artwork image
artwork image
artwork image
artwork image
artwork image
artwork image
artwork image
artwork image
artwork image

English

Peles Empire, a Short History

Coline Milliard

As the artist collective Peles Empire opens its new space in London, Coline Milliard goes back to the origins of a venture that defies simple categorisation.

Few projects are built on indeterminacy, but for the Peles Empire change is a cornerstone. Set up in 2005 by Barbara Wolff, Katharina Stöver and Marc J. Cohen, this pigeonhole-defying venture is by turns a salon, an art installation and an exhibition space, often all of these at once. It was modeled after the Romanian Peles Castle, an exuberant example of 19th-century Slavonic luxury nestled at the foot of the Carpathians. As it exists now, the palace is a genuine mishmash of architectural styles: each of its 160 rooms has its own historicist decoration, ranging from Gothic to Art Deco through Italian Baroque. This grotesque pastiche was for the collective an inspirational trigger (one that nods to Wolff’s Romanian origins). They embraced the doomed-to-fail idea of recreating all the rooms one by one, copying the copy in an ironic mise en abîme. ‘There’s something very free but also very slavish in the reproduction of all these artistic styles’, Wolff admits. ‘We’re interested in this in-betweenness.’ Over the last four years, the Peles Empire’s anachronistic bubbles have popped up in Frankfurt, London and Los Angeles, and in December the project re-opens in Stoke Newington with a full-blown exhibition programme.

Castle in the air

It started almost by chance. While Wolff and Stöver were studying at Frankfurt’s Städelschule – both artists have kept an individual practice – a room in their shared flat became free. It was soon transformed into the Peles’ Prince’s Bedroom, completed with wall coverings blown-up from a postcard of the palatial chamber and glittering bits of found furniture. Located at the center of the city’s Red Light district, the Prince’s Bedroom operated as an alternative social space, where the arty crowd of Frankfurt gathered every Thursday night in a golden, candlelit atmosphere. ‘It was really the only area in the city where you could create these little capsules without anyone bothering you about it’, remembers Stöver. Dancers and musicians regularly performed, and on Cohen’s impulse a supper club was set up. ‘This part of town used to be a thriving area’, says Stöver. ‘In some way, we were superimposing some of the area’s past grandeur on its current reality.’ Each visitor became part of this ‘castle in the air’, actualizing the notion of viewer-participant. ‘When we started, we basically invited people to socialize in an artwork’, Wolff remembers. The Peles Empire was something to be inhabited, not looked at.

From Allen Ruppersberg’s Al’s Café (1969) and Al’s Grand Hotel (1971) to more recent examples of Relational Aesthetics-labeled pieces such as Rirkrit Tiravanija’s, the artwork-cum-social space has numerous antecedents. If they are well aware of these examples, the duo (Cohen left in 2008) locates the origin of the project in its members’ artistic training. Wolff says that they ‘have been quite influenced by the teaching at the Städelschule’ – directed by 2009 Venice Biennale’s curator Daniel Birnbaum – ‘and their insistence on the fact that you can really include as much or as little as you want in your work’. And ingredients of all kinds, too: the Städelschule is one of the very rare art schools to offer cooking seminars as part of its regular programme, an unusual way to encourage the students to experiment with alternatives to art-making.

The fake, faked

London’s first Peles’ incarnation, in October 2005, was the German Renaissance-style Florentine Hall. Brilliant chandeliers and opulent marble fireplaces were again printed on wallpaper and pasted all over the group’s living room in Bethnal Green. As in Frankfurt, the Peles Empire quickly found a niche in London’s art scene, soon welcoming a circle of regulars every week more numerous. This ‘relational’ aspect is nonetheless only a strand in a practice mainly focused on the superimposition of historical layers and the dissection of the transformation process. The Peles Empire functions according to Russian doll logic: it appropriates an image, itself based on a 19th-century architectural fantasy. The ‘original’, flattened out by the photographic process, is fleshed out again, reinvestigating the three dimensional space. This cycle of transmutation creates fictional loops in history, temporarily bypassing reality to embrace make-believe. And the installations often resonate with their actual surroundings. In Los Angeles, during a residency at the Modernist apartment Mackey House in 2007, the Peles Empire recreated the King’s Study, a quietly impressive space characterized by its grand wood panels. ‘In California, most of the houses are built with timber, says Stöver, ‘and the King’s Study was in some ways responding to this. It turned local architecture inside out’.

