artwork image
artwork image
artwork image
artwork image
artwork image
artwork image
artwork image

English

Jean-Pascal Flavien

No Drama House

Vanessa Desclaux

Since September, Jean-Pascal Flavien’s No Drama House has occupied Gallery Giti Nourbakhsch’s courtyard in Berlin. Guided tour by Vanessa Desclaux.

Let’s imagine for a moment the following proposition: to live = to play. What is politically and aesthetically at stake in such a proposition? During our conversation about No Drama House (2009), Jean-Pascal Flavien mentioned a recording of Gilles Deleuze talking about the ‘load of anguish’ and its aesthetic consequences. The artist’s project echoes Deleuze’s questioning and his philosophical position on anguish and drama, themselves inspired by Baruch Spinoza and Friedrich Nietzsche’s thinking. No Drama House, and Flavien’s practice in general, raise the questions of the aesthetics of existence and the nature of happiness in relation to art. I’ve been warned: it’s not about utopia, criticism, or discourses. But instead of explaining further, the artist read me a short passage by Gertrude Stein.

‘He had a sister who also was successful enough in being one being living. His sister was one who came to be happier than most people come to be in living. (…) She came to be happier than anybody else who was living then. It is easy to believe this thing. She was telling some one, who was loving every story that was charming. Some one who was living was almost always listening. Some one who was loving was almost always listening. That one who was loving was almost always listening. That one who was loving was telling about being one then listening. That one being loving was then telling stories having a beginning and a middle and an ending. That one was then one always completely listening.’ 1

No Drama House is Flavien’s second house in 1:1 scale. Viewer, the previous one, was built in 2007 in Maricá, near Rio de Janeiro. These two realisations, as well as many other of the artist’s house projects, exist in a variety of forms: as models, drawings and publications. Before being the house one can see and visit in the courtyard of the Gallery Giti Nourbakhsch in Berlin, No Drama House was, for example, a book published in 2005 by Devonian Press – a publishing house led by Flavien and his artist friend Julien Bismuth.

No Drama House
Notes on a house with too many problems

A book forgotten in a night club

A loose book
A dancing book
A book of winds

Books published by Flavien and Bismuth – and on which they often collaborate –investigate the narrative, poetical and visual possibilities of the format, highlighting both artists’ interest in poetry, literature, and more generally, all the forms language can take. One of their collaborative projects, Plouf ! (2007), plays with semaphores, the complex maritime visual code. These books are artworks in their own right, a field of exchange and experimentation with no direct equivalent revealing the artists’ research’s singular journey as well as their artistic development.

Conceptually, Flavien’s houses are rather close to his books. And I’m not only talking about the link No Drama House (the house) may have with No Drama House (the book), but also about the relationship between the general concept of ‘house’ and of ‘book’. In both cases, the work spatially organises a shape and some content, and is set up according to aesthetic and semantic lines devoid of any precise rules (architectural principle or literary genre). If we had to start with a common denominator, we could perhaps say that ‘house’ and ‘book’ are fictions.

In his famous book Exercices de style (1947), Raymond Queneau wrote the same story in 99 different ways, changing, in turn, the writing style, the register, the order and the tone of the narration, even the literary genre. Queneau made a claim for the enjoyment of text through a game with words, their orders, synonymous, metaphors and all possible rhetorical figures. Despite the story’s simplicity, each of the 99 variations produces a new situation and a new fiction. Likewise, Flavien seems to have tackled his project like a game, or rather a play, embracing the double meaning of the English word. What is more, he directly refers to a poem by Robert Lax written on the lid of the boxes keeping the houses’ models.

