artwork image
artwork image
artwork image
artwork image
artwork image
artwork image
artwork image
artwork image
artwork image

English

Plastic Gestures

Ian Kiaer - Gyan Panchal

Coline Milliard

Coline Milliard ventures a parallel between the understated practices of Ian Kiaer and Gyan Panchal.

Why dream up a conversation between two participants hardly aware of the exercise? Curiosity? Intuition? Ian Kiaer lives in London, Gyan Panchal, in Paris. They were born two years apart (1971 and 1973 respectively) and each has championed from his own side of the Channel an artistic trend favouring understated propositions and precarious assemblages – one that is currently taking the art world by quiet storm (see Laura McLean-Ferris’ article in Catalogue 1). From a distance, Kiaer and Panchal’s works appear to investigate similar kinds of problems: their chunks of polystyrene and loosely hanging synthetic sheets share a feel of impermanence, their solo exhibitions – rigorously organised yet eluding formal and conceptual rigidity –seem at once precisely arranged and on the verge of collapse.

Oscillation

But a closer look at these artists' productions complexifies such a parallel. Since his 1999 installation Brueghel Project / Casa Malaparte, Kiaer’s practice has involved extensive research into modernist architecture, painting’s legacy, notions of exile and utopia. While Kiaer excavates little-known history, Panchal sets out to create some from scratch. The French sculptor regularly tackles blocks of plastic foam straight out of the factory, forcing them to disclose their fabrication’s process. Kiaer looks outward, scrutinising the remnants of the past, perhaps to suggest the past’s contemporary relevance. Panchal uncovers what is now. Described by French critic Etienne Bernard as a ‘geologist of the contemporary’, Panchal looks inward, deep inside, stripping bare the nature of his chosen material.

But the pendulum swings back, and in spite of their divergent starting points, both bodies of works chime with each other. The two artists’ discreet plastic gestures suggest comparable musings on the nature of found material, representation, and the possibility – not to say the necessity – of a certain kind of hermeticism.

Talk!

Upfront, Panchal’s pristine plastic foams look mute, remote from their legitimate uses of insulation and protection. Unlike other architectural materials, like stone or wood, they have no link to the sculptural tradition, they are new born – slabs of pure potential as puzzling and impenetrable as the monolith in the opening scene of Kubrick’s 2001: A Space Odyssey (1968). The artist seeks to expand the possibilities of this material, experimenting with other ways for it to exist in the world in a more direct relationship to the human scale. His selecting process might in itself be enough to singularise the mass-produced, but it’s his often-modest interventions that most efficiently allow his material ‘to talk’ (the architect Louis Kahn has a special significance for Panchal, and the artist has used part of Kahn’s most famous quotation – ‘I asked the brick, “What do you like, brick?” And the brick said, I like an arch’ – as an exhibition title). In eca (2005), one polystyrene block leans on another, the structure’s lower part having been hollowed out as if with an ice-cream scoop. The resulting ovoid fragments, tucked away like a compromising piece of evidence, mirror the thousands of conglomerated balls constituting the block. With a formal stutter, Panchal demystifies polystyrene’s blunt unity; he exposes the constructed nature of its apparent wholeness and uncovers the (or at least a) reality of the object.

If physical intervention is the first step in Panchal’s ‘geological’ excavation, concurrent presentation is often the second. cija (2009), a folded plastic sheet filled with an oyster and pinned to the wall, visually summarises the history of the material it uses: from shells, to seabed sediment, to petrol, to plastic. Things seemingly at odds are shown as parts of the same cycle. This logic governs phol (2008), a wall-hung nude pink sheet of cellulose acetate punctured with a round hole. The shape is repeated on the floor by a tree trunk cross-section, as if the wood had been cut out of the fabric, such highlighting cellulose’s organic provenance (it’s obtained mainly from wood pulp). Instead of the commonly accepted dichotomy between ‘natural’ and ‘synthetic’, Panchal establishes a genealogical filiation. But this reconciliation doesn’t signal an indifference to the issues plastic-based materials bring in their trail. The artist claims not to follow any political agenda, but his work can’t escape current ecological debates. The often non-putrecible nature of his medium echoes the ‘immortality’ of marble sculpture while bearing the worrying threat of earth’s progressive intoxication.

