artwork image
artwork image
artwork image
artwork image
artwork image
artwork image
artwork image

English

Saâdane Afif

Process in Motion

Andreas Schlaegel

2009 Prix Marcel Duchamp-winner Saâdane Afif shares a Berlin cup of coffee with Andreas Schlaegel and gets down to basics: processes, networks, creative loneliness, and his fascination for little-known-but-legendary conceptual artist, André Cadere.

Catalogue: Tell me about your relation to Cadere.

Saâdane Afif: It’s something like voodoo, I sometimes ‘invoke’ him in my work, as a reminder that we don’t start from nothing. He was into mathematics and developed codes that I use to give a structure to my own pieces, especially when dealing with light and music. He’s known as the guy with the stick, a kind of squatter or a Don Quixote of the arts, but he also spent ten years writing a statement revealing what is basically a philosophical and mathematical concept. Today we deal less with radical statements and more with fairy tales and legends, and his concepts have become a part of these fairy tales. I use Cadere’s mathematical permutations as a kind of software, like in the guitars’ sequence at Documenta 12 (2007). Nobody notices, of course.

C: I thought it had to do with your having been a drummer, someone who is in the background, structuring time ...

S.A: That was a long time ago! I drummed a bit when I was young, as a teenager. I had enough rhythm to drum something, even to survive for ten years, but not to progress. I never learned anything and stopped when I left art school, because it’s quite difficult to travel with a drum kit on your back! Recently I started again a bit. It is interesting because it enables me to apply a structure to an experience that I know. But I’m not a drummer. My approach to all these things is not that of a musician, but of a sculptor.

C: You said that you use the process in your work as a resonance chamber, an amplifier for meanings. That seems to be a good way to describe the importance of process-oriented works today, say those of Simon Starling, whose practice is obviously quite different from yours.

S.A: With Simon you get a sense of narration, the story begins there and ends here, it’s linear or circular. It’s close to the idea of the loop in cinema. My approach is more basic: I establish relationships, between, say, an object and a writer. The writer starts from the work and develops something else. Then I work with a musician, and his record could be the beginning of a new piece. Starting from a simple cup of coffee, it keeps growing, growing, growing … That’s what I call the amplification of meaning, it’s something very simple at the base. It’s not an explanation, it’s an amplification.

C: In volume ....

S.A: In volume! And of something that will resist direct comprehension. Perhaps like the electrification of sound.

“I follow the process of the piece and allow it to restart at certain points where I try to inject new pieces.”

C: But it’s an organic development, and it sounds almost baroque in the sense that there are a lot of reflections. Is there symmetry in this amplified structure?

S.A: Yes, there is some symmetry, and it is very organised and directed, as I am working with someone else every time. But I also like blank spaces. There are reflections but there are also distortions, like with an effect. We can follow the music metaphor here: it’s like when you plug your guitar into an effects pedal, the pure sound of the guitar is the starting point of something new. I follow the process of the piece and allow it to restart at certain points where I try to inject new pieces. But there is also the potential of repetition. In French, the word ‘repetition’ means both repetition and rehearsal. The structure is not so clear, it goes from connection to connection.

“When I first asked people to write songs about my work, it was because I was so fed up with documentation, the reviews, the promotional or the didactic approach: it was always a repetition of the work.”

C: Do you draw flowcharts of these processes?

S.A: No, I never tried to understand it exactly. It’s like a net, but a bit messy sometimes. The basis of the process is very naive, very pop. When I first asked people to write songs about my work, it was because I was so fed up with documentation, the reviews, the promotional or the didactic approach: it was always a repetition of the work. If you face a work of art you don’t have to explain it directly, it’s not necessary! At least not in the way of finding an answer to the question ‘what does the artist want his work to mean’. I figured out that my position to a piece of art would be one of interrogation, as you would approach a piece of poetry, resisting any notion of direct understanding. So I started to experiment with Lili Reynaud-Dewar, an artist and a writer, and asked her to write some texts on my work, based on what I told her about it, but also to keep her own view. I was very surprised with the result. The poems are very precise, they express something about the piece, there is a deep link between both, and at the same time they are autonomous. After this I started to develop a lot of relations with musicians and writers. Sometimes the piece is not so good, but the text is, sometimes it is the song that is very good … Then again, it is what I do afterwards that is better than all the things that came before. It’s a process in motion.

C: This also brings in a sense of the romantically incomplete, and the way that there is always the possibility of mistake or misinterpretation …

S.A: I try to be very precise when I commission a text. It’s a big part of the work, trying to express precisely what I want from the author and why. It’s a statement. I tell things to the writers that the audience in the gallery doesn’t know. And I only ask a very close network of people.

