artwork image
artwork image
artwork image
artwork image
artwork image
artwork image
artwork image

English

A New Dynasty?

Isabelle Le Normand

This summer will see the opening of Dynasty in Paris, an exhibition dedicated to emerging artists in France. Organised by the Musée d’Art Moderne de la Ville de Paris and the Palais de Tokyo, this Younger Than Jesus-like event is the talk of the town and the subject of numerous artists’ fantasies. Which young artists have come to your attention over the last few months? Answer by curator Isabelle Le Normand.

Travelling around France in a Peugeot 205 restyled as a mini-printing room, creating a piece between noon and two o’clock and then showing it at ten past, starting an in situ artwork demolition company: so many examples reflect the energy of young French artists who are passionate about procedures, and the exhibition as a medium - and who are ready for action in any circumstance.

Be cautious of good ideas

Ivan Argote, Pauline Bastard and Neïl Beloufa met in 2008 in Claude Closky’s studio at the École des Beaux-Arts in Paris. Closky ‘forced us to produce’, says Beloufa. ‘It was liberating’. Argote and Bastard started to collaborate, taking from Closky his taste for self-imposed systems. They experimented with 10 Solutions (2008), a series of shows in 10 episodes, each with a new constraint: creating a work in a couple of hours and showing it immediately, showing all the art school’s students’ work in PDF format or even showing the same piece twice, displayed differently. The latest version is entitled 10 x 10 and involves ten books containing proposals of works to be done: 100 paintings, 100 sculptures, 100 drawings, 100 videos, 100 photos, 100 texts, 100 conferences, 100 portfolios and 100 shows. Pauline Bastard has continued the experiment by creating a blog where she publishes, over 150 days, a work a day – a way to run out of ideas in order to cultivate a cautiousness of ‘good ideas’.

Prolonging the exhibition

The exhibition isn't only a way to display artworks, it can become medium and process. Argote and Bastard say to be astonished by the conformism of exhibition displays. ‘No matter what the work’, Argote ruminates, ‘it almost always ends up hung the same way’. Argote and Bastard are currently planning on building a sauna in which to watch videos. ‘We needed a space that enforced a special kind of concentration’, says Argote, ‘isolated from the world, hosting a limited amount of people, where one is seated and the body is relaxed. THE SAUNA enables the viewer to feel both the length of the video and the space it is shown in.’

Adrien Vescovi, an artist close to Argote and Bastard, is also concerned with issues linked to exhibiting. His application to the residency programme Triangle in Marseille took the shape of a fake show, Some Kind of Romance, spread out on the two dimensional space of the PDF. This hypothetical story is an ironic invocation of the all-powerful data file increasingly demanded from young artists aiming to present their work. The way Vescovi shows his video works is never insignificant: whether on an iPod or a projector, it is, every time, all about ‘creating an event’, he says. Simon Nicaise, an artist also working as a curator with the Galerie Störk – an artist-run space in Rouen – also uses the exhibition as a medium. The piece Élongations (2008) is a cyma that was elongated by stretching the anchoring point, as if it were a muscle.

An empirical thought process

At the Francois Ghébaly Gallery in Los Angeles, Beloufa recently showed a chaotic installation made of boxes, greenery and wooden planks amid which was shown Kempinski, a science-fiction documentary shot in Mopti, Mali, in 2007. In the film, Malians talk through the night of their visions of the future, making up stories about a highly technological and surrealist universe; the apex of the video comes when the viewer realises that the documentary is fake. The sculptural elements of the installation accentuate the unstable and uncertain atmosphere of the movie. ‘They allow the meaning to change on every occasion’, explains Beloufa. The artist claims to be weary of the ‘cinema in the gallery, Doug Aitken style’, where the video is shown with daunting authority.

Beloufa’s empirical project of going to Mali without a script recalls Pierre Fischer and Justin Meekel’s approach, who, after the discovering the Guide de la France mystérieuse (1966) by René Alleau, decided to do a remake by travelling in a Peugeot 205 transformed into a printing room. The two artists printed and gave away their findings in a small publication called Verdure – there are eight booklets, printed between 8 July and 13 August 2009 – along a trip which was experienced almost like a rock tour: each stop brought its own innovations. Created progressively, the Verdure Tour comes from a non-authoritarian standpoint. This isn’t about having an idea and bringing everything together (materials, assistants) to realise it, but seeking to integrate chance and random meetings into the idea, in a sort of relational in situ. Their inspiration could come from Francis Alÿs, Martin Creed, Fischli & Weiss or Roman Signer, artists for whom gestures and situations are more important than the objects themselves.

