artwork image
artwork image
artwork image
artwork image
artwork image
artwork image
artwork image

English

Loïc Raguénès

Elisabeth Wetterwald

Pictures reduced to dots and carefully coloured – Loïc Raguénès exposes a world we had almost forgotten.

Loïc Raguénès may have started by making screen prints on aluminium, but he quickly changed his mind and decided instead to use a much more archaic, but also much lighter and temporal technique: colour pencils. As a result, his practice is completely atypical, miles away from anything done by other artists of his generation, those born around 1970. Raguénès’ work is gracefully confident in its own anachronism. The technique is simple and the artist sticks to it. He selects pictures in magazines, on the internet or on databanks, when they are not simple amateur photographs. These images are, in his own words, ‘slightly doctored’ to leave only a dot-like composition and variations of light. Each picture is then printed, laid on a light table, and meticulously reproduced with colour pencils on a special piece of paper by what he calls the ‘little hands’. The process is laborious, precise and patient; it seems invariable.

A quick glance at this body of work may make you think that Raguénès is interested in, or denounces, excessive mediatisation, the overbearing presence of images in our daily life, the lack of choice, the uniformity of imagination – a form of dictatorship. The artist taps most iconographic registers (wildlife, sport, and ethnological documentaries, films and cartoons, landscapes, advertisements, reproductions of old master paintings, female nudes, politicians, etc) and paradoxically ‘adds’ to the images by draining them of their singularity. He reduces the pictures to a bare minimum and leaves them almost undecipherable, denying them their informative or documentary potential. Yet this vision would imply a kind of naivety and contradict the artist’s serene indifference as well as his distance from these societal matters.

A few whirling dervishes and a dachshund

In many respects, Raguénès is an artist who ‘comes after’, and he’s well aware of it. He has, of course, heard of Seurat’s divisionism, of Lichtenstein’s use of Benday dots, of the High & Low, of various appropriationisms, of Baudrillard, of Virilio and other virtual headhunters. The artist is fully in command of this culture but doesn’t really care. He doesn’t wish to inscribe himself in such a tradition; he has nothing to claim, has no real stylistic affinities with other artists and is autonomous, happy to do his own thing. Hence his indifference to debates on appropriation, the digital age, authorship, quotation … Hence, also, his refusal to talk about his practice in conceptual terms, referring instead to ‘affect’ when one is trying to understand the criteria that lead him to pick an image rather than another. It is difficult to establish a classification looking at a close-up of a banana, a flock of wild geese, a series of whirling dervishes (green, blue, red …), a yellow linden tree with leaves next to a yellow linden tree without leaves, a red amanita, a series of purple octopuses, pictures from François Truffaut’s movies, aquatic dance scenes (purple, blue, green, yellow, orange, red …), Oscar Niemeyer’s architecture, the green portrait of Christiane F. (prostitute and drug-addict), a red policeman riding a horse, a sunset. Yet, some semaphores are providing us with signs to decipher in this apparent mayhem.

One has to bear in mind that if such-and-such an image triggers for me such-and-such an association, it’s very likely that it doesn’t for someone else, and vice versa. I have therefore to be careful, and from now on I’ll speak only for myself. The world Raguénès depicts is, to me, immediately familiar. It is familiar first and foremost because of its Frenchness (i.e., the culture the artist’s work draws upon is the one available in France). It’s also familiar because of its focus on the past. There’s nothing I don’t know in these pictures; most of his images refer to ‘things’ anyone born in the early-70s has come cross at least once. These TV programs, films, books, styles, formats, icons, animals seen at the cinema or in zoos (and these very amalgams) are part of an ‘average’ culture, a trivial world which doesn’t really call for attention or specific knowledge but which is part of me, whether I like it or not. Most of this occupies a rarely visited place in my memory, but when I see an exhibition of Raguénès’ work, all of a sudden everything comes back, it catches up with me, literally shouts at me. If the artist talks about affect, there must be addressees, and the viewer can understand these pictures just like this: finding himself or herself in a familiar situation, one that has to do with intimacy, memory and introspection (renewing with a sort of Barthesian it-was, but one desecrated and democratised).

Silver seal and white monochrome

Raguénès may be melancholic but he isn’t soppy, and his refined humour, infused with poetry and irony, takes his work beyond the simple sharing of memories. Otherwise, he wouldn’t stubbornly continue to picture with his colour pencils – but also in paintings and screen prints1 – an ordinary dachshund, looking stupid like most creatures of its kind. He wouldn’t work in series either, obsessively coming back to the same pattern (see for example, the little purple octopus pictured in at least six different positions), or repeating it in different colours. He wouldn’t work on his exhibitions’ hang with such maestria, as he did last year at the Musée des Beaux-Arts de Dole,2 parsimoniously placing his pictures on walls (coloured or not) whose uniformity was interrupted here and there by large monochrome canvases – Raguénès set up a game of resonances between colours (stark contrast and subtle variation), between formats, the full and the empty, different rhythms. Lastly, the artist wouldn’t be able to build from this out-of-date past, from these collections of faded icons and obsolete clichés, such an unsettling (and vibrant) world, whose discretely made-up inhabitants don’t attempt to catch our attention but prefer instead the indeterminate boundaries of immateriality and disappearance – while remaining inescapably present.