Afterlife

Kiaer’s sparse installations are equally concerned with plastic objects’ afterlife, though they seize the problem from the opposite end of the consumption chain. In Ulchiro project: pond (2007) – part of a series of works initiated in Seoul, South Korea – a soiled slab of foam leans against the wall; Isandong proposal / National Fishing Competition (2001) comprises two polystyrene fish containers; in Endless Theatre project / Ledoux: Besançon (auditorium) (2003), the nylon of an umbrella softly spreads on the floor. This debris grounds Kiaer’s intellectual endeavour in a grotty reality; the duality highlights a paradox that, according to Mark Godfrey, Kiaer’s work ‘has continued to explore: that the tatty object can explode impossible fantasies, and that fantastic dreams can be rooted in the grubby and the everyday.’ As in Brueghel’s Landscape with the Fall of Icarus (c.1555) – a crucial reference for the artist – great aspirations and down-to-earth existence share the same space.

Despite the intrinsic disparity between the quality of the material Kiaer and Panchal gather, chance plays a crucial role in their respective selecting methods (Panchal describes his as a ‘promenade’). No system or programme governs their choices; in both instances, the artists demonstrate a striking availability to unplanned encounters and an openness to their materials’ possibilities. This openness can also be found in the ‘in process’ nature of their production. For Panchal the exhibition is a time for research, when the works and their possible interactions can be tested. Usually including the word ‘project’, Kiaer’s titles announce upfront the in-development nature of the pieces to which they are attached. For Kiaer and Panchal, artworks are not finished, final propositions, but selected moments in ongoing inquiries.

Picture Plane

Panchal’s spectacularly titled HHeLiBeBCNOFNeNaMgAlSiPSClArKCaSc
TiVCrMnFeCoNiCuZnGaGeAsSeBHHeLiBeBCNOFNe
NaMgAlSiPSClArKCaScTiVCrMnFeCoNiCuZnGaGeAs
SeBrKrRbSrYZrNbMoTcRuRhPdAgCdInSnSbTeIXeCs
BaLaCePrNdPmSmEuGdTbDyHoErTmYbLuHfTaWReOsIr
PtAuHgTlPbBiPoAtRnFrRaAcThPaUNpPuAmCmBkCfEs
FmMdNoLrRfDbSgBhHsMtUunUuuUubUutUuqUupUuh
UusUuo
(2003) is a wall drawing superimposing the elemental symbols found in Mendeleev’s periodic table. This jungle of lines, tightly intertwined, destroys the established order and suggests another, perhaps more accurate, depiction of the world: back to the original chaos. This use of drawn symbols is quite unusual for an artist who has clearly chosen ‘presentation’ over ‘representation’. Panchal’s sculptures may occasionally allude to recognizable elements – see, for example, the Stonehenge-esque blue polystyrene arch gaet (2008) – but they usually stand for what they are, confronting the viewer with their physicality and half-revealed genesis. Kiaer’s installations often more directly ‘stand for’ something else, his makeshift architectural models echoing Buckminster Fuller’s domes or Claude-Nicolas Ledoux’s theatre design. Yet other elements consistently blur the relationship between research topic and plastic outcome, Kiaer taking a tangential route, at once giving in to and resisting direct representation.

This ambiguity may owe something to Kiaer’s training as a painter and his enduring relationship with the medium. Silhouettes borrowed from Brueghel’s pictures keep cropping up, reaffirming a link to painting the artist had threatened by moving into the tri-dimensional. His ubiquitous wall elements (be they watercolours or plastic sheeting) also preserve this relationship to the picture plane. In an interview with Caoimhín Mac Giolla Léith, Kiaer talks about his problems conveying a narrative on a single surface. His work could be understood as expanded painting, he says, in that ‘it moved beyond the frame’. And this crossing between painting and sculpture resonates with Panchal’s recent sculptures. In pieces such as the black sheet of polyethylene ptomn (2009), or in ghelis (2009) – a veil of polypropylene half-died with turmeric – the material, too fragile to stand upright, demands a wall exist and remain visible. Such pieces have immediate associations with colour field painting, Barnett Newman, Mark Rothko, but also Pierre Soulages and the pictorial deconstructions of the French movement Supports/Surfaces. Likewise, Panchal’s 2003 piece leh, a tiny pool of crude oil, stands like the original stain, raw pictorial material (as well as first incarnation of the artist’s plastics). Sculptural painting versus, and, or pictorial sculpture? Kiaer and Panchal’s work resists classification and denounces the defining of a practice in terms of medium. The artists come from distinct artistic traditions but reject tradition’s ties.