Reductio ad nihilum

This generation of artists is no longer trying to impress onlookers with monumental works, rather seeking to play with procedures, to deconstruct narrative devices and, over time, to create a relationship with the viewer. If Fabien Giraud and Raphaël Siboni’s dream was to shoot a James Cameron-style blockbuster, the dream of the younger generation is much closer to the aesthetic of a Michel Gondry: limited means, DIY-like special effects and, ultimately, a methodology that allows for greater freedom towards medium and technique. Is the trend reductio ad nihilum? Simon Nicaise’s two ongoing projects (to create an artwork demolition company for institutions, and to stop creating for a year in order to think) would suggest as much.

IMAGE CREDITS

Justin Meekel, Pauline Bastard, Ivan Argote, Neil Beloufa, Pierre Fisher, Simon Nicaise, 2010
Photo: Lola Reboud

Ivan Argote, Retouche

Pauline Bastard, Sunset, Installation vidéo, projecteur, lecteur DVD, caméra, ventilateur, sac plastique, filtres, 2009.

Adrien Vescovi, couverture du dossier PDF  une certaine romance, 2009

Simon Nicaise, Elongation, 2008

Neïl Beloufa, Kempinski, vidéo, 14 minutes, 2007

Pierre Fisher et Justin Meekel, Verdure, dernier numéro d’une série de huit publiés entre le 8 Juillet et le 13 août 2009.

Français

Une nouvelle dynastie?

Isabelle Le Normand

Cet été à Paris s’ouvrira l’exposition Dynasty dédiée à la jeune création en France. Organisé par le Musée d’Art Moderne de la Ville de Paris et le Palais de Tokyo, cet événement aux allures de Younger Than Jesus alimente les conversations et fait fantasmer de nombreux artistes. Quels jeunes artistes ont retenu votre attention ces derniers mois ? Réponse d'Isabelle Le Normand, commissaire d'exposition.

Faire le tour de France en Peugeot 205 réaménagée en mini-imprimerie, imaginer une œuvre entre midi et deux pour l’exposer à 14H10, créer une agence de démolition d’œuvres in situ : autant d’exemples reflétant l’énergie de jeunes artistes passionnés par les protocoles, le médium de l’exposition et prêts à réagir à n’importe quelle situation.

Se méfier des bonnes idées

Ivan Argote, Pauline Bastard et Neïl Beloufa se rencontrent en 2008 dans l’atelier de Claude Closky à l’école des Beaux-Arts de Paris. Closky "nous forçait à produire, cela avait un effet décomplexant", raconte Beloufa. Argote et Bastard commencent à collaborer et retiennent de Closky le goût des protocoles. Ils expérimentent alors 10 solutions (2008), un projet d’exposition en dix épisodes dont le principe consiste à se fixer une contrainte différente. Produire une œuvre entre midi et deux pour l’exposer à 14H10 ; exposer tous les étudiants de l’école en présentant uniquement leurs portfolios PDF ou présenter les mêmes pièces deux fois de suite avec un accrochage différent. Le dernier opus s’intitule 10x10 et présente dix livres avec des propositions de pièces à réaliser : 100 peintures, 100 sculptures, 100 dessins, 100 performances, 100 vidéos, 100 photos, 100 textes, 100 conférences, 100 portfolios et 100 expositions. Bastard poursuit l’expérience en créant un blog où elle publie une œuvre par jour pendant 150 jours. Une manière d’épuiser les idées afin de se méfier "des bonnes idées".

Élonger l'exposition

L’exposition n’est pas qu’un simple moyen de montrer des pièces, elle devient médium et processus. Argote et Bastard s’étonnent du conformisme de la plupart des accrochages d'expositions d’art contemporain : "Qu'importe l'œuvre, elle finit toujours accrochée de la même façon", remarque Argote. Actuellement, les deux jeunes artistes travaillent à la construction d'un sauna pour regarder des vidéos. "Il nous fallait un lieu nécessitant une concentration spéciale, isolé du monde, pouvant accueillir un nombre de personnes limité, où l'on s'assoie et où le corps se délasse. LE SAUNA permet d'éprouver la durée d'une vidéo ainsi que l'espace dans lequel elle est montrée. D’une certaine façon, on fait corps avec la vidéo."

