artwork image
artwork image
artwork image
artwork image
artwork image
artwork image

English

Simon Starling

In Translation

Melissa Gronlund

Like translation, Simon Starling’s practice involves a cycle of transformations, from one state to the next, one incarnation to the other. Melissa Gronlund analyses some of his best-most known and recent works through the prism of transliteration.

What’s at stake in translation? This is the question asked – or perhaps elided – by Catalogue, with its bilingual format and incorporation of linguistic difference into the structure of the magazine. Translation is also one way to approach Simon Starling’s practice and its various investigations into the transformation of matter in and out of different states. But which of the three states – the origin, the change, or the result – matters most in considering his work?

Henry Moore in Ontario

For what is arguably his most famous piece, Shedboatshed (2005), Starling disassembled a shed to make a boat, sailed down the Rhine, and, arriving at his destination, made the boat into a shed again. (It was this structure he exhibited.) More recent works have involved sailing down New York’s Hoosic and Hudson rivers in a traditional Native American canoe for the two works Red Rivers (In Search of the Elusive Okapi) (a film of the journey, 2008) and Strip Canoe (African Walnut) (the canoe he travelled in, 2008). For Infestation Piece (Musselled Moore) (2007–08) Starling threw a replica of a Henry Moore sculpture into Lake Ontario and took it out a year later, once it had been covered with zebra mussels. This is, of course, a very partial summary of Starling’s work, but I hope my self-selection makes one thing clear: if transformation is key in Starling’s practice, so too is a fascination with natural, and in particular aquatic, settings – water as both the site and the agent of change.

Here Heraclitus’s dictum ‘you can never step into the same river twice’ might be more than apposite. (Starling’s comment in an interview that people distort his works in their memory, adding to them codicils that never happened, also seems fitting; his works change even once made.) Translation, by contrast, is repeatedly and joyfully stumped by its inability to perfectly render a sentence in one language into another: we need to look no further than Walter Benjamin’s The Task of the Translator (1923), or, more recently, Julian Barnes’s essay on Lydia Davis’s translation of Madame Bovary (Writer’s Writer and Writer’s Writer’s Writer, London Review of Books, November 2010) to see texts that begin by repudiating, again and again, the prospect of ideal translation. Where there is difference, singularity is affirmed and homogeneity kept at bay.

The origin as spectacle

And though Starling’s work is famously focused on transformation, the question of origin – real, material origin – is as important as any change incurred. In the exhibition he recently curated at the Camden Arts Centre, Never the Same River (Possible Futures, Probable Pasts), Starling selected works from the past fifty years of the institution and hung them in the exact positions where they had originally been placed. Indeed his work can be didactic in its presentation of origin: an early work from 1996 is a silver ladle, half of it still in ladle form, the other melted down into 20 pence pieces. Obviously ‘origin’ is a term here that is wider than its six letters: it moves to encompass the making of the thing (the ladle, or in Red Rivers, the canoe), the people who made it (the Glaswegian silversmiths, the Native Americans), the history they’ve endured and the reapparitions of those histories and forms since – and these go on. This narrative-bundling is what accounts for Starling’s work being called research-based, but it could also, in the best sense and in keeping with the theme of the works cited here, be called ‘casting a wide net’, opening up aesthetic enquiry to historical, social and economic domains.

Horse or motor scooter, who cares?

Unlike words, material is ineluctably trustworthy – we can see the same wood, the same metal being used – and at the ‘end’ of his transformative processes endured by his works, the changes are visible and, to an extent, legible. Shedboatshed both summarily truncates its journey, putting a stoppage to change in its reprisal of the wood’s first state of shed-ness, while at the same time using a literal journey down a river to actualise the piece.

This problem of representing both change and initial appearance is one that stretches across a variety of arenas. In the 19th century, John Ruskin and Viollet-le-Duc argued over how best to preserve buildings: Viollet-le-Duc held one should restore them to how they looked when they were first built, so that citizens could best understand the ideas as they were conceived; Ruskin argued that the cracks and fadings were indexical proof of the time that had passed. (This is a debate that was particularly important in post-World War II Germany’s rebuilding of its town centres, such as the Frauenkirche in Dresden or the centre of Munich, which were rebuilt as just as they had been before being destroyed in the war.) Important books bear the same problem – the style of the King James Bible was contemporary once; now a contemporary style for the Bible strikes us as dumbing the great religious work down. And do we want to hear in nineteenth-century literature the anachronisms that remind of us of a work’s agedness? Or is a book’s validity its eternal contemporariness; horse or motor scooter, we all know the emotions? These are the problems that face contemporary translators who approach works that have already been set, many times before, in another language.