1] As demonstrated by Raguénès’ exhibition Teckel & Cie and Wallpapers by Artists, Galerie de multiples, Paris, 5 June – 3 July 2010.

2] Visitez le Jura, Musée des Beaux-Arts, Dole, 19 June - 20 September 2009.

IMAGE CREDITS

Loïc Raguénès, Les fleurs, 2005 Crayon de couleur, papier 19,0 x 28,0 cm

Loïc Raguénès, Une anglaise, 2009 Mur peint, dessin. Musée des Beaux-Arts, Dole

Loïc Raguénès, Cochons bleus, 2009 Crayon de couleur, papier 35,0 x 45,0 cm

Loïc Raguénès, Métro Cité, 2010 Peinture murale Le Spot, Le Havre

Loïc Raguénès, Les roseaux, 2009 Crayon de couleur, papier 35,0 x 51,0 cm (collection Anne Dary)

Loïc Raguénès, Derviches tourneurs, 2005 Crayon de couleur, papier 26,0 x 36,0 cm (chacun) La Synagogue de Delme, Delme

Loïc Raguénès, Moi, Christiane F, 2009 Crayon de couleur, papier, 31,0 x 25,0 cm (collection Cécile Bart)

Français

Loïc Raguénès

Elisabeth Wetterwald

Images tramées et savamment colorées. Loïc Raguénès fait vibrer un monde qu’on avait presque oublié.

Si Loïc Raguénès a commencé à réaliser des tableaux en sérigraphie sur aluminium, il s’est rapidement ravisé, préférant user d’une technique nettement plus archaïque, mais aussi plus légère et temporelle – le crayon de couleur. Son œuvre est de fait absolument atypique, ne ressemble à rien de ce qui se pratique chez les artistes de sa génération (nés aux alentours de 1970) et assume avec autant de grâce que d’aplomb son singulier anachronisme. La technique est simple et l’artiste n’y déroge pas. Il choisit des images dans des magazines, sur l'Internet, sur des banques de données, quand ce ne sont pas de banales photos d’amateurs. Celles-ci sont ensuite "un peu bricolées", selon ses termes, pour que n’en subsiste que la trame (des points) et les variations de la lumière. Chacune est ensuite imprimée, posée sur une table lumineuse puis fidèlement et minutieusement reproduite par des "petites mains" (toujours selon ses termes), sur un papier choisi, au moyen de crayons d’une seule couleur. Le travail est laborieux, précis, patient et semble invariant.

Un regard rapide sur l’œuvre pourrait laisser croire que Raguénès s’intéresse à – voire dénonce – la médiatisation à outrance, l’invasion des images dans notre quotidien, l’absence de choix, l’uniformité des imaginaires, la dictature, enfin. Car il est vrai que, puisant ses ressources dans tous les registres iconographiques (documentaires animaliers, sportifs ou ethnologiques, photogrammes de films et de dessins animés, paysages, publicités, reproductions de toiles de maîtres, nus féminins, hommes politiques, etc.), il en "rajoute" (de manière paradoxale) en soustrayant à ces images tout ce qui pouvait leur rester de singularité, les passant à la trame comme on passe le linge à la machine, les laissant pour finir dans un état de lisibilité pour le moins ténu ; leur déniant toute velléité documentaire ou informative. Mais cette vision des choses supposerait, on s’en doute, une certaine dose de naïveté et occulterait l’indifférence et le recul – aussi immenses que sereins – de l’artiste par rapport à ces affaires sociétales.

Quelques derviches et un teckel

Raguénès est un artiste qui vient "après", selon bien des points de vue et en toute connaissance de cause. Il a évidemment eu vent du divisionnisme d’un Seurat, de l’utilisation du point Benday par Lichtenstein, des aventures du High & Low, des divers appropriationnismes, des Baudrillard, Virilio et autres chasseurs de têtes virtuelles. Il possède cette culture mais en même temps ce n’est pas son affaire. Car il ne s’inscrit pas, n’a rien à revendiquer, n’a pas d’affinités stylistiques avec d’autres artistes et trace son chemin en toute autonomie. D’où cette indifférence aux débats sur l’appropriation des images, sur l’ère numérique, les droits d’auteurs, la citation… D’où encore, son refus de parler de son travail de manière conceptuelle, évoquant volontiers l’affect lorsqu’on essaie de savoir quels sont les critères qui l’amènent à traiter telle image plutôt que telle autre. S’il est en effet difficile d’établir une classification à partir d’un gros plan sur une banane, un vol d’oies sauvages, une série de derviches tourneurs (verts, bleus, rouges...), un tilleul jaune avec feuilles placé à côté d’un tilleul jaune sans feuilles, une amanite rouge, une série de pieuvres mauves, des photogrammes issus de films de François Truffaut, des scènes de danse aquatique (violettes, bleues, vertes, jaunes, oranges, rouges…), l’architecture d'Oscar Niemeyer, le portrait vert de Christiane F. (droguée, prostituée), un gendarme à cheval (rouge), un coucher de soleil, on peut néanmoins trouver quelques sémaphores qui nous font signe dans ce monde apparemment chaotique…