Adrien Vescovi, artiste proche d’Argote et Bastard, s’intéresse également à la question de l’exposition. Son dossier de candidature au programme de résidence de Triangle à Marseille, se présente sous la forme d’une exposition fictive intitulée Une certaine romance. Elle se déploie dans l’espace en deux dimensions du dossier PDF. Cette hypothèse d’histoire est un contre-pied à la toute puissance du "PDF", outil de plus en plus demandé aux jeunes artistes pour présenter leur travail. La façon de montrer ses vidéos n’est jamais non plus anodine : que ce soit sur un ipod ou avec un projectionniste, il s’agit à chaque fois de "créer l’événement" précise l’artiste. Simon Nicaise, artiste très actif dans le champ curatorial avec la galerie Störk, un artist-run space situé à Rouen, utilise aussi le médium de l'exposition. Élongation (2008) est une cimaise ayant subi une élongation provoquée par l'étirement excessif d’un point d’ancrage, comme le muscle d’un corps.

Une démarche empirique

Récemment exposé à la galerie François Ghébaly à Los Angeles, Beloufa a créé une installation chaotique faite de caissons, plantes vertes et planches de bois pour Kempinski, documentaire de science-fiction tourné à Mopti au Mali en 2007. Des Maliens racontent pendant la nuit leur vision du futur en inventant des histoires sur un environnement hautement technologique et surréaliste. Le climax de la vidéo est le moment où le spectateur se rend compte qu’il s’agit d’un faux documentaire. Les éléments sculpturaux de l’installation renforcent l'atmosphère instable et incertaine du film. "Ils permettent au sens de muter à la moindre occasion", explique Beloufa. L'artiste dit également se méfier du côté "cinéma en galerie façon Doug Aitken" où la vidéo est montrée avec autorité.

La démarche empirique de Beloufa qui part au Mali sans scénario rejoint celle de Pierre Fisher et Justin Meekel qui décident de faire un remake du Guide de la France mystérieuse (1966) de René Alleau en partant sur les routes à bord d’une Peugeot 205 transformée en mini-imprimerie. Les deux artistes éditent et distribuent leurs trouvailles sous forme d’une petite publication intitulée Verdure (huit livrets édités du 8 juillet au 13 août 2009) tout au long du voyage qui s’apparenterait presque à une ‘tournée rock’ : il faut inventer chaque étape. Ils ajoutent au protocole le fait de dépenser le moins d’argent possible. Réalisé au fil du temps, le Verdure tour relève d’une posture non autoritaire. Il ne s’agit pas d’avoir une idée et de tout mettre en place (achat de matériaux, assistants) pour la réaliser mais de chercher à intégrer le hasard et la rencontre. Du in situ relationnel en quelque sorte. Leurs modèles seraient à chercher du côté de Francis Alÿs, Martin Creed, Fischli & Weiss ou Roman Signer, des artistes pour lesquels les gestes et la création de situations sont plus importants que les objets eux-mêmes.

Posture de décroissance

Cette génération d'artistes ne cherche pas à épater la galerie avec de grandes œuvres monumentales mais cherche plutôt à jouer avec des protocoles, à déconstruire des dispositifs de narration et instaurer une relation avec le spectateur en plusieurs temps. Si le rêve de Fabien Giraud et de Raphaël Siboni serait de réaliser un blockbuster à la James Cameron, celui de cette nouvelle génération est bien plus proche de Michel Gondry : économie réduite, effets spéciaux bricolés et au final, une méthodologie permettant une grande liberté vis-à-vis du médium et de la technique. Serait-ce une posture de décroissance ? Les deux projets en cours de Simon Nicaise (créer une entreprise de démolition d’œuvres in situ à l’attention des institutions et arrêter de créer pendant un an pour réfléchir) confirment cette tendance.

IMAGE CREDITS

Justin Meekel, Pauline Bastard, Ivan Argote, Neil Beloufa, Pierre Fisher, Simon Nicaise, 2010
Photo: Lola Reboud

Ivan Argote, Retouche

Pauline Bastard, Sunset, Installation vidéo, projecteur, lecteur DVD, caméra, ventilateur, sac plastique, filtres, 2009.

Adrien Vescovi, couverture du dossier PDF  une certaine romance, 2009

Simon Nicaise, Elongation, 2008

Neïl Beloufa, Kempinski, vidéo, 14 minutes, 2007

Pierre Fisher et Justin Meekel, Verdure, dernier numéro d’une série de huit publiés entre le 8 Juillet et le 13 août 2009.

 
advertisement advertisement advertisement