artwork image

English

Pavilion Projects

Jesse R. McKee

Part of Montreal’s artistic community for the past decade, Pavilion Projects is a complex entity mixing curatorial collective, artistic platform and cultural marketing firm. But where do they really stand?

My first encounter with Pavilion Projects was in the autumn of 2005. My roommate at the time was asked to lend a helping hand to his friend’s band during an event forming part of the annual Pop Montreal festival. Pavilion Projects had mounted a collaborative project between several contemporary artists and independent musicians, which took the shape of an open-air concert in the city’s brutalist park, Square Viger. In the tradition of a fête galante, I watched my roommate get costumed-up as part of the two-man, four-armed drummer backing the band Awesome’s session of heavy and epic art rock. All the while, the artist Will Munro shot off fireworks around the band in the midst of the square’s concrete slabs and still-water ponds.

Pavilion Projects, comprised of Maryse Larivière and Robin Simpson, could be easily described as a curatorial collective. However, its own self-determining language shifts from project to project. Artistic platform, cultural marketing firm, a bunch of bratty activists or well-read bons vivants, all these terms could be used to describe the group and frame its output. And it has been a nomadic, homeless and completely integral part of Montreal’s artistic community since 2004.

Institutional Critique

To understand Pavilion Projects’ impetus, the idea of collectivity needs a bit of unpacking from a Canadian perspective. If you were to walk through any of the high-walled museums and art institutions across the country, you’d wonder if Institutional Critique ever made it past the 49th parallel. The majority of major Canadian institutions remain cautious and traditional. Institutional Critique was outsourced to the artist-run centres for the most part. During the development of the Canada Council for the Arts in the 1960s, these centres were planned as utopian sites where artists could free themselves from the constraints of both museums and commercial galleries. In the beginning they were reasonably funded, and allowed for an incalculable number of new departures in many artists’ practices. But a side effect of this liberal planning was that exciting experimental and critical practices were confined to these governmentally legitimised, sideshow spaces: it was safe to make criticism, but it was also safe to ignore it. This cross-country network of artist-run centres now suffers from budget cut after budget cut, tumultuous and contested styles of governance, but ultimately it remains an active current in the dissemination of contemporary art.

With the museum remaining stagnant and the artist-run centre kept at arm’s length, the idea of collectivity becomes especially important in Canada. At the 2008 Trade Secrets conference at the Banff Centre, Barbara Fischer spoke of one of the country’s most notorious collectives, General Idea, active from the late 1960s to the early 1990s. Fisher described the collective’s practice as a Gesamtkunstwerk in which members alternately took on the roles of – among countless other things – artists, collectors, cultural conductors and publishers. She argued that the group’s true strength came from its ability to queer the notion of the museum and the art institution. This is not to say that important collectives, artist-run centres and major institutions have been mutually exclusive. What the notion of the collective offers, under these circumstances, is something more potent and responsive than what is already on offer.

Local enterprises

Pavilion Projects has been able to garner a tremendous amount of momentum by constantly repositioning the sites of its action, casting a wide net for its artists and other collaborators. Another crucial component of the group’s strategy has been to remain free of funding from the Canada Council for the Arts and the Conseil des arts et des lettres du Québec. These are two monetary lifelines that any cultural producer and institution usually relies upon, as the commercial markets and even private interest for contemporary art are slim to non-existent in Canada. Instead, the group has been pursuing small-scale collaborations with local enterprises with the aim of producing its projects. Typical of this approach has been a series of presentations for film and video works that doesn’t try to reinvent the wheel with experimental conceptual playfulness or curatorial finesse, but instead relies on the tried-and-true success of the dinner and a movie format. But not in the tradition of Gordon Matta Clark or even Rirkrit Tiravanija, where the food or its sharing is the art: in this case, the art is on the screen and the food is on your plate (and very well priced and good food at that). In collaboration with local restaurants, such as Dépaneur Le Pick-Up in Montreal’s Mile End neighborhood, Pavilion Projects has been screening moving image works over the past year to sold out houses, films by the likes of Heather and Ivan Morrison, Zin Taylor, Marina Roy, Catherine Vertige & Kosten Koper and Eve K. Tremblay.

Appetite for contemporary art

Pavilion Projects has become a first point of contact for many artists from outside Canada and even North America. This outward-looking nature for critical talent, coupled with a sense of quick receptiveness, has allowed the group to bring in, before any of the institutions, artists such as Ian Forsyth and Jane Pollard, Ulla von Brandenburg and Aurélien Froment. Equally, it has been engaged with a sense of localness, seen in the projects brought together under the umbrella title The Enterprise (2006-07). This series of events, actions and exhibitions saw Pavilion Projects take on the politics of the Montreal and Quebec art scene. The Enterprise has used local artists to perform action events, such as a black-masked one minute silence held at a forum hosted by the Conseil des arts et des lettres du Québec. It has conducted a citywide survey about the appetite for contemporary art in Montreal, which was a thinly veiled translation of a questionnaire on drug addiction. Respondents were asked to respond to statements like ‘My desire for art now seems overwhelming’ and ‘I would consider buying some art now.’ Most substantially, The Enterprise saw the transformation of the artist-run centre Articule into what appeared to be a hastily assembled political headquarters. Here Pavilion Projects hosted local meetings to assess the need for a new medium-sized contemporary art institution in the city, the idea an alternative to the proposed development of a casino in the old industrial site of Pointe-Saint-Charles.

