artwork image
artwork image
artwork image
artwork image
artwork image
artwork image
artwork image
artwork image
artwork image

English

Gargantuesque Mellors

Colin Perry

Nathaniel Mellors describes his forthcoming feature-film length production as ‘British Sitcom meets Pasolini’. Colin Perry sketches an introduction to Mellors’ ribald, satirical approach to filmmaking and sculpture.

How best to describe Nathaniel Mellors’ work? Perhaps I should start by noting his interest in the darker forces of our culture. There’s the recurrent themes of cannibalism and coprophagia (human- and shit-eating as cultural engorgement), the conceit of the author as a dictator, the confluence between the avant-garde manifesto and mainstream newscasting, and the subversive potential of parody and satire. It might also be useful to mention some of Mellors’ reference points: François Rabelais’ Gargantua and Pantagruel (1532-64), British television comedy such as Monty Python’s Flying Circus (broadcasted between 1969-1974) and epic US dramas such as The Sopranos, Industrial music by bands such as Throbbing Gristle and Nurse With Wound, the writing of Georges Bataille and the Marquis de Sade, Pasolini’s film Salò, or the 120 Days of Sodom (1975), Chris Marker’s La Jetée (1962) and, less obviously, John Boorman’s psychedelic b-movie epic Zardoz (1974).

Born Again

Now we must look into the bowels of the matter: the work itself. In the video installation Giantbum (2008), which was exhibited in 2009 at the Tate Triennial in London, and then at the Stedelijk Museum in Amsterdam and Lombard-Freid Projects in New York, we encounter a nightmarish situation. It is the year 1213, and a band of explorers find themselves trapped within the fetid organs of a giant’s body. The group’s deranged leader, The Father, makes a lone journey through the giant’s entrails, looking for a way out. When he returns, he is transformed, ‘born-again’. Having survived by literally eating himself – shitting himself out and rebuilding himself out of his own shit, then eating himself again – he conceives of his existence as an eternal feedback loop. Overcome with messianic zeal, he claims that the group is actually inside the very bowels of God. An improbable millenarian cult leader, he seeks to lead his followers to ‘salvation’ through self-sacrificial absorption into the giant’s (or God’s) guts. It is, Mellors has noted, a plot that moves from the ‘scatological to the eschatological’.

When I spoke with Mellors, he was scripting a rather more ambitious work. Provisionally titled Ourhouse, the piece will take the form of six episodes within a feature-film length production, which he describes as ‘British sitcom meets Pasolini’s Theorem’. In Pasolini’s 1968 film, an enigmatic young man turns up at the house of a bourgeois family and proceeds to seduce the husband, the wife, their daughter, son, and the maid. In Mellors’ take, things are initially more problematic (and of our times): the manipulative ‘Daddy’ figure’s young third wife resents him, and he suspects that the local council is infringing on his ‘sovereignty’; he is, says Mellors, from the ‘Tony Blair generation, who realises that he’s not a radical artist and that he’s actually a force of bureaucratic administration’. Another character called ‘Object’ takes to eating books, the content of which is played out by the other characters within the drama.

Controlling the ‘Modern Age’

Recently, Mellors’ interest in television has led to a direct intervention in mainstream broadcast media. In the summer of 2009 the BBC commissioned him to make a short ‘work of modern art’ to introduce the final episode of the series The Seven Ages of Britain, which was written and presented by the great patrician of British television, David Dimbleby, and which traced the history of Britain's art and artefacts over the past 2000 years. Mellors’ 3-minute video The 7 Ages of Britain Teaser (2010), opens with a scene from an improbably low-budget Olympus (a smoke machine and stage set hastily erected in a field) inhabited by a gold lamé-clad female (‘The Operator’) and a club-wielding barbarian (‘Kadmus’). The Operator believes she can control what she calls ‘the Modern Age’ with the aid of an animatronic mask of Dimbleby’s face, which is propped precariously atop a nearby pedestal. Kadmus clumsily knocks the prosthetic visage from its plinth, sending it plummeting through the clouds, down towards present day London. The real Dimbleby picks up his prosthetic double, and the Seven Ages of Britain begins in earnest.

Found in translation

Mellors’ most recent work accentuates the problematic of finding a voice within an overbearing cultural melee. The idea that one might find one’s own voice through digesting others’ is surely related to the question of translation, of finding one’s own voice in an alien language, of making it one’s own. As Catalogue has much to do with the issues at stake in the translating process, it seems only right to finish with a quote from Sir Thomas Urquhart’s magnificent seventeenth century translation of Gargantua, which adds to and expands considerably upon the original French (without forfeiting its spirit). The passage concerns a philosopher who retreats to the country in order to work in peace and quiet, only to be harassed by nature’s variegated noises. Rabelais’ original is the terse, forty-seven word

‘toutesfois autour de luy abayent les chiens, ullent les loups, rugient les lions, hannissent les chevaulx, barrient les elephans, sifflent les serpens, braislent les asnes, sonnent les cigales, lamentent les tourterelles; c’est à dire, plus estoit troublé que s’il fust à la foyre de Fontenay ou Niort’.