Working in the more fluid medium of objects and performative processes, Starling sets origin and change side-by-side, and focuses on this fault line. His latest work at his gallery in Glasgow, the Modern Institute, shows Noh masks that are fastened to spindly tripods, looking both anthropomorphic and like inanimate coat hangers (Project for a Masquerade (Hiroshima): The Mirror Room, 2010). It is the moment when the actor puts on the inert mask and begins the ‘ritual’ of transforming into that character that Starling is interested in; represented here as half-person, half-object. They stand at the ready, prepared to become the players in the charade that art requires of them.

IMAGE CREDITS

Simon Starling, Shedboatshed (Mobile Architecture No. 2), 2005
Courtesy the Artist and The Modern Institute / Toby Webster Ltd. Glasgow

Simon Starling, Infestation piece (Musselled Moore), 2007-8
Bronze, mussels
Courtesy the Artist and The Modern Institute / Toby Webster Ltd. Glasgow

Simon Starling, Strip Canoe (African Walnut),Work in Progress, 2007-2008
Wooden canoe and former and steel trestles
Courtesy the Artist and The Modern Institute / Toby Webster Ltd. Glasgow

Simon Starling, Burn-Time, Installation view at Camden Arts Centre (detail), 2000
Courtesy the artist © Camden Arts Centre

Simon Starling, Project for a Masquerade (Hiroshima), 2010
Installation view, The Modern Institute
Courtesy the artist and The Modern Institute / Toby Webster Ltd. Glasgow

Simon Starling, Project for a Masquerade (Hiroshima), 2010
Courtesy the artist and The Modern Institute / Toby Webster Ltd. Glasgow

Français

Simon Starling

Traduction en cours

Melissa Gronlund

Le processus de traduction est au cœur du travail de Simon Starling. Son œuvre subit un cycle de transformations et passe d’un état à l’autre au même titre qu'un texte en cours de traduction. Melissa Gronlund analyse la pratique de l’artiste à travers ce prisme linguistique.

Quels sont les enjeux de la traduction ? Telle est la question que pose (ou évite) la revue Catalogue avec son format bilingue et sa mise en page en miroir. La traduction est aussi une manière d’approcher le travail de Simon Starling et ses recherches sur la transformation de la matière. Quelle est l'étape la plus importante de son œuvre : l'origine, la métamorphose ou le résultat ?

Henry Moore dans l'Ontario

Dans son célèbre Shedboatshed (2005), Starling démonte un abri en bois et récupère les matériaux pour construire une embarcation qu’il fait naviguer le long du Rhin. Une fois arrivé à destination, il reconstruit l’abri et l'expose tel quel. L’artiste a aussi sillonné le fleuve Hudson et la rivière Hoosic dans l’état de New York sur un traditionnel canoë indien. Le film Red Rivers (In Search of the Elusive Okapi) (2008) documente ce voyage et Strip Canoe (African Walnut) (2008) présente le canoë sur lequel il a navigué. Dans Infestation Piece (Musselled Moore) (2007–08), Starling immerge la copie d’une sculpture d’Henry Moore dans le lac Ontario. Il la repêche un an plus tard, une fois celle-ci entièrement recouverte de coquillages. On pourrait évoquer de nombreuses autres œuvres mais cette petite sélection prouve déjà à quel point la transformation est au cœur de son travail. Ces processus de transformation sont souvent naturels et essentiellement d'origine aquatique, l’eau étant à la fois le lieu et la cause de la métamorphose.

La maxime d’Héraclite “On ne se baigne jamais deux fois dans le même fleuve” semble ici particulièrement appropriée. (À ce propos, Starling remarque lors d'un entretien que les spectateurs ajoutent souvent des éléments imaginaires aux souvenirs de ses œuvres. Même terminé, son travail continue de changer). La traduction, au contraire, est constamment restreinte par l’impossibilité d’exprimer parfaitement une phrase dans une autre langue que celle d’origine. Le texte de Walter Benjamin La tâche du traducteur (1923), ou, plus récemment l’essai de Julian Barnes sur la traduction de Madame Bovary par Lydia Davis (Writer’s Writer and Writer’s Writer’s Writer, London Review of Books, 2010) rejettent entièrement la possibilité d’une traduction idéale. Pour ces auteurs, la différence d'une langue à l'autre est une singularité qui doit être conservée.