More recently, Pavilion Projects has begun to author its own seasonal art maps for both Montreal and Toronto. It has also been organising an alternative strand of programming which runs parallel to the official programme of the Biennale Montreal – calling into question the utility and worth of the Biennale, which seems to be stumbling more and more each year. These proceedings, critically oriented yet never without a dose of humour, constantly beg the question of whether or not you should be taking them seriously. In this regard the group’s own political orientations ultimately remain elusive.

Running the risk of appearing apolitical, what comes out of Pavilion Projects’ approach is a focus on independence: an independence achieved through the group’s somewhat parasitic attempt to inhabit multiple modes of contemporary art dissemination all at once. And using instability to its advantage, in the tradition of ‘light luggage’ curating.1

1] Gillick, Liam, and Maria Lind, eds. Curating With Light Luggage. Berlin: Revolver, 2005

IMAGE CREDITS

Platforms, Terraces, Temples, Palaces, Courtyards, Stairways and Pyramids
Luis Jacob, Will Munro, Les Fermières obsédées, Dorothy Gellar, Gavin Deathfucker, Awesome, Deloro
Square Viger, Montreal Qc
October 2 2005
Courtesy of Pavilion Projects

Français

Pavilion Projects

Jesse R. McKee

Ancrée dans la scène artistique de Montréal depuis une dizaine d'années, Pavilion Projects est une organisation difficile à cerner. Collectif de commissaires, plateforme pour artistes et entreprise culturelle, elle renouvelle sans cesse sa zone d’intervention.

La première fois que j'ai entendu parler de Pavilion Project remonte à 2005. Mon colocataire devait donner un coup de main à un groupe qui participait au festival annuel de musique Pop à Montréal. Pavilion Projects avait rassemblé quelques artistes d'art contemporain et des musiciens indépendants pour l’occasion. Le projet donna lieu à un concert en plein air sur le Square Viger, un parc urbain brutaliste dans le centre-ville de Montréal. Je revois encore mon ami se déguiser dans un pur esprit de fête galante pour jouer l’un des deux batteurs aux quatre bras qui accompagnait le groupe de hard rock Awesome. Pendant ce temps, l'artiste Will Munro tirait des feux d'artifices autour du groupe sur fond de bassins et de blocs de béton.

À première vue, Pavilion Projects ressemble à un collectif de commissaires (composé de Maryse Larivière et Robin Simpson). Mais depuis leurs débuts en 2004, ils n’ont cessé de changer de formule à chaque nouveau projet. Plateforme artistique, entreprise culturelle, activistes rebelles, intellos bons vivants, leur réelle identité est aussi mystérieuse que leur lieu d’intervention : Pavilion Projects est une structure nomade.

Critique institutionnelle

Pour comprendre leur rôle au sein de la scène artistique canadienne, on ne peut faire l’impasse sur la notion de collectif. Si vous visitez un musée ou une institution d'art contemporain au Canada, vous allez rapidement constater que la critique institutionnelle n’a jamais réussi à passer la frontière. La majorité des institutions canadiennes restent plutôt conservatrices. Il semblerait qu’on ait délégué le rôle de la critique institutionnelle aux centres d'artistes autogérés. Au moment de la création du Conseil des Arts du Canada dans les années 1960, on les conçoit comme des lieux utopiques dans lesquels les artistes pourront se libérer des contraintes du musée et de la galerie commerciale. Au début, les subventions étaient relativement confortables, elles ont permis à de très nombreux artistes de démarrer leur carrière. Malheureusement, notre système libéral a eu pour cause d’inhiber ces lieux qui avaient tendance à mettre en sourdine tout ce qu’ils produisaient d’un peu trop critique ou expérimental. Puis ils se sont retrouvés avec tellement peu de moyens que la moindre revendication tombait dans l’oubli. Ce réseau national de centres d'artistes autogérés souffre actuellement d’une mauvaise gestion et de sévères coupes budgétaires qui s’aggravent chaque année. Ils restent cependant un moyen actif de diffusion de l’art contemporain.