Wide Closed

Looking at Kiaer and Panchal’s production one cannot help wondering what kind of experience their work is offering to the unprepared viewer. Is phol telling enough in itself to evoke cellulose’s production? How to approach Ulchiro project: pond if one doesn’t know anything about contemporary Korea? As an enticing composition? An intriguing assemblage? Is it possible, without any information, to go beyond a purely formal and sensorial enjoyment of the work? And if not, is it a problem? Kiaer and Panchal can’t be unaware of these issues. ‘There will inevitably be a gap’, says Kiaer, ‘between my intention and thinking around the work, and the viewer’s initial encounter.’ Even if one knows a little about Kiaer’s all-important back-stories, numerous elements in his works remain willingly obscure. Both artists make space for the incomprehensible. Like seeing a play performed in foreign language, this could be alienating, but it could also be liberating, allowing the beholders to fill the interpretative gaps with their own stories, projections, or fictions. Kiaer and Panchal undermine the belief that an artist’s research and production are equivalent to preparation and outcome, suggesting instead a freer approach to knowledge. Rather than a chronological development from research to artwork, here are two individual paths, the intellectual and the formal, occasionally meeting but essentially divergent. Kiaer and Panchal’s pieces may be disconcerting, but it’s precisely in this elusiveness that their strength lies. Not only do the artists reject the myth of the ‘pure encounter’ with an art that must be immediately comprehensible without prior knowledge, but they also undermine the idea that an artwork is a text waiting for exegeses, a code to be cracked.

IMAGE CREDITS

Ian Kiaer, Ulchiro project: pond, 2007
Acrylic on linen, foam, tupperware
Installation dimensions: 190 x 105 x 19 cms / 74 3/4 x 41 3/8 x 7 1/2 ins
Courtesy the artist and Alison Jacques Gallery
Gyan Panchal, gaet, 2008
Polystyrène extrudé poncé
240 x 120 x 60 cm
Pièce unique
Courtesy Frank Elbaz

Gyan Panchal, eca, 2005
Polystyrène expansé
60 x 120 x 250 cm chaque (2 éléments)
Pièce unique
Courtesy Frank Elbaz

Gyan Panchal, phol, 2008
Acétate de cellulose, bois
247 x 154 x 77 cm
Pièce unique
Vue de l’exposition Gyan Panchal, Emba/galerie Edouard Manet, 15 mai – 14 juin 2008, Gennevilliers, France
© Galerie Edouard Manet - Gennevilliers
© Photo: Laurent Lecat
Courtesy Frank Elbaz

Ian Kiaer, , 2007
Acrylic on linen, foam, tupperware
Installation dimensions: 190 x 105 x 19 cms / 74 3/4 x 41 3/8 x 7 1/2 ins
Courtesy the artist and Alison Jacques Gallery

Ian Kiaer, Ulchiro project: pond, 2007
Acrylic on linen, foam, tupperware
Installation dimensions: 190 x 105 x 19 cms / 74 3/4 x 41 3/8 x 7 1/2 ins
Courtesy the artist and Alison Jacques Gallery

Ian Kiaer, Insadong proposal / National Fishing Competition, 2001
Polystyrene, plastic, watercolour on linen Installation dimensions variable
Courtesy the artist and Alison Jacques Gallery

Ian Kiaer, Endless Theatre Project / Ledoux: Besaçon (auditorium), 2003 5 parts: umbrella material and rubber, roofing insulation and black cloth, Korean ink on taffeta mounted on lighting gel on cