artwork image
artwork image
artwork image
artwork image
artwork image
artwork image
artwork image

English

Ida Applebroog, Latest News

Elisabeth Lebovici

Of the same generation as Nancy Spero, the New Yorker Ida Applebroog waited until 45 for her start in the art world. Elisabeth Lebovici describes an artist defined by her obscure realism.

I have a habit we may share. As the train approaches a station, I look both outside and inside, through vehicles’ windows and through the windows of houses, apartments and buildings we pass by. Because there's nothing to see - one always goes by too quickly - these places constitute a vanishing point for the imagination that owes everything to the repletion of stereotypes and readymade visions verging on abstraction, their evanescence sketching the fiction of a mental tracking shot.

Other people’s windows

This is more or less how Francine Prose began the text she wrote for a book dedicated to Ida Applebroog (Are You Bleeding Yet, Ida Applebroog, ed. Benjamin Lignel, New York, La Maison Red, 2002). She was right to: Applebroog's paintings, installations, drawings, watercolours, books, manuscripts, screens, films and videos are often figurative variations set up inside a frame. The idea contained in the word 'frame', which signifies altogether the image and its limits, the content and the vessel, is highlighted by the repetition of a window inside the panel or the paper, a shape evoking a slide, a TV screen or a comic strip. It is also signified by the drawing of curtains or blinds. The image is repeated again in a set of intriguing predellas underneath or beside the main scene - these tiny images sometimes being included inside the picture like a stamp on a letter. Occasionally, the panels are multiplied, fragmenting once again Applebroog’s metropolitan vision. ‘I’m always looking through other people’s windows’, she says.

Through Applebroog’s windows, one can discover the turpitudes of shared life as well as the dysfunctions within heterosexual couples, genders, and generations. As on the margins of medieval manuscripts, there are mythological inventions and phantasmagorical creatures which demonstrate how much this work undermines the binary categorisations opposing the beauty and the beast, archaic tales and political rhetoric, painting and postmodern reproducibility. In all her narrations, which usually start from the middle without having either beginning or end, the faces are remote, their expressions (if they have one) mask-like. This is what the artist called in 1977 her ‘obscure realism’, a way to merge, while depicting, resignation and brutality, even though violence has become more and more present in recent years.

Gazing into a chamber

Born in the Bronx, New York, in 1929, Applebroog studied at the New York State Institute of Applied Arts and Sciences, then at the Art Institute in Chicago (1968), hence much later than Nancy Spero with whom she’s occasionally compared - both are roughly from the same generation, feminist and pacifist, both distanced from the macho-market system. But Applebroog, who taught in San Diego, California before returning to New York in 1974, waited until she was 45 before starting in the art world.

She first gained recognition (whatever the impropriety of the term) with the books she sent to some art critics, art dealers and artists - for better or worse (she has kept the hateful messages she received back). From 1981, the artist began to show her work regularly at Ronald Feldman Fine Arts. Applebroog belongs to the artist-as-a-picture-collector trend as it emerged in the early '80s. During the same period, her daughter was becoming a key New Talkies filmmaker. Applebroog's work echoes as much Keith Haring's or Cindy Sherman's as it does David Salle's. Yet unlike Salle, who, wrote the feminist critic Mira Schor, 'retain[s] the conventional position of gazing into a chamber (whose occupant is most likely to be a woman)', in Applebrood's practice 'the traditional spaces of femininity – living room, bedroom, kitchen – become the viewfinder of a vast camera obscura (...) host to an outer world, inhabited by men, women, children, and animals who spill into “woman’s world” at great speed and in tumultuous moral equivalence.'1