Dans un contexte privilégiant l’apathie des musées et la paralysie des centres d'artistes autogérés, la notion de collectif a donc pris tout son sens dans ce pays. Lors de la conférence "Trade Secrets" au Banff Centre en 2008, Barbara Fischer a utilisé l’expression Gesamtkunstwerk (œuvre d’art totale) pour décrire l'un des collectifs les plus connus au Canada, General Idea. Ce collectif actif de la fin des années 1960 au début des années 1990 a réussi à endosser le rôle d'artiste, collectionneur, organisateur, éditeur, etc. On retiendra d’eux une capacité remarquable à court-circuiter le système muséal et institutionnel. Cela ne veut pas dire que les initiatives collectives importantes, artist-un spaces et grandes institutions sont tous fermés. Mais en vue de notre situation actuelle, la notion de collectif est devenue plus que jamais une tactique puissante et réactive, tout à fait cruciale.

Entreprises locales

Le nomadisme de Pavilion Projects leur a permis de mobiliser une énergie incroyable et de toucher un très grand nombre d’artistes et de personnes. Autre élément important, ils sont toujours restés autonomes vis à vis des subventions allouées par le Canada Council for the Arts et le Conseil des arts et des lettres du Québec. Ces deux institutions sont les principales sources de financement de n’importe quelle structure d’art contemporain au Canada. Quant au marché de l’art et au mécénat, ils sont quasi inexistants. Au lieu de se reposer sur les sources habituelles, ils sont allés chercher des partenariats avec de petites entreprises locales pour produire des projets à petite échelle.

Leur récente programmation de films et vidéos est l’une de leurs plus belles initiatives. Plutôt que d’inventer un énième format de projection, ils ont choisi la bonne et vieille formule du resto ciné. À la différence de Gordon Matta Clark ou de Rirkrit Tiravanija, où la nourriture et le partage de nourriture sont une œuvre en soi, Pavilion Projects a mis les œuvres sur un écran et la nourriture dans nos assiettes (excellente et très raisonnable de surcroît). En collaboration avec des restaurants locaux comme Dépaneur Le Pick-Up situé dans le quartier Mile End de Montréal, Pavilion Projects a diffusé auprès d’un très large public des vidéos d’artistes tels que Heather et Ivan Morrison, Zin Taylor, Marina Roy, Catherine Vertige & Kosten Koper et Eve K. Tremblay.

La faim de l’art contemporain

Pavilion Projects est devenu un point de repère très important pour de nombreux artistes étrangers, notamment d’Amérique du Nord. Leur grande réactivité et leur curiosité naturelle pour des talents originaux ont permis au public canadien de découvrir avant les grandes institutions des artistes comme Ian Forsyth et Jane Pollard, Ulla von Brandenburg et Aurélien Froment. Leur implication dans la vie locale est loin d’être négligeable. Le projet The Enterprise (2006-07) est une série d’événements et d’expositions qui ont révélé leur engagement politique au sein de la scène artistique montréalaise et québécoise. En collaboration avec des artistes locaux, ils ont organisé événements et performances, notamment une minute de silence, le visage masqué en noir, au Conseil des arts et des lettres du Québec. Ils ont également réalisé un sondage sur l’appétit de l’art contemporain auprès des habitants de la ville. Le questionnaire ressemblait en fait à un test de dépendance à la drogue. Les personnes interrogées devaient réagir à des phrases du genre "J’ai une envie d’art irrésistible." Ou "Je pense que je vais commencer à collectionner des œuvres". Mais The Enterprise a surtout provoqué la conversion du centre d'artiste autogéré Articule en QG politique improvisé. Des débats ont eu lieu sur la nécessité de construire dans le vieux site industriel de Pointe-Saint-Charles une institution d’art contemporain de taille moyenne à la place d’un casino.

Pavilion Projects a récemment produit une carte de l’art contemporain à Montréal et Toronto. Ils ont aussi mis en place une programmation off de la biennale de Montréal, une façon de se poser la question de l’utilité d’une biennale en perte de vitesse constante depuis quelques années. Leur esprit critique s’accompagne d’une bonne dose d’humour, on ne sait jamais quand on peut les prendre au sérieux. D’ailleurs, leur orientation politique reste un mystère.

Au risque de paraître apolitique, la grande force de Pavilion Projects reste leur indépendance et leur façon de créer des formules originales qui parasitent les modes traditionnels de diffusion et de circulation de l’art contemporain. Leur instabilité s’avère être un avantage à l’heure où l’on parle de "light luggage curating"1, une approche curatoriale privilégiant des formes souples, nomades, temporaires et pragmatiques.

1] Gillick, Liam, et Maria Lind, eds. Curating With Light Luggage. Berlin: Revolver, 2005

IMAGE CREDITS

Platforms, Terraces, Temples, Palaces, Courtyards, Stairways and Pyramids
Luis Jacob, Will Munro, Les Fermières obsédées, Dorothy Gellar, Gavin Deathfucker, Awesome, Deloro
Square Viger, Montreal Qc
October 2 2005
Courtesy of Pavilion Projects

 
advertisement advertisement advertisement