Over the years, the Peles Empire has progressively moved from social gatherings to monthly exhibitions. Among many other artists, Lia Anna Hennig, Sarah Ortmeyer, Kerstin Cmelka and Jack Newling have shown their works in the installation, and both Seb Patane and Mark Leckey have curated shows for them. ‘Including other artworks adds a new layer to all these layers of time and history already present in our project’, says Wolff. ‘Somehow, these works become part of the Peles.’ The duo also raises the ever present issue of the propriety of the white cube. ‘I suppose we are just trying to experiment with alternative solutions’, offers Stöver.

Shifting grounds

‘The Peles is an artwork, but every new room is also an artwork in itself’, Wolff adds. In November, the duo took part in Transformation, a show of recent works by Deutsche Bank Award winners. The bank’s exhibition space was turned into a Romanian Music Hall, the installation working this time as a paper jewel box to set off Wolff and Stöver’s individual works. The wallpaper gradually shifted from colour to black and white, visually contrasting with the single artworks’ hues and materializing a primary characteristic of the project. ‘The concept of shift, in time but also in quality and materiality, is central to the Peles’, says Stöver. With their new space opening this month, the Peles Empire is shifting one more time, starting yet again another chapter of its multilayered history.

Peles Empire
55 Kynaston Road
London
N16 0EB

IMAGE CREDITS

Images 1,2,3: Peles London (E2 7EG), 2005

Peles London,Interceptor (Tim Ellis, Jack Newling), 2007

Peles Los Angeles, Schindler house, 2007

The big armory (Tomas Downes, Angus Sanders-Dunnachie, Sidney Mueller), Maes & Matthys Gallery, Antwerp, 2009

Apartementul Imperial (Jack Newling, Thomas Livesey, Katharina Stöver), Basel Liste, 2008

Images 8, 9:Geodesic, (Barbara Wolff, Katharina Stöver), Deutsche Bank, London, 2009

Français

La vie de château du Peles Empire

Coline Milliard

Alors que le collectif d’artistes Peles Empire inaugure son nouvel espace d’exposition, Coline Milliard revient sur l’histoire d’un projet qui défie toutes catégorisations.

Peu de projets peuvent revendiquer une identité aussi fluide que le Peles Empire. Initiée en 2005 par Barbara Wolff, Katharina Stöver et Marc J. Cohen, cette structure protéiforme est tout à la fois un salon, une installation et un espace d’exposition. Le Peles Empire est le rejeton imaginaire d’un château roumain, le Peles, flamboyant exemple d’exubérance slave construit au 19eme siècle au pied des Carpates. Le palais d’origine est un kaléidoscope de styles architecturaux : chacune de ses 160 pièces a sa propre décoration historiciste, allant du gothique à l’Art Déco en passant par le baroque italien. Clin d’œil aux origines roumaines de Wolff, ce pastiche grotesque a été un véritable déclic pour le collectif qui s’est donné le but donquichottesque de reproduire toutes les pièces du château une par une, copiant la copie dans une savoureuse mise en abîme. “Il y a quelque chose de libérateur, mais aussi de très servile dans cette idée de répétition”, explique Wolff. “C’est cet entre-deux qui nous intéresse.” Au fil des ans, les petites bulles d’anachronisme du Peles Empire ont fait surface à Francfort, Londres et Los Angeles ; et au mois de décembre le collectif rouvre ses portes au nord de Londres, à Stoke Newington, avec un nouveau programme d’expositions.

Château en Espagne

Tout a commencé presque par hasard ; Wolff et Stöver étaient étudiantes à Francfort à la Städelschule (les deux artistes ont gardé une pratique individuelle) quand une chambre de leur colocation s’est retrouvée vide. Elle a vite été transformée en Chambre du Prince, grâce à une carte postale des appartements royaux agrandie en papier peint et quelques meubles mordorés récoltés ça et là. Située au cœur du quartier rouge, la Chambre du Prince devient un lieu de rencontres alternatif où tous les jeudis soirs une foule artistique et bigarrée se rassemble à la lumière chaude des bougies. “C’était vraiment le seul endroit à Francfort où l’on pouvait créer ces petites capsules hors du temps sans que personne ne s’en mêle”, se souvient Stöver. Des spectacles de danse et de musique sont improvisés. Cohen, chef cuisinier de formation, y ouvre même pour quelques jours un restaurant gastronomique. “C’était un endroit très bourgeois dans le passé. D’une certaine manière, on rendait au quartier un peu de sa grandeur disparue.” Dès le départ, les visiteurs sont partie prenante de cette sorte de château en Espagne, réactualisant la notion de spectateur/acteur. “On invitait les gens à se rencontrer dans une œuvre.” Le Peles Empire a d’abord été conçu pour être habité, et non pas regardé.