The Modern Olympias fire back

Applebroog's work was shown in Paris in 2009 (Ida Applebroog. L’Intime Politique, at Nathalie Parienté, Projet 38 Wilson, Paris), and in 2010 can be seen in New York (Ida Applebroog MONA LISA, Hauser & Wirth, 19/01-06/03/2010). In Paris, an ensemble of pictures, works on paper and small scale sculptures showed a variety of spaces, figures and stories if not typical then at least exemplary of the artist's production. In Fatty fatty two by four! (1993), the oversized nose of a kid in boy's Y fronts, its face covered in black, seems to demand an extra vignette to be added to the main image; likewise in Marginalia (woman measuring waist) (1994) the extra length of a tape measure with which a woman is measuring her waist asks for a rectangular extension of the picture, one that would include everything that is generally excluded, linking to the whole social fantasy of the monstrous. Applebrood doesn't exclude anything, there are no dichotomies in her world (I’m rubber, you’re glue, 1993). Four little pictures show four faces which progressively abandon their style and their silhouettes in a hallucinated state of the line: one is vibrating, another is dissolving, spreading onto the support. The drawing of a naked woman wearing high-heels seems to dictate the shape of the paper on which she is laid, where she is at once vertical and sitting down (Modern Olympia, after Versace, 1997-2001). Applebroog asserts one of her recurrent titles, Modern Olympias - a title borrowed from Cezanne, who himself borrowed it from Manet - by adding to these well-known references other brands, from Versace to Georgia O'Keefe. What can the nude be in the so-called post-feminist age? The artist keeps the question open.

Mona Lisa

At Hauser & Wirth, one can literally rediscover Applebroog in the installation Mona Lisa (2009). The structural elements of a house host a series of drawings building four walls without an entrance door. These drawings are a remake based on around 160 drawings of her vulva that Applebroog realised in her bathroom as a sort of female equivalent to Duchamp's Étant donnés: 1° la chute d'eau, 2° le gaz d'éclairage . . . (1946-1966) shown at Philadelphia Museum of Art the same erotic year of 1969. Traced with ink or graphite, sketched or detailed, these genital self-portraits of the artist retrieved recently (some are presented as archive in another part of the gallery) have been scanned, manipulated and printed on Japanese paper with coloured liquid. On these new paper skins, the vulvas are only visible when held up to the light, leading to a dramatic change in the exchanges of gaze, linked to the inside and the outside, interiority and 'extimacy'.

Their function as a velum in this spatial arrangement plays with the sexual. This is perhaps how to understand the anxiety in Applebroog's work, which alienates the familiar like the Freudian Unheimliche. The work's alarming strangeness lies in fact that it embodies the enigma of a gaze that doesn't subscribe to the hypothesis of sex differences, where this gaze would justify its power by a body's penetrability. The urge of representation questions here pictures' destiny.

1] Mira Schor, ‘Medusa Redux: Ida Applebroog and the Spaces of Post-Modernity’, Artforum, March 1990. Reprinted in Wet, On Painting, Feminism and Art Culture, Duke University Press, 1997, pp. 67-81.

IMAGE CREDITS

Ida Applebroog, Modern Olympia, 1997-2001
Conté sur papier Arches
Courtesy Nathalie Parienté

Ida Applebroog, Mona Lisa, 2010
Installation à la galerie Hauser & Wirth, New York
Courtesy Hauser & Wirth

Ida Applebroog, Dessin Group B, 2, 1969
Courtesy Hauser & Wirth

Ida Applebroog, Modern Olympia (After Versace), 1997-2001 Huile et fusain sur papier Gampi, 2 panneaux
Courtesy Nathalie Parienté

Ida Applebroog, Tobias, 2007
Technique mixte sur toile
Courtesy Nathalie Parienté

Ida Applebroog, exhibition view, Nathalie Parienté
Courtesy Nathalie Parienté

Ida Applebroog, exhibition view, Nathalie Parienté
Courtesy Nathalie Parienté

   

Français

Actualité d’Ida Applebroog

Elisabeth Lebovici

De la même génération que Nancy Spero, la new-yorkaise Ida Applebroog a attendu l’âge de 45 ans pour s'inscrire dans le monde de l’art. Portrait d'une artiste au réalisme obscur par Elisabeth Lebovici.

Evoquons une petite habitude, que nous avons peut-être en commun. Celle qui consiste, dans le métro, le RER, le train en ville à l’approche d’une gare, à regarder au-dehors et en même temps au-dedans, à travers les vitres des véhicules et, en même temps, des maisons, des appartements, des immeubles. À n’y rien voir—on passe toujours un peu trop vite—ces lieux constituent le point de fuite d’une imagination qui doit tout, moins à l’invention qu’à la répétition de stéréotypes et de visions readymade touchant à l’abstraction, tant leur évanescence propose la fiction d’un traveling psychique.