Tout en gardant à l’esprit que si telle image me fait signe, il est probable qu’elle n’en fasse pas à quelqu’un d’autre, ou inversement. Je resterai donc prudente sur cette voie et ne parlerai qu’en mon nom. Le sentiment immédiat que je ressens, c’est que cet univers m’est familier. Sans doute, d’abord, en raison de son caractère "globalement français" (disons que la culture qui y est représentée est celle à laquelle on a accès en France). D’autre part à cause de son côté "passé", justement. Je ne découvre rien là que je ne connaisse, d’autant que ce passé est assez précisément datable : la plupart des images renvoient à des "choses" que toute personne née aux alentours de 1970 a nécessairement rencontrées au cours de son existence. Cette culture télévisuelle, ces films, ces livres, ces styles, ces formats, ces icônes, ces animaux vus au cinéma ou au zoo (ces amalgames, précisément), toute cette culture "moyenne", ce "monde mineur" qui ne nécessite pas plus d’attention particulière que de connaissance spécifique, font partie de mon histoire, que je le veuille ou non. Alors que j’avais pu reléguer ça dans un coin peu fréquenté de ma mémoire, je visite une exposition de Raguénès et soudain, tout cela revient en masse, me rattrape, s’impose à moi, littéralement m’interpelle. Si l’artiste parle d’affect, il existe nécessairement des destinataires, et le spectateur peut lui aussi appréhender ces tableaux sur ce mode, se retrouvant dans une situation familière, de l’ordre de l’intime, de la réminiscence et du retour sur soi. (Retrouvant une sorte de "ça a été" barthésien, mais désacralisé et démocratisé).

Phoque argenté et monochrome blanc

Mais Raguénès n’a rien d’un ange relationnel ; s’il peut être mélancolique, il n’est pas mièvre, et son humour cultivé, empreint de poésie et d’ironie, emmène son œuvre au-delà du simple partage de souvenirs. Si tel n’était pas le cas, il ne s’obstinerait pas depuis des années à reproduire au crayon de couleur – mais aussi en peinture et en sérigraphie1 – un vulgaire teckel représenté de profil (droit ou gauche), l’air idiot, comme la plupart des bestioles de cette espèce. Il ne travaillerait pas non plus en série, revenant sur le même motif de manière obsessionnelle (voir la petite pieuvre mauve représentée dans au moins six positions différentes) ou le déclinant en plusieurs teintes. Il ne fignolerait pas ses accrochages avec maestria, comme il a pu le faire l’année dernière au Musée des Beaux-Arts de Dole2 , plaçant ses tableaux avec parcimonie sur des murs (colorés ou non) dont l’uniformité se voit trouée ici et là par de grands monochromes sur toiles – jeux de résonances (contrastes ou tons sur tons) entre les couleurs, les formats, mais aussi aménagements de pleins et de vides, variation des rythmes. Enfin, il ne parviendrait pas à construire à partir de ce passé périmé, de cette collection d'icônes usées et de clichés désuets, un monde troublant (vibrant) dont les habitants, discrètement fardés, ne nous font pas de l’œil, préférant se tenir sur les frontières incertaines de l’effacement et de l’immatériel – tout en restant irréductiblement présents.

1] En témoigne l’exposition Teckel & Cie de Loïc Raguénès et Wallpapers by Artists, Galerie de multiples, Paris, 5 juin - 3 juillet 2010.

2] Visitez le Jura, Musée des Beaux-Arts, Dole, 19 juin - 20 septembre 2009.

IMAGE CREDITS

Loïc Raguénès, Les fleurs, 2005 Crayon de couleur, papier 19,0 x 28,0 cm

Loïc Raguénès, Une anglaise, 2009 Mur peint, dessin. Musée des Beaux-Arts, Dole

Loïc Raguénès, Cochons bleus, 2009 Crayon de couleur, papier 35,0 x 45,0 cm

Loïc Raguénès, Métro Cité, 2010 Peinture murale Le Spot, Le Havre

Loïc Raguénès, Les roseaux, 2009 Crayon de couleur, papier 35,0 x 51,0 cm (collection Anne Dary)

Loïc Raguénès, Derviches tourneurs, 2005 Crayon de couleur, papier 26,0 x 36,0 cm (chacun) La Synagogue de Delme, Delme

Loïc Raguénès, Moi, Christiane F, 2009 Crayon de couleur, papier, 31,0 x 25,0 cm (collection Cécile Bart)

 
advertisement advertisement advertisement