C: So it’s not about something like participation, or Nicolas Bourriaud’s relational aesthetics.

S.A: Many people regarded the idea of relational aesthetics as a recipe, but it’s a basic observation of something that existed before and will exist afterwards. During the ‘90s a group of artists agreed to share ideas, they are still doing that. The best illustration of this was Annlee1, that was very interesting for me. I was not a part of that group, I arrived later, but I was deeply uneasy with the idea that you’re alone in relation to the museum, to the gallery. I realised if I can share some ideas, I won’t be alone in my ivory tower.

1] Annlee is a Japanese computer-animated character, designed as a commodity intended for use in either Manga (Japanese adult comics) or in a commercial environment. Her copyright was bought by the French artists Philippe Parreno and Pierre Huyghe, who have used Annlee in works of art. The two artists then approached a few friends, including Liam Gillick, offering Annlee to them as an extension of the collaborative sensibility that has developed between them over recent years. See http://www.tate.org.uk/britain/exhibitions/gillick.htm.

IMAGE CREDITS

Saâdane Afif, Black Chords, 2007
Exhibition view, Documenta 12, Kassel 2007
11 elecric guitars, 11 amplifiers, 11 automatons, computer, software
Variable dimensions
Unique piece
Courtesy: the artist

Saâdane Afif, Vice de Forme, 2009
Bianco statuario marble
10.5 x 10.5 x 10.5 cm; Ø14 cm; Ø 7,5 cm H: 31, 5 cm
Edition of 25 (+ 7 A.P.)
Courtesy Galerie Mehdi Chouakri, Berlin
Photo: Jan Windszus, Berlin

Saâdane Afif, Essence, 2009
Neon, metal, transformer
60 x 150 cm
Edition of 3
Courtesy Galerie Mehdi Chouakri, Berlin
Photo: Jan Windszus, Berlin

Saâdane Afif, Untitled (Blue Time, 2004/ Wood, varnish, amplifier, microphone, cables / Diameter 35 cm), 2008
Wood, varnish, amplifier, microphone, cables
Variable dimensions
Unique piece
Courtesy Galerie Mehdi Chouakri, Berlin
Photo: Jan Windszus, Berlin

Saâdane Afif, Untitled (Ghost, 2005/ White paint from four different brands, wood/ 185 x 3,5 cm), 2008
Wood, white paint from four different brands, metal
H: 73cm, Ø 22 cm
Unique piece
Courtesy Galerie Mehdi Chouakri, Berlin
Photo: Jan Windszus, Berlin

Saâdane Afif, Lady Liberty’s Bones (Material for procession), 2009
Wood, metal, black lacquer, scale model, handlebar tape, cycling tricots, poster, metronom, Eiermann-table
180 x 180 x 50 cm
Unique piece
Courtesy Galerie Mehdi Chouakri, Berlin
Photo: Jan Windszus, Berlin

Saâdane Afif, Untitled (More, More, 2006 / Neon, pile of photocopies / 110 x 50 cm), 2009
Neon, pile of photocopies
132 x 100 cm
Unique piece
Courtesy Galerie Mehdi Chouakri, Berlin
Photo: Jan Windszus, Berlin

Français

Saâdane Afif

Cycle continu

Andreas Schlaegel

Lauréat du Prix Marcel Duchamp 2009, Saâdane Afif rencontre Andreas Schlaegel dans un café berlinois pour discuter processus, connexions, solitude de l’artiste et face cachée d’André Cadere.

Catalogue : Parle-moi de ta relation avec Cadere.

Saâdane Afif : C’est un peu comme du vaudou, de temps en temps je l’invoque dans mon travail pour rappeler qu’on ne part pas de rien. Son truc, c’était les mathématiques, il a développé des codes que j’utilise pour donner une structure à mes œuvres, en particulier quand je travaille avec de la musique ou des effets lumineux. On se souvient de lui comme du "mec au bâton", une sorte de vagabond ou de Don Quichotte de l’art, mais il a aussi passé dix ans à écrire un manifeste mathématique et philosophique. Aujourd’hui, on a de moins en moins affaire à des déclarations d’intention radicales mais plutôt à des contes et à des légendes, et les idées de Cadere ont été assimilées à ces contes. Dans mon travail, j’utilise ses permutations mathématiques comme on utiliserait un programme. C’était le cas de la séquence des guitares dans mon installation à la Documenta 12 (2007). Bien entendu, personne ne s’en rend compte.