La fenêtre des autres

Voilà, à peu de choses près, comment commence le texte de l’écrivaine Francine Prose dans le gros livre consacré à Ida Applebroog (Are You Bleeding Yet, Ida Applebroog, ed. Benjamin Lignel, New York, la Maison Red, 2002). Je ne peux que lui donner raison : les tableaux, installations, dessins, aquarelles, livres, manuscrits, écrans lumineux, films ou vidéos d’Applebroog consistent souvent en variations figuratives, mises en scène à l’intérieur d’un cadre. L’idée contenue dans le mot anglais frame, qui signifie à la fois l’image et les limites, le contenu et le contenant, est ici le plus souvent soulignée par la répétition d’une fenêtre à l’intérieur du panneau ou du papier, qui lui donne parfois l’allure d’une image de diapositive, d’écran télé ou d’une bande dessinée. Elle est également signifiée par le dessin de rideaux ou d’un store. Elle est aussi redondée par d’étranges prédelles sur, sous ou à côté de la scène principale, ou encore déplacées à l’intérieur de celle-ci, comme un timbre sur une lettre. Parfois les panneaux se multiplient, de façon à rendre encore plus complexe et fragmentée la vision "métropolitaine" d’Applebroog, laquelle énonce : "je regarde toujours par la fenêtre des autres."

Par les fenêtres d’Applebroog se présentent, passent et repassent les charmes discrets de la vie en commun (une litote) et les dysfonctionnements du couple hétérosexuel, des genres et des générations. Et puis, comme dans les marges des manuscrits du Moyen-Âge, se développent également des dérivations mythologiques et des créatures fantasmatiques. C’est dire aussi combien ce travail fait exploser les catégorisations binaires, qui voudraient opposer la belle et la bête, les récits archaïques et la monstration politique, la peinture et la reproductibilité post-moderne. Dans toutes ses narrations, qui arrivent le plus souvent par le milieu et n’ont ni début ni fin, les visages sont distants. Leur expression, lorsqu’ils en sont dotés, est celle d’un masque. Voilà ce que l’artiste appelle son "réalisme obscur" (1977) : une façon de confondre, en la dépeignant, la résignation plus que la brutalité, même si la violence est devenue plus manifeste avec les années récentes.

Chambre obscure

Née en 1929 dans le Bronx, à New York, Applebroog a étudié à l’Institut des arts appliqués et des sciences de l’Etat de New York, puis à l’école de l’Art Institute de Chicago (1968), bien plus tardivement que Nancy Spero, à laquelle on la compare parfois : elles étaient à peu près de la même génération et furent, également, féministes et pacifistes militantes, se tenant longtemps à l’écart du système macho-marchand. Mais Applebroog, qui enseigna à San Diego (Californie) avant de retourner à New York en 1974, a attendu l’âge de 45 ans pour s’inscrire dans le monde de l’art.

Elle se fit connaître d’abord—le terme connaître est bien impropre ici—par les livres qu’elle envoyait à un certain nombre de critiques, galeristes ou artistes, pour le meilleur et le pire (elle garda les messages haineux). Commençant d’exposer régulièrement en 1981 chez Ronald Feldman Fine Arts, elle s’est inscrite sous l’égide du monde des artistes collecteurs ou collectrices d’images, qui s’établit au tournant des années 1980, en même temps que sa fille Beth B devenait l’une des réalisatrices-phares des "nouveaux films parlants" (New Talkies). L’œuvre d’Applebroog, alors, résonne aussi bien avec les travaux de Keith Haring ou ceux de Cindy Sherman qu’avec ceux de David Salle ; cependant, comme l’a énoncé la critique féministe Mira Schor, alors que ce dernier "conserve la position conventionnelle de regarder à l’intérieur d’une pièce (dont l’occupante sera à coup sûr, une femme)", Applebroog, en revanche "va faire des espaces traditionnels de la féminité—salon, chambre, cuisine—les viseurs d’une vaste camera obscura (…) accueillant dans ses peintures un monde habité par des hommes, des femmes, des enfants, des animaux dispersés à grande vitesse au sein d’un ‘woman’s world’1."