Urquhart’s ‘translation’, by contrast, is a two-hundred-and-forty-two-word wall of adjectives:

‘…surrounding and environ’d about to with the barking of Currs, bawling of Mastiffs, bleating of Sheep, prating of Parrots, tattling of Jackdaws, grunting of Swine, girning of Boars, yelping of Foxes, mewing of Cats, cheeping of Mice, squeaking of Weasils, croaking of Frogs, crowing of Cocks, kekling of Hens, calling of Partridges, chanting of swans, chattering of Jays, peeping of Chickens, singing of Larks, creaking of Geese, chirping of Swallows, clucking of Moorfowls, bumbling of Bees, rammage of Hawks, chirming of Linets, croaking of Ravens, screeching of owls, wicking of Pigs, gushing of Hogs, curring of Pigeons, grumbling of Cushet-doves, howling of Panthers, curkling of Quails, chirping of Sparrows, crackling of Crows, nuzzing of Camels, wheening of Whelps, buzzing of Dromedaries, mumbling of Rabets, cricking of Ferrets, humming of Wasps, moiling of Tygers, bruzzing of Bears, sussing of Kitnings, clamring of Scarfes, whimpering of Fulmarts, boing of Buffalos, warbling of Nightingales, quavering of Meavises, drintling of Turkies, coniating of Storks, frantling of Peacockes, clattering of Magpies, murmering of Stock-doves, crouting of Cormorants, cigling of Locusts, charming of Beagles, guarring of Puppies, snarling of Messens, rantling of Rats, guerieting of Apes, snuttering of Monkies, pioling of Pelicans, quacking of Ducks, yelling of Wolves, roaring of Lions, neighing of Horses, crying of Elephants, hissing of Serpents, and wailing of Turtles; that he was much more troubled, than if he had been in the middle of the Crowd at the Fair of Fontenay of Niort’.

Translation, like eating and digesting, can be a generative process. Mellors’ work explores cultural expression as a series of beginningless avenues: a set of points whose purpose is not so much in their origin than in their capacity for infinite renewal.

To watch Nathaniel Mellors’ The 7 Ages of Britain Teaser (2010) on Vimeo CLICK HERE.

IMAGE CREDITS

Nathaniel Mellors, The 7 Ages of Britain Teaser, 2010 (video still)
Images courtesy of the artist; Matt's Gallery, London; MONITOR, Rome & Lombard-Freid Projects, New York

Nathaniel Mellors, The 7 Ages of Britain Teaser, 2010 (video still)
Images courtesy of the artist; Matt's Gallery, London; MONITOR, Rome & Lombard-Freid Projects, New York

Nathaniel Mellors, The 7 Ages of Britain Teaser, 2010 (video still)
Images courtesy of the artist; Matt's Gallery, London; MONITOR, Rome & Lombard-Freid Projects, New York

Nathaniel Mellors, The 7 Ages of Britain Teaser, 2010 (video still)
Images courtesy of the artist; Matt's Gallery, London; MONITOR, Rome & Lombard-Freid Projects, New York

Nathaniel Mellors, The 7 Ages of Britain Teaser, 2010 (video still)
Images courtesy of the artist; Matt's Gallery, London; MONITOR, Rome & Lombard-Freid Projects, New York

Nathaniel Mellors, The 7 Ages of Britain Teaser, 2010 (video still)
Images courtesy of the artist; Matt's Gallery, London; MONITOR, Rome & Lombard-Freid Projects, New York

Nathaniel Mellors, Giantbum, 2008 (video still)
Images courtesy of the artist; Matt's Gallery, London; MONITOR, Rome & Lombard-Freid Projects, New York

Nathaniel Mellors, Giantbum, 2008 (video still)
Images courtesy of the artist; Matt's Gallery, London; MONITOR, Rome & Lombard-Freid Projects, New York

Nathaniel Mellors, Giantbum, 2008 (installation view, Tate Britain)
Images courtesy of the artist; Matt's Gallery, London; MONITOR, Rome & Lombard-Freid Projects, New York

Français

Gargantuesque Mellors

Colin Perry

Nathaniel Mellors décrit son prochain long métrage comme "un sitcom anglais à la sauce Pasolini". Colin Perry esquisse un portrait de l'artiste et de son approche grivoise et satirique du film et de la sculpture.