C : Je pensais que ça avait avoir avec le fait que tu avais été batteur, quelqu’un qui structure le temps, en arrière-plan …

S.A : Ça, c’était il y a très longtemps! J’ai fait un peu de batterie quand j’étais ado. J’étais assez bon pour tenir un rythme, et même survivre en tant que batteur pendant dix ans, mais pas assez pour réellement progresser. Je n’ai jamais vraiment appris, j’ai fini par arrêter quand j’ai quitté l’école d’art, parce que ce n’est pas facile de voyager avec une batterie sur le dos ! J’ai repris récemment, ça me permet d’appliquer une structure sur une expérience qui m’est familière, mais je ne suis pas un batteur. J’approche ce genre de choses comme un sculpteur, pas comme un musicien.

C : Tu as dit que tu utilisais le "processus" comme une caisse de résonance, comme un amplificateur. Cela pourrait aussi décrire l’importance aujourd’hui des œuvres basées sur des processus, par exemple le travail de Simon Starling, même si son œuvre est bien évidemment très différente de la tienne.

S.A : Dans le travail de Simon, il y a une vraie narration, l’histoire a un début et une fin. C’est linéaire ou circulaire, un peu comme une boucle cinématographique. Ce que je fais est plus simple : j’établis des relations entre, par exemple, un objet et un auteur. L’auteur part de l’œuvre et développe quelque chose. Ensuite, je travaille avec un musicien et son disque peut provoquer une autre œuvre. On peut prendre comme point de départ un simple café puis les choses évoluent, grandissent et changent. C’est ce que j’appelle "l’amplification du sens", c’est vraiment très simple au départ. Ce n’est pas une explication, mais une amplification.

C : En volume sonore ...

S.A : En volume! C’est aussi le développement de tout ce qui résiste à une compréhension directe, un petit peu comme l’électrification du son.

“Je mène à bien le processus de l’œuvre, mais je le laisse ouvert à d’autres orientations.”

C : Mais c’est un développement très organique. Toutes ces réflexions rappellent presque l’idée de baroque. Est-ce qu’il y a une symétrie dans cette structure amplifiée ?

S.A : Oui, il y a une certaine symétrie. C’est très organisé et précis puisque je travaille avec d’autres gens en permanence. En revanche, j’aime aussi laisser des espaces blancs. Il y a des réflexions, mais également beaucoup de transformations, c’est comme un "effet". On peut filer ici la métaphore musicale, lorsque l’on rajoute un effet à une guitare électrique, le son "pur" est le point de départ de quelque chose de complètement nouveau. C’est un peu pareil dans mon travail : je mène à bien le processus de l’œuvre, mais je le laisse ouvert à d’autres orientations pour pouvoir insérer de nouvelles pièces. Le potentiel de la répétition m'intéresse. "Répétition" veut à la fois dire "réitérer" et "apprendre" ou "perfectionner" un morceau de musique. La structure n’est pas toujours claire, elle fonctionne de connexions en connexions.

“J’ai commencé à demander à des gens d’écrire des chansons sur mon travail, parce que j’en avais assez de toute la documentation, les comptes-rendus, les communiqués de presse et les ‘interprétations’ qui accompagnent l’art : c’est toujours une redite.”

C : Est-ce que tu dessines des organigrammes de ces processus ?

S.A : Non, je ne cherche pas à les décortiquer. C’est un réseau, un peu emmêlé parfois, mais toujours très naïf, très "pop" à la base. J’ai commencé à demander à des gens d’écrire des chansons sur mon travail, parce que j’en avais assez de toute la documentation, les comptes-rendus, les communiqués de presse et les ‘interprétations’ qui accompagnent l’art : c’est toujours une redite. Il n’est pas nécessaire d’expliquer l’œuvre, surtout pas pour essayer de trouver "ce que l’artiste a voulu dire". J’ai décidé que mon attitude vis-à-vis de l’œuvre serait celle d’une interrogation, comme on approche un poème, en résistant à l’envie de comprendre. J’ai commencé à tester cette idée avec l’artiste et auteur Lili Reynaud-Dewar. Je lui ai demandé d’écrire des textes sur mon travail, basés sur ce que je lui avais dit, mais aussi sur sa propre perception. J’étais très surpris du résultat, les poèmes sont à la fois très précis, ils sont clairement liés à l’œuvre, et en même temps ils sont autonomes. Après cette première expérience, j’ai travaillé avec des musiciens et d’autres auteurs. Parfois l’œuvre n’est pas très bonne, par contre le texte qui en découle, lui, marche bien. Parfois, c’est la chanson qui fonctionne le mieux. Finalement, c’est le résultat qui est le plus important, ce que je fais après tous ces développements. C’est un processus en mouvement.