Mise en scène d'origine

Bien que le travail de Starling s'articule essentiellement autour du processus de transformation, l'origine matérielle de l'objet est aussi importante que le changement qui lui est imposé. Dans sa récente exposition Never the Same River (Possible Futures, Probable Pasts) (2010) au Camden Arts Centre de Londres, l'artiste a sélectionné des œuvres déjà montrées dans le lieu et les a réinstallées à l'endroit précis de leur première présentation. Chez Starling, la mise en scène de l’origine frôle parfois le didactisme : une de ses premières œuvres de 1996 est une louche en argent en partie refondue pour couler des pièces de 20 pence, une référence à l'expression "naître avec une cuillère en argent dans la bouche". Starling exploite le mot "origine" dans son sens le plus large : le terme englobe à la fois la fabrication de l’objet (la louche, ou, dans Red Rivers, le canoë), les gens qui l’ont fabriqué (les orfèvres de Glasgow, les indiens d’Amérique), leurs histoires respectives, ainsi que la manière dont ces histoires et ces objets ont pu depuis refaire surface – le cycle est infini. L'agrégat de récits exploités par Starling est le fruit d'un travail de "recherche" : une investigation esthétique qui ratisse large en s'ouvrant à l’histoire, la sociologie et l’économie.

Cheval ou scooter, quelle importance ?

Contrairement aux mots, on peut faire confiance aux matériaux et vérifier que c'est bien le même bois ou le même métal qui a été utilisé. À la fin d’un cycle de transformation, les différentes étapes du processus sont encore visibles, voire même lisibles. Dans Shedboatshed, le bois reprend la forme initiale de l'abri et empêche ainsi la possibilité d’un autre état. Ce retour court-circuite tout cheminement vers une nouvelle étape sans pour autant abandonner le cheminement littéral du bateau le long de la rivière.

Arriver à faire coexister l'état initial d'une chose et sa transformation est un problème que l’on retrouve dans de nombreux domaines. Au XIXème siècle, John Ruskin et Eugène Viollet-le-Duc ont débattu âprement sur la meilleure manière de préserver les bâtiments historiques. Pour Viollet-le-Duc, il fallait rénover et garder l'aspect initial des bâtiments afin que les citoyens comprennent les idées sous-jacentes à leur construction. Ruskin pensait au contraire qu'il fallait laisser les craquelures et dégradations apparentes pour mesurer le passage du temps. (Ce débat a été particulièrement important en Allemagne au lendemain de la deuxième guerre mondiale : certains quartiers tels que la Frauenkirche à Dresde ou le centre ville de Munich ont été reconstruits à l'identique). On se retrouve face aux mêmes difficultés pour les chefs d'œuvre de la littérature : la bible du roi Jacques est une traduction contemporaine pour l'époque, mais si on devait lire aujourd'hui une bible écrite dans un style contemporain, elle nous paraîtrait ridicule et inappropriée. La traduction d'une œuvre du XIXème siècle doit-elle garder les signes distinctifs de son époque ? Si la qualité d’un livre repose sur son éternelle contemporanéité, cheval ou scooter, quelle importance ? Les émotions sont les mêmes. Voilà les problèmes que rencontrent les traducteurs aujourd'hui lorsqu’ils s’attellent à des œuvres déjà traduites de nombreuses fois.

Starling travaille le processus de transformation des objets, un médium sans doute plus fluide que le langage. Il place l'objet d'origine et l'objet transformé côte à côte et explore ce qui les sépare. Une de ses dernières œuvres, récemment exposée au Modern Institute à Glasgow, est une série de masques Nô accrochés à de fragiles pupitres aux allures de portemanteaux et de corps humains inanimés (Project for a Masquerade (Hiroshima): The Mirror Room, 2010). Starling s’intéresse au moment ‘rituel’ où l'acteur revêt son masque et devient un personnage : mi-hommes, mi-objets, les œuvres sont ainsi prêtes à endosser le rôle que l’art de Starling leur impose.

IMAGE CREDITS

Simon Starling, Shedboatshed (Mobile Architecture No. 2), 2005
Courtesy the Artist and The Modern Institute / Toby Webster Ltd. Glasgow

Simon Starling, Infestation piece (Musselled Moore), 2007-8
Bronze, mussels
Courtesy the Artist and The Modern Institute / Toby Webster Ltd. Glasgow

Simon Starling, Strip Canoe (African Walnut),Work in Progress, 2007-2008
Wooden canoe and former and steel trestles
Courtesy the Artist and The Modern Institute / Toby Webster Ltd. Glasgow

Simon Starling, Burn-Time, Installation view at Camden Arts Centre (detail), 2000
Courtesy the artist © Camden Arts Centre

Simon Starling, Project for a Masquerade (Hiroshima), 2010
Installation view, The Modern Institute
Courtesy the artist and The Modern Institute / Toby Webster Ltd. Glasgow

Simon Starling, Project for a Masquerade (Hiroshima), 2010
Courtesy the artist and The Modern Institute / Toby Webster Ltd. Glasgow

 
advertisement advertisement advertisement