‘wheN i play hOuse
i Don't play
eitheR the poppA
or the maMA

it's more
as tHOUgh i was playing
i waS
thE house’
2

The house as it is signified in Lax’s poem is an emotion-free setting. The role-playing game suggested here establishes the parameters of a fiction oblivious of the familial institution and its traditional conflicts. Lax’s minimal poetry echoes Flavien’s artistic approach, which puts in parallel the physical arrangement of the house (its outside shape, internal organisation and furniture) with minimal sculptures from the 1960s. No Drama House is an organisation of space whose main concern isn’t the functionality of a domestic space to be inhabited, but the creation of a series of situations which requires new gestures, movements, arrangement of the furniture, modes of use and narrations of the place.

No Drama House is an extremely narrow construction built on two levels, the first floor being only accessible through an external ladder. Many issues crop up if one starts to think about occupying in the house, but the artist announced this principle from the very beginning – let’s remember that the book’s title is: No Drama House. Notes on a house with too many problems. To live in this house has to become a game of inventing new ways to use each situation. The artist insists on this word ‘situation’ and refers to a house that can be taken to pieces in the American film One Week, realised by Buster Keaton and Edward F. Cline in 1920. The house creates situations, not dramas, and if the roof happens to be upside down or if it rains inside, everyone starts dancing ...

Flavien himself has obviously invented multiple uses for the house, investigating the possibilities opened up by these situations. His inventions necessitate long periods of stay: to sleep in the house, to work in the house or to welcome friends there – he, for example, invited the artist Matt Mullican for breakfast. Other projects have been envisaged: Play (a play which isn’t a play), and No Drama Cinema or Cinenoma. Play functions on the double meaning of the word (to play a game/a theatre play). Since there is no performance, Play isn’t a play as such: living in the house is already ‘playing’, it extends the possibilities of the place. One plays with spaces, the furniture, and the situations generated by the place and the presence of an audience. Flavien explains that No Drama Cinema or Cinenoma offers an experience of the house on which is superimposed a cinematographic experience. No Drama House’s outside surface is turned into a screen where mini-films (lasting from 3 seconds to 1 minute) are projected. Produced by the artist in the house, where he records gestures and fleeting situations, these films capture the passing and the forgetting of time. They encapsulate a lack of attention, and the time spent in this peculiar structure is at once real and fictional, altogether a place to live and a place of artistic production.

Jean-Pascal Flavien
No Drama House
September 2009 – Summer 2010
Gallery Giti Nourbakhsch, Berlin
www.nourbakhsch.de

1] Stein, Gertrude, Ada, Geography and Plays, Four Seasons Co., 1922

2] Lax, Robert, 33 poems, New York : New Directions,1988, p. 154. Le poème est ici mis en page par Jean-Pascal Flavien, proposant une lecture de No Drama House à travers le poème.

IMAGE CREDITS

Jean-Pascal Flavien, No Drama House, 2009
Kurtfüstenstrasse, Berlin

Jean-Pascal Flavien, No Drama House, 2009
Drawing with business card

Jean-Pascal Flavien, No Drama House at Night, 2009
Kurtfüstenstrasse, Berlin

Jean-Pascal Flavien, No Drama House, 2009
Model

Jean-Pascal Flavien, No Drama House, 2009
Models and shoeboxes, book

Jean-Pascal Flavien, No Drama House with furniture on the second floor, 2009

Français

Jean-Pascal Flavien

Vanessa Desclaux

Depuis septembre 2009, on peut voir la maison de Jean-Pascal Flavien No Drama House dans la cour de la galerie Giti Nourbakhsch à Berlin. Visite guidée par Vanessa Desclaux.