C : Cela fait aussi penser à l’idée romantique de l’œuvre inachevée, il y a toujours la possibilité d’une erreur ou d’un contresens…

S.A : J’essaie d’être très clair lorsque je commande un texte. C’est une partie importante de mon travail : exprimer, de la manière la plus précise possible, ce que j’attends d’un auteur et pourquoi. C’est presque une déclaration d’intention. Je dis des choses à mes collaborateurs que le public des musées ne sait pas, et je ne travaille qu’avec des gens que je connais très bien.

C: Donc ton œuvre ne relève pas vraiment de la participation, ou de l’esthétique relationnelle de Nicolas Bourriaud.

S.A: Beaucoup de gens considèrent cette idée d’esthétique relationnelle comme une recette miracle, alors que ce n’est finalement que l’observation de ce qui existait avant cette ‘étiquette’, et qui existera après. Dans les années 1990, un groupe d’artistes s’est mis d’accord sur un certain nombre d’idées, sur lesquelles, d’ailleurs, ils s’accordent toujours. Le meilleur exemple est sans doute Annlee1, qui était un concept fascinant pour moi. Je ne faisais pas partie de ce groupe, je suis arrivé plus tard. J’ai toujours été très impressionné par cette idée que l’artiste est seul face au musée, face à la galerie. Puis je me suis rendu compte que si je partageais mes idées, je ne serais plus prisonnier de ma tour d’ivoire.

1] Annlee est un personnage animé par ordinateur. Elle a été concue comme un objet, à l'origine destinée aux Mangas (les bandes dessinées japonaises pour adultes) ou à un environnement commercial. Les droits d’Annlee ont été achetés par les artistes Philippe Parreno et Pierre Huygue qui ont utilisé Annlee dans leurs œuvres. Les deux artistes ont ensuite contacté des amis, dont l’artiste Liam Gillick, en leur proposant d’utiliser Annlee pour continuer les collaborations développées entre eux depuis plusieurs années. http://www.tate.org.uk/britain/exhibitions/gillick.htm (12.1.10)

IMAGE CREDITS

Saâdane Afif, Black Chords, 2007
Exhibition view, Documenta 12, Kassel 2007
11 elecric guitars, 11 amplifiers, 11 automatons, computer, software
Variable dimensions
Unique piece
Courtesy: the artist

Saâdane Afif, Vice de Forme, 2009
Bianco statuario marble
10.5 x 10.5 x 10.5 cm; Ø14 cm; Ø 7,5 cm H: 31, 5 cm
Edition of 25 (+ 7 A.P.)
Courtesy Galerie Mehdi Chouakri, Berlin
Photo: Jan Windszus, Berlin

Saâdane Afif, Essence, 2009
Neon, metal, transformer
60 x 150 cm
Edition of 3
Courtesy Galerie Mehdi Chouakri, Berlin
Photo: Jan Windszus, Berlin

Saâdane Afif, Untitled (Blue Time, 2004/ Wood, varnish, amplifier, microphone, cables / Diameter 35 cm), 2008
Wood, varnish, amplifier, microphone, cables
Variable dimensions
Unique piece
Courtesy Galerie Mehdi Chouakri, Berlin
Photo: Jan Windszus, Berlin

Saâdane Afif, Untitled (Ghost, 2005/ White paint from four different brands, wood/ 185 x 3,5 cm), 2008
Wood, white paint from four different brands, metal
H: 73cm, Ø 22 cm
Unique piece
Courtesy Galerie Mehdi Chouakri, Berlin
Photo: Jan Windszus, Berlin

Saâdane Afif, Lady Liberty’s Bones (Material for procession), 2009
Wood, metal, black lacquer, scale model, handlebar tape, cycling tricots, poster, metronom, Eiermann-table
180 x 180 x 50 cm
Unique piece
Courtesy Galerie Mehdi Chouakri, Berlin
Photo: Jan Windszus, Berlin

Saâdane Afif, Untitled (More, More, 2006 / Neon, pile of photocopies / 110 x 50 cm), 2009
Neon, pile of photocopies
132 x 100 cm
Unique piece
Courtesy Galerie Mehdi Chouakri, Berlin
Photo: Jan Windszus, Berlin

 
advertisement advertisement advertisement