Si je devais décrire le travail de Nathaniel Mellors, je commencerais d'abord par parler de sa fascination pour les forces du mal. Parmi les thèmes récurrents de son travail : le cannibalisme et la scatophagie (la consommation de merde comme indigestion culturelle), la dictature de l'auteur prétentieux, les rapports entre manifeste d'avant-garde et flash info populaire et, enfin, le potentiel subversif de la parodie et de la satire. Rappelons par la même occasion quelques références essentielles de l'artiste : Gargantua et Pantagruel (1532-64) de François Rabelais, les séries télé du genre Monty Python's Flying Circus (diffusé entre 1969-1974) et Les Sopranos, la musique industrielle des groupes Throbbing Gristle et Nurse With Wound, les écrits de Georges Bataille et du Marquis de Sade, les films Salò ou les 120 Journées de Sodome (1975) de Pier Paolo Pasolini, La Jetée (1962) de Chris Marker, et une référence moins évidente, Zardoz (1974), film de série B psychédélique et épique de John Boorman...

Du scatologique vers l'eschatologique

Mais rentrons sans plus attendre dans les entrailles du sujet : son œuvre. Exposée en 2009 à la Tate Triennial de Londres, au Stedelijk Museum d'Amsterdam et au Lombard-Freid Projects à New York, l'installation vidéo Giantbum (2008) met en scène une situation cauchemardesque. Nous sommes en 1213, un groupe d'explorateurs se retrouve coincé dans les organes fétides du corps d'un géant. À moitié-fou, le chef de la bande dit Le Père entame un long périple dans les entrailles du géant à la recherche de la sortie. À son retour, il est n'est plus le même homme, on dirait qu'il est ressuscité. Il a survécu en se nourrissant littéralement de son corps, en mangeant sa propre merde pour se régénérer et continuer à se nourrir à nouveau de ses excréments : une existence envisagée comme un cycle, un eternel renouvellement. Plein de zèle, l'homme se prend alors pour le Messie et proclame que le groupe est en fait à l'intérieur des entrailles de Dieu. Tel un improbable chef de culte millénariste, il veut guider ses compagnons vers le "Salut" en les poussant au sacrifice pour finir engloutis dans les intestins du géant (ou de Dieu). L'intrigue se déplace, comme le remarque Mellors, du "scatologique vers l'eschatologique."

Au cours d'une conversation avec Mellors, il me raconte un scénario bien plus ambitieux. Provisoirement intitulée Ourhouse, l'œuvre prendra la forme d'un long métrage en six parties qu'il décrit comme "un sitcom anglais à la rencontre de Théorème de Pasolini". Dans ce film, un jeune homme étrange s'installe chez une famille bourgeoise et commence à séduire le mari, la femme, leur fille, leur fils et la servante. Pour Mellors, l'intrigue est beaucoup plus complexe et contemporaine qu'il n'y paraît : la jeune et troisième femme du personnage manipulateur qu'est le "Père" le déteste, tandis que celui-ci soupçonne les autorités locales de vouloir renverser sa "souveraineté". Mellors le décrit comme un homme de la "génération de Tony Blair qui se rend compte qu'il n'est pas un artiste mais un puissant bureaucrate au service de l'administration." Un autre personnage nommé "Objet" se met à manger des livres dont le contenu est interprété par les autres personnages de la pièce.

Le contrôle de l'Âge Moderne

L'interêt de Mellors pour la télévision lui a récemment donné l'occasion d'intervenir sur une chaîne de grande audience. En 2009, la BBC lui commande la réalisation d'une courte "œuvre d'art moderne" afin d'annoncer le dernier épisode de la série The Seven Ages of Britain, écrit et présenté par un grand homme de la télévision britannique, David Dimbleby. La série retrace l'histoire de l'art et de la production humaine depuis 2000 ans. Mellors réalise The 7 Ages of Britain Teaser (2010), un petit clip vidéo de 3 minutes qui commence par une scène dans l'Olympe avec "L'Opératrice", un personnage féminin vêtue d'or, et le barbare "Kadmus", sa massue à la main. Le décor cheap et petit budget semble avoir été monté en urgence dans un champ avec une machine à fumée. "L'Opératrice" pense qu'elle peut contrôler "l'Âge Moderne" à l'aide d'un masque animatronique du visage de Dimbleby, posé de façon bancale sur un socle. Kadmus fait maladroitement tomber la prothèse faciale qui plonge tout droit à travers les nuages vers le Londres d'aujourd'hui. Le vrai Dimbleby ramasse la prothèse de son visage et Seven Ages of Britain démarre, pour de bon...