Et si on imaginait pour une durée indéterminée la proposition suivante : Vivre/Habiter = Jouer. Quels sont les enjeux politiques aussi bien qu’esthétiques de cette proposition? Lors de notre conversation au sujet de No Drama House (2009), Jean-Pascal Flavien évoque un enregistrement de Gilles Deleuze parlant de la "charge d’angoisse" et de ses conséquences esthétiques. Le projet fait écho à la proposition philosophique de Deleuze sur les enjeux de l’angoisse et du drame, inspirée des pensées de Baruch Spinoza et Friedrich Nietzsche. No Drama House et l’ensemble de l’œuvre de Flavien posent comme problématique l’esthétique de l’existence et la nature du bonheur en relation avec l’art. J’ai pourtant été mise en garde : il n’est pas question d’utopie, de critique ou de discours. L'artiste m’a plutôt lu un court passage de Gertrude Stein :

"He had a sister who also was successful enough in being one being living. His sister was one who came to be happier than most people come to be in living. (…) She came to be happier than anybody else who was living then. It is easy to believe this thing. She was telling some one, who was loving every story that was charming. Some one who was living was almost always listening. Some one who was loving was almost always listening. That one who was loving was almost always listening. That one who was loving was telling about being one then listening. That one being loving was then telling stories having a beginning and a middle and an ending. That one was then one always completely listening."1

No Drama House est la seconde maison que Flavien réalise à échelle 1 ; la précédente, Viewer, fut construite à Maricá, aux alentours de Rio de Janeiro au Brésil en 2007. Ces deux réalisations ainsi que d’autres projets de maisons, existent cependant sous de nombreuses autres formes : maquettes, dessins et publications. No Drama House, par exemple, avant d’être la maison que l’on peut voir et visiter depuis septembre 2009 dans la cour de la galerie Giti Nourbakhsch à Berlin, est un livre publié par Devonian Press en 2005, maison d’édition dont Flavien partage la direction artistique avec son ami artiste Julien Bismuth.

No Drama House
Notes on a house with too many problems

A book forgotten in a night club

A loose book
A dancing book
A book of winds

Les livres que Flavien et Bismuth publient ensemble, et sur lesquels ils collaborent très souvent, sont pensés dans leurs dimensions narratives, poétiques et visuelles ; ils mettent ainsi à jour l’intérêt des deux artistes pour la poésie, la littérature et plus généralement le langage sous toutes ses formes. Une de leurs collaborations, Plouf ! (2007), manipule les sémaphores, complexe code visuel utilisé dans le domaine maritime. Ces livres sont des œuvres à part entière, un terrain d’expérimentation et d’échange qui révèle le cheminement singulier de leur recherche et de leur travail plastique.

D’un point de vue conceptuel, les maisons de Flavien ne sont pas très éloignées de ses livres. Je ne parle pas seulement de la proximité que No Drama House (la maison) et No Drama House (le livre) peuvent entretenir, mais plus largement des relations entre le concept général de "maison" et celui de "livre". Dans les deux cas, l’œuvre organise spatialement une forme et un contenu et se distribue selon des lignes esthétiques et sémantiques qui ne suivent pas de règles précises (principe architectural ou genre littéraire). Si l’on doit partir d’un dénominateur commun, alors pourrait-on peut-être commencer par dire que "maison" et "livre" sont des fictions.

Dans son œuvre célèbre Exercices de style (1947), Raymond Queneau écrit la même histoire de 99 façons différentes, variant tour à tour le style de l’écriture, le niveau de langage, l’ordre et le ton de la narration, ou même le genre littéraire, tout en gardant les mêmes éléments d’intrigue. Queneau revendique le plaisir du texte par le biais du jeu avec les mots, leur ordre, leurs synonymes, leurs métaphores et autres figures poétiques possibles. Malgré la simplicité de la trame narrative, chacune des 99 configurations produit une nouvelle situation et une nouvelle fiction. Flavien semble avoir abordé son projet comme un jeu, ou plus exactement a play, tenant précisément compte de la polysémie du mot anglais. Il fait d’ailleurs directement référence à un poème de Robert Lax inscrit sur le couvercle des boîtes qui abritent les maquettes de la maison :

