untitled, 2008. 80 x 35mm slides. Courtesy: Sean Edward, Tanya Leighton Gallery, Berlin, and Limoncello, London.

Sean Edward, Untitled, 2008. Quilters tape, nail, inkjet print. H9cm x W9cm x D8cm. Courtesy: Sean Edward, Tanya Leighton Gallery, Berlin, and Limoncello, London.

Sean Edward, Untitled, 2008. Cardboard, masking tape. H13cm x W7cm x D7cm. Courtesy: Sean Edward, Tanya Leighton Gallery, Berlin, and Limoncello, London.

Matthew Smith, Some afternoons, 2008. Futon mattress, wooden spoon, concrete. 29 x 134 x 37 cm. Courtesy: Matthew Smith and Mary Mary, Glasgow. Photo: Ruth Clark.

Karla Black, Principals Of Admitting, 2009. Plaster powder, powder paint, sugar paper, spray tan, chalk, concealer stick. 20 x 2770 x 1025cm. Courtesy: Karla Black, Mary Mary, Glasgow, Galerie Gisela Capitain, Cologne, and Migros Museum, Zurich. Photo: A Burger, Zurich.

Installation view of George Henry Longly, It must be a garbled version of another explanation, Dicksmith, London, 2008. Courtesy: George Henry Longly and Dicksmith Gallery, London.

George Henry Longly, Reticent and Politic, 2008. 2 x freestanding mesh screens, spray paint. Courtesy: George Henry Longly and Dicksmith Gallery, London.

Français

Soutenance de thèse

Laura McLean-Ferris

Comment interpréter un rouleau de scotch ou un fil de fer dans une exposition? Un tel raisonnement peut-il tenir debout?

En Angleterre, peu de visiteurs d'exposition ont échappé à la récente invasion de tasseaux, étais, cartons d'encadrement, enduit, blocs de polystyrène, emballages en polyéthylène, couettes, maquillage et crème hydratante. Le bric-à-brac de la maison et de l'atelier fait sensation dans les galeries d'art. Les artistes engagés dans ce répertoire ont surtout favorisé des matériaux qui assurent l'accrochage, le soutien, la stabilité et la sécurité des œuvres d'art (revêtement, cloison, fixation) et des hommes (bricolage, literie, salles de bain). Fragiles et légères, ces œuvres sont quasiment imperceptibles. On a la sensation qu'elles vont s'évaporer dans les airs ou disparaître sous terre. L'appauvrissement des matériaux prend alors le risque d'appauvrir l'interprétation du spectateur qui, démuni face au mutisme de l'œuvre, a l'impression qu'on lui tourne le dos.

Hors de portée

Premier signe de mise à distance : les rouleaux de scotch de Sean Edwards. Plantés d'un clou au mur ou posés au sol sur une armature multicolore, au dessus de nos têtes ou à nos pieds, ils sont hors de portée du visiteur. À Limoncello, jeune galerie londonienne, Vanessa Billy a recouvert de sable l'inclinaison d'une marche. Le passage des visiteurs aura vite fait de disperser le tas en milliers de grains. Parmi tant d'autres signes de dispersion, Karla Black répand sur le sol un mélange de poudre de craie pastel et de produits de beauté, maquillage et vaseline, Matthew Smith enroule des couettes par terre et George Henry Longly réalise des structures en mousse et tableaux en ciment.

Bien que chaque artiste ait son propre vocabulaire plastique et philosophique, les objets trouvés qu'ils utilisent célèbrent l'union (désormais historique) de l'art avec la vie à travers une réincarnation contemporaine de l'Arte Povera. Leurs œuvres évoquent également, dans un tout autre registre, la théâtralité du minimalisme telle que l'a décrite Michael Fried. La mise à distance des œuvres tristement isolées dans l'espace ne fait que renforcer l'attention du spectateur, ainsi que la compassion de son corps face à leur échelle humaine. Malgré le renfort de références, le visiteur ne parvient pas toujours à construire son raisonnement. Le terrain est si glissant qu'en cas de chute, il n'est pas certain que l'œuvre, fragile et chétive, puisse rattraper le corps, encore moins l'esprit.

Du vent, du vide

La simplicité poétique de ces œuvres ressuscite la scène du film American Beauty (1999) de Sam Mendes dans laquelle l'adolescent Ricky Fitts montre à sa petite amie la plus belle chose qu'il ait jamais filmée : un sac plastique dans la rue poussé par le vent. L'image est sublime et pourtant, ce n'est que du vent, du vide. Edwards a d'ailleurs réalisé des tirages avec des sacs plastique qui flottent dans le vide. Le qualificatif « poétique » fera certainement frémir quelques critiques méfiants ; l'emploi abusif de la formule l'ayant peu à peu vidé de son sens. Et pourtant, les artistes tirent largement profit du poétique. Face à un bout de scotch d'Edwards ou une serviette clouée au mur de Smith, le spectateur tente désespérément de démêler les fils, quitte à s'y prendre à coups de râteau et forcer le sens.

Il y aurait beaucoup à en dire sur chaque œuvre, son apparence, ses origines, son développement. Pourquoi les galeries d'art tiennent-elles tant à exposer des formes aussi sobres? Pourquoi promouvoir une atmosphère si mélancolique? Y aurait-il un lien avec notre culture qui confrontée à la crise économique et écologique veut acheter moins, manger moins et dépenser moins d'énergie? La privation, la perte et le manque sont-ils devenus le slogan d'un nouveau culte?