La revanche des Modernes Olympias

Deux occasions récentes ont été données de voir exposées des œuvres d’Applebroog : fin 2009 à Paris (Ida Applebroog. L’Intime Politique, chez Nathalie Parienté, Projet 38 Wilson, Paris) et à New York (Ida Applebroog Monalisa, Hauser & Wirth, 19/01-06/03/2010). À Paris, un ensemble de tableaux, travaux sur papier et petites sculptures a présenté une palette d’espaces, de figures et de récits sinon typiques, du moins exemplaires du travail d’Applebroog. Ainsi Fatty fatty two by four ! (1993), où le nez démesuré d’un personnage enfantin en slip de garçon et visage passé au noir semble avoir exigé qu’un tableautin supplémentaire soit ajouté au format principal ; il en est de même avec Marginalia (woman measuring waist) (1994) où les retombées du mètre souple avec lequel une femme se mesure la taille demandent un prolongement rectangulaire, pour inclure ce qui est généralement exclu, qui a trait à toute une fantasmatique sociale quant à la monstruosité. En ce sens, Applebroog n’exclut rien, il n’y a pas dans son monde de telles dichotomies (I’m rubber, you’re glue, 1993). Quatre petits tableaux représentent quatre visages, qui se défont chacun de leur genre et de leurs contours par un état halluciné du trait : celui-là vibre, se délaye, se répand sur le support. Le dessin d’une femme nue portant des hauts talons semble déterminer la forme du papier qui la couche, mais sur lequel elle semble à la fois verticale et assise (Modern Olympia, after Versace, 1997-2001) : c’est ici aussi que s’affirme l’un des titres récurrents d’Applebroog : les Modernes Olympias (titre emprunté à Cézanne, empruntant lui même à Manet), têtes de séries auxquelles l’artiste imprime d’autres marques de fabrique, de Versace à Georgia O’Keeffe. Qu’en est-il du nu féminin à l’âge soi disant post-féministe ? L’artiste maintient la question ouverte.

Mona Lisa

Chez Hauser &Wirth, le jeu de la redécouverte d’Applebroog s’effectue, littéralement, dans l’installation Mona Lisa (2009). Les éléments structurels d’une maison servent de cadre à un accrochage de dessins construisant quatre parois, sans porte d’entrée. Ces dessins sont la reprise d’une centaine, parmi les 160 dessins de sa vulve qu’Applebroog fit dans sa salle de bains de son vagin—une sorte de pendant à Étant donnés: 1° la chute d'eau, 2° le gaz d'éclairage . . . (1946-1966), de Marcel Duchamp, pièce révélée au Musée de Philadelphie la même érotique année 1969. Tracés à l’encre ou au crayon, esquissés ou détaillés, ces autoportraits génitaux de l’artiste, récemment retrouvés (et dont certains sont présentés en archive dans une autre partie de la galerie) ont été scannés, manipulés et reportés sur du papier japonais en même temps qu’ils étaient agrémentés de jus colorés. Sur cette nouvelle peau de papier ils sont alors devenus visibles par transparence et conduisent ainsi à de renversants échanges de regards, qui concernent aussi l’intérieur et l’extérieur, l’intériorité et "l’extime".

Leur fonction de velum dans cette conception spatiale joue avec le sexuel. Peut-être est-ce dans ce sens qu’il faut ici comprendre l’inquiétude du travail d’Applebroog, qui défamiliarise le familier à l’instar de l’Unheimliche Freudien. Son angoissante étrangeté réside en ce que ce travail pose l’énigme d’un regard qui ne souscrit pas à l’hypothèse d’une différence des sexes, où ce regard justifierait sa maîtrise par la ‘pénétrabililité’ d’un corps (si je puis me permettre ce barbarisme). C’est ainsi que la pulsion de représentation vient ici questionner le destin des images.

1] Mira Schor, ‘Medusa Redux: Ida Applebroog and the Spaces of Post-Modernity’, Artforum, mars 1990. Reimprimé dans Wet, On Painting, Feminism and Art Culture, Duke University Press, 1997, pp. 67-81.

IMAGE CREDITS

Ida Applebroog, Modern Olympia, 1997-2001
Conté sur papier Arches
Courtesy Nathalie Parienté

Ida Applebroog, Mona Lisa, 2010
Installation à la galerie Hauser & Wirth, New York
Courtesy Hauser & Wirth

Ida Applebroog, Dessin Group B, 2, 1969
Courtesy Hauser & Wirth

Ida Applebroog, Modern Olympia (After Versace), 1997-2001 Huile et fusain sur papier Gampi, 2 panneaux
Courtesy Nathalie Parienté

Ida Applebroog, Tobias, 2007
Technique mixte sur toile
Courtesy Nathalie Parienté

Ida Applebroog, exhibition view, Nathalie Parienté
Courtesy Nathalie Parienté

Ida Applebroog, exhibition view, Nathalie Parienté
Courtesy Nathalie Parienté

 
advertisement advertisement advertisement