Depuis l’Al Café (1969) et l’Al Grand Hotel (1971) d’Allen Ruppersberg jusqu’aux exemples plus récents d’“Esthétique Relationnelle” à la Rirkrit Tirvanija, l’œuvre d’art comme espace de socialisation a de nombreux antécédents. Mais c’est dans leur parcours artistique plus que dans cette récente histoire de l’art que les artistes du Peles Empire placent l’origine du projet. “Je pense que nous avons été assez influencées par la manière d’enseigner à la Städelschule (dirigée par Daniel Birnbaum, commissaire de la biennale de Venise 2009) et la grande liberté avec laquelle on nous encourageait à travailler.” Incidemment, la Städelschule est l'une des seules écoles d’art au monde à avoir mis au programme des leçons de cuisine, une façon originale d’encourager les étudiants à multiplier les expériences.

Faux semblant

Le Peles Empire ouvre à Londres en octobre 2005 avec le Hall Florentin, de style Renaissance allemande. Des chandeliers scintillants et d’opulentes cheminées en marbre sont une fois de plus métamorphosés en papier peint recouvrant cette fois les murs de l’appartement de Wolff et Stöver à Bethnal Green. Comme à Francfort, le Peles est vite devenu un incontournable de la scène londonienne, accueillant un cercle d’habitués un peu plus nombreux chaque semaine. Cet aspect purement “relationnel” n’est pourtant qu’une branche d’un projet dont le but premier est la superposition de strates historiques et la dissection du processus de transformation. Le Peles Empire fonctionne selon une logique de poupée russe, il s’approprie une image, elle-même basée sur une fantaisie architecturale du 19eme siècle. Le faux est falsifié ; l’original, “aplati” par le procédé photographique de la carte postale, réinvestit par l’installation l’espace tridimensionnel. Ce cycle de transmutations successives court-circuite le développement linéaire de l’histoire, il abandonne temporairement le réel pour l’imaginaire. Les installations conservent cependant souvent un lien tangible avec leurs environnements. Ainsi à Los Angeles en 2007, lors d’une résidence à la Mackey House, le Peles Empire a mis en place le Cabinet du Roi, une pièce impressionnante de solennité, tapissée de lambris. “En Californie, la plupart des maisons sont construites en bois”, explique Stöver. “Le Cabinet du Roi répondait à cette situation en présentant “l’envers” de l’architecture locale.”

Progressivement, le Peles Empire est passé de lieu de rencontres à lieu d’exposition. Lia Anna Hennig, Sarah Ortmeyer, Kerstin Cmelka, Jack Newling et bien d’autres artistes ont présenté leur travail dans l’installation ; Seb Patane et Marc Leckey y ont même joué les commissaires. “Choisir d’inclure d’autres œuvres, c’était une manière de rajouter une strate supplémentaire à toutes ces strates d’histoire déjà si présentes dans notre projet. Ces œuvres font partie de l’installation, elles sont comme absorbées.” Avec ces expositions, le duo repose aussi la question ancienne mais toujours pertinente du white cube comme lieu idéal de monstration. “On essaye modestement de proposer une autre solution.”

Mouvances

“Le Peles est une œuvre, mais chaque nouvelle pièce est aussi un œuvre indépendante.” En novembre, le collectif a pris part à l’exposition Transformation dans l’espace d’exposition de la Deutsche Bank. Le grand hall a été transformé en Salon de musique, l’installation servant d’écrin à la présentation des travaux personnels des deux artistes. Pour la première fois, le papier peint passe graduellement de la couleur au noir et blanc ; non seulement ce dégradé chromatique contraste avec les nuances des œuvres exposées mais il met aussi en scène une des caractéristiques majeures du projet. “Le passage d’un état à l’autre, entre différentes zones de temps, mais aussi entre différentes qualités matérielles, est pour nous primordial.” Le Peles Empire passe maintenant de Bethnal Green à Stoke Newington, inaugurant un nouveau chapitre de son histoire d’histoires.

Peles Empire
55 Kynaston Road
Londres
N16 0EB

IMAGE CREDITS

Images 1,2,3: Peles London (E2 7EG), 2005

Peles London,Interceptor (Tim Ellis, Jack Newling), 2007

Peles Los Angeles, Schindler house, 2007

The big armory (Tomas Downes, Angus Sanders-Dunnachie, Sidney Mueller), Maes & Matthys Gallery, Antwerp, 2009

Apartementul Imperial (Jack Newling, Thomas Livesey, Katharina Stöver), Basel Liste, 2008

Images 8, 9:Geodesic, (Barbara Wolff, Katharina Stöver), Deutsche Bank, London, 2009

 
advertisement advertisement advertisement