"wheN i play hOuse
i Don't play
eitheR the poppA
or the maMA

it's more
as tHOUgh i was playing
i waS
thE house"2

La maison telle qu’elle est signifiée dans le poème de Lax est une situation déchargée émotionnellement : le jeu de rôle qui est suggéré dans le poème établit les paramètres d’une fiction indifférente à l’institution familiale et ses conflits traditionnels. La poésie minimale de Lax fait ainsi écho à l’approche artistique de Flavien qui met en parallèle la configuration physique de la maison (sa forme extérieure, l’organisation de son espace intérieur et son mobilier) avec les sculptures minimales des années 1960. No Drama House est une organisation de l’espace dont la préoccupation n’est pas la fonctionnalité d’un espace de vie domestique mais qui, au contraire, engendre une série de situations qui demandent qu’on invente des gestes, des déplacements, des configurations du mobilier et des modes d’utilisation et de narration du lieu.

No Drama House est une maison extrêmement étroite, construite sur deux niveaux, mais dont l'étage est seulement accessible par une échelle à l’extérieur. Beaucoup de problèmes se posent lorsqu’on envisage l’idée de vivre dans cette maison. Mais c’est un principe que l’artiste avait annoncé dès le départ – rappelons le titre du livre : No Drama House. Notes on a house with too many problems. Habiter la maison doit donc devenir un jeu qui consiste à inventer une façon d’utiliser chaque situation. Flavien insiste sur le terme de "situation" et fait référence à la maison démontable dans le film One Week, réalisé par Buster Keaton et Edward F. Cline en 1920. La maison produit ainsi des situations et non des drames, et s’il arrive que le toit soit à l’envers ou qu’il pleuve dans la maison, alors tout le monde danse…

Flavien a évidemment lui-même inventé de multiples usages pour la maison, explorant toutes les potentialités offertes par ces situations. Ces inventions devront nécessairement passer par des périodes prolongées de résidence : y dormir, y travailler et y accueillir des amis lors de rendez-vous – il a par exemple invité l’artiste Matt Mullican à venir y prendre un petit-déjeuner. D’autres projets ont été envisagés : Play (une pièce de théâtre qui n’en est pas une) et No Drama Cinema ou Cinenoma. Play est un jeu de mot sur les deux sens du mot anglais, qui signifie "jouer" mais aussi "pièce de théâtre". Play n’est pas tout à fait une pièce de théâtre car il n’y a pas de "représentation" : habiter la maison, c’est déjà "jouer". La pièce est une simple extension de la vie du lieu. On y joue avec les espaces, les meubles et les situations engendrées par la réalité de la maison et la présence du public. Flavien explique que No Drama Cinema ou Cinenoma propose une expérience de la maison doublée par l’expérience cinématographique. La surface extérieure de No Drama House devient un écran où sont projetés les micro-films de l'artiste (de 3 secondes à 1 minute) produits dans la maison où il enregistre des gestes et des situations passagères. Ces films capturent le temps qui passe et l’oubli du temps, ils saisiront peut-être l’inattention et le temps "perdu" passé dans ce dispositif singulier, réel et fictionnel, à la fois lieu de vie et de production artistique.

Jean-Pascal Flavien
No Drama House
Septembre 2009 – été 2010
Gallery Giti Nourbakhsch, Berlin
www.nourbakhsch.de

1] Stein, Gertrude, Ada, Geography and Plays, Four Seasons Co., 1922

2] Robert Lax, 33 poems, New York : New Directions,1988, p. 154. The poem is here laid out by Flavien who suggests a reading of No Drama House within the poem.

IMAGE CREDITS

Jean-Pascal Flavien, No Drama House, 2009
Kurtfüstenstrasse, Berlin

Jean-Pascal Flavien, No Drama House, 2009
Drawing with business card

Jean-Pascal Flavien, No Drama House at Night, 2009
Kurtfüstenstrasse, Berlin

Jean-Pascal Flavien, No Drama House, 2009
Model

Jean-Pascal Flavien, No Drama House, 2009
Models and shoeboxes, book

Jean-Pascal Flavien, No Drama House with furniture on the second floor, 2009

 
advertisement advertisement advertisement