Des béquilles

La récurrence des thèmes du poids et de l'horizontalité révèle dans ce corpus d'œuvres une certaine contradiction. Bien qu'elles soient incapables de soutenir le moindre poids, elles assurent toujours le maintien, réel ou métaphorique, de quelque chose. Les leitmotiv du corps et du sol renvoient respectivement aux sculptures d'Eva Hesse et Carl Andre, mais aussi aux œuvres plus récentes de certains artistes d'Amérique latine comme Rivane Neuenschwander et Alexandre da Cunha. En 2003, da Cunha invite les visiteurs de la Biennale de Venise à utiliser ses béquilles faites maison (They Really Work for Me, 2000).

À la merci du moindre coup de pied, le tas de sable au sol de Billy fait profil bas, au même titre que la couette de Smith, avachie par terre, telle un corps humain tombant de fatigue. Lors de son exposition à la Dicksmith Gallery en 2008, George Henry Longly présente accessoires et supports qu'on serait tenté d'utiliser comme des béquilles psychologiques. Des cales rectangulaires en mousse d'agglo tiennent à la verticale sur une étagère, leur équilibre précaire menace à tout moment de s'effondrer (Rigidities and themes, 2008). Réalisée à partir de collages de journaux, l'œuvre intitulée When he stumbled and fell people held their breath. Of course they had seen it coming but when it finally did happen and they heard the sound of his body smack against that truss they were visibly in shock for a second – before they burst out laughing… (2008)1 déclenche l'image mentale d'un corps qui trébuche sur une armature de poutre représentée par une sculpture juste à côté dans l'espace d'exposition. À l'occasion de ses recherches sur le support, Karla Black embellit ses sculptures au sol de produits cosmétiques qui nettoient et camouflent le corps, des béquilles esthétiques pour mieux supporter les agressions extérieures. Elle compare volontiers ces matériaux à la ponctuation que l'écrivain utilise pour soutenir la structure de sa phrase. Le sol est tout aussi fréquent dans le travail de Sean Edwards qui l'année dernière a surélevé un bout du parquet de la galerie Limoncello (An Elevation of The Floor For Egotistical Reasons, 2008). Juste au-dessus, une autre œuvre, certainement tombée sur le côté, n'a pas pu tenir la distance.

Sortir de la réserve

Comme un tas de poussière abandonné dans le coin d'une pièce, ces œuvres, abattues et rejetées, dégagent une certaine mélancolie. Elles ont été réalisées à partir de matériaux qu'on balance à la poubelle comme on balance sa couette au réveil pour se mettre ensuite, d'un geste machinal et négligé, du déodorant sur le corps. Leur âme sommeille dans les cartons poussiéreux de la réserve des galeries. Dans la précipitation du montage d'exposition, on vient les ouvrir à la hâte pour récupérer un rouleau de scotch ou une cale en mousse qui finiront en tas de poussière abandonné dans le coin d'une pièce. Mais ces dernières années, le matériel d'emballage a quitté la réserve sur la pointe des pieds pour s'exposer à la lumière des projecteurs. Leur mélancolie latente ne peut par définition s'imposer sur le devant de la scène : le thème si fertile en histoire de l'art a toujours privilégié des formes de retrait. Discrètes et secrètes, elles ne réclament rien, pas même une petite revendication politique à la mode pour pouvoir tenir un peu plus longtemps la tête hors de l'eau, avant de se faire engloutir par la vague. Leur entrée en scène remarquablement réussie en cette période si particulière en dit long sur ce que notre culture attend de l'art. Tandis que les structures de soutien à la visibilité et à la production de l'art s'affaiblissent de jour en jour, leurs voix, pareillement affaiblies et sans cesse menacées par les hurlements de la vague, ont désormais toute notre attention.

1] Juste avant sa chute, il a senti les gens autour retenir leur souffle. Tout le monde savait ce qui allait arriver et quand soudain, ils ont entendu le choc brutal de son corps contre une poutre, ils sont restés sans voix un instant puis ont éclaté de rire.

IMAGE CREDITS

Vanessa Billy, Wait, Sit, Converse, 2009. Natural stone, water, plastic and concrete. Courtesy: Vanessa Billy and Lisson Gallery.

Vanessa Billy, Dry Stamina, 2008. Sand. Courtesy: Limoncello, London.

Sean Edward, Untitled, 2008. 80 x 35mm slides. Courtesy: Sean Edward, Tanya Leighton Gallery, Berlin, and Limoncello, London.

Sean Edward, Untitled, 2008. Quilters tape, nail, inkjet print. H9cm x W9cm x D8cm. Courtesy: Sean Edward, Tanya Leighton Gallery, Berlin, and Limoncello, London.

Sean Edward, Untitled, 2008. Cardboard, masking tape. H13cm x W7cm x D7cm. Courtesy: Sean Edward, Tanya Leighton Gallery, Berlin, and Limoncello, London.

Matthew Smith, Some afternoons, 2008. Futon mattress, wooden spoon, concrete. 29 x 134 x 37 cm. Courtesy: Matthew Smith and Mary Mary, Glasgow. Photo: Ruth Clark.

Karla Black, Principals Of Admitting, 2009. Plaster powder, powder paint, sugar paper, spray tan, chalk, concealer stick. 20 x 2770 x 1025cm. Courtesy: Karla Black, Mary Mary, Glasgow, Galerie Gisela Capitain, Cologne, and Migros Museum, Zurich. Photo: A Burger, Zurich.

Installation view of George Henry Longly, It must be a garbled version of another explanation, Dicksmith, London, 2008. Courtesy: George Henry Longly and Dicksmith Gallery, London.

George Henry Longly, Reticent and Politic, 2008. 2 x freestanding mesh screens, spray paint. Courtesy: George Henry Longly and Dicksmith Gallery, London.

 
advertisement advertisement advertisement