Traduire sans trahir

Dernièrement, le travail de Mellors a pris la forme d'une quête tout à fait singulière : retrouver notre voix perdue dans la masse culturelle dominante. Trouver sa voix en digérant celle des autres est une idée très proche de la traduction dont le processus implique de trouver sa propre voix dans une langue étrangère. Puisque nous sommes dans le contexte de la revue Catalogue, elle aussi très liée aux questions de traduction, il semblerait tout à fait opportun de conclure par cette citation extraite de la superbe traduction de Gargantua réalisée par Sir Thomas Urquhart au XVIIe siècle qui développe considérablement la version orignale française (sans perdre son esprit). Le passage correspond au moment où le philosophe se retire à la campagne pour travailler en paix mais se retrouve tourmenté par les bruits de la nature. Le texte original de Rabelais est plutôt bref, 47 mots au total :

‘toutesfois autour de luy abayent les chiens, ullent les loups, rugient les lions, hannissent les chevaulx, barrient les elephans, sifflent les serpens, braislent les asnes, sonnent les cigales, lamentent les tourterelles; c’est à dire, plus estoit troublé que s’il fust à la foyre de Fontenay ou Niort.’

La traduction d'Urquhart, au contraire, fait défiler une cascade d'adjectifs de 242 mots :

‘…surrounding and environ’d about to with the barking of Currs, bawling of Mastiffs, bleating of Sheep, prating of Parrots, tattling of Jackdaws, grunting of Swine, girning of Boars, yelping of Foxes, mewing of Cats, cheeping of Mice, squeaking of Weasils, croaking of Frogs, crowing of Cocks, kekling of Hens, calling of Partridges, chanting of swans, chattering of Jays, peeping of Chickens, singing of Larks, creaking of Geese, chirping of Swallows, clucking of Moorfowls, bumbling of Bees, rammage of Hawks, chirming of Linets, croaking of Ravens, screeching of owls, wicking of Pigs, gushing of Hogs, curring of Pigeons, grumbling of Cushet-doves, howling of Panthers, curkling of Quails, chirping of Sparrows, crackling of Crows, nuzzing of Camels, wheening of Whelps, buzzing of Dromedaries, mumbling of Rabets, cricking of Ferrets, humming of Wasps, moiling of Tygers, bruzzing of Bears, sussing of Kitnings, clamring of Scarfes, whimpering of Fulmarts, boing of Buffalos, warbling of Nightingales, quavering of Meavises, drintling of Turkies, coniating of Storks, frantling of Peacockes, clattering of Magpies, murmering of Stock-doves, crouting of Cormorants, cigling of Locusts, charming of Beagles, guarring of Puppies, snarling of Messens, rantling of Rats, guerieting of Apes, snuttering of Monkies, pioling of Pelicans, quacking of Ducks, yelling of Wolves, roaring of Lions, neighing of Horses, crying of Elephants, hissing of Serpents, and wailing of Turtles; that he was much more troubled, than if he had been in the middle of the Crowd at the Fair of Fontenay of Niort.’

Traduire, comme manger et digérer, sont des activités génératrices. Le travail de Mellors explore la culture comme l'expression d'une série d'avenues sans début ni fin, un ensemble de points dont le sens premier n'est pas tant leur origine que leur capacité de se renouveler à l'infini.

Pour regarder The 7 Ages of Britain Teaser (2010) de Nathaniel Mellors sur Vimeo, CLIQUEZ ICI.

IMAGE CREDITS

Nathaniel Mellors, The 7 Ages of Britain Teaser, 2010 (video still)
Images courtesy of the artist; Matt's Gallery, London; MONITOR, Rome & Lombard-Freid Projects, New York

Nathaniel Mellors, The 7 Ages of Britain Teaser, 2010 (video still)
Images courtesy of the artist; Matt's Gallery, London; MONITOR, Rome & Lombard-Freid Projects, New York

Nathaniel Mellors, The 7 Ages of Britain Teaser, 2010 (video still)
Images courtesy of the artist; Matt's Gallery, London; MONITOR, Rome & Lombard-Freid Projects, New York

Nathaniel Mellors, The 7 Ages of Britain Teaser, 2010 (video still)
Images courtesy of the artist; Matt's Gallery, London; MONITOR, Rome & Lombard-Freid Projects, New York

Nathaniel Mellors, The 7 Ages of Britain Teaser, 2010 (video still)
Images courtesy of the artist; Matt's Gallery, London; MONITOR, Rome & Lombard-Freid Projects, New York

Nathaniel Mellors, The 7 Ages of Britain Teaser, 2010 (video still)
Images courtesy of the artist; Matt's Gallery, London; MONITOR, Rome & Lombard-Freid Projects, New York

Nathaniel Mellors, Giantbum, 2008 (video still)
Images courtesy of the artist; Matt's Gallery, London; MONITOR, Rome & Lombard-Freid Projects, New York

Nathaniel Mellors, Giantbum, 2008 (video still)
Images courtesy of the artist; Matt's Gallery, London; MONITOR, Rome & Lombard-Freid Projects, New York

Nathaniel Mellors, Giantbum, 2008 (installation view, Tate Britain)
Images courtesy of the artist; Matt's Gallery, London; MONITOR, Rome & Lombard-Freid Projects, New York

 
advertisement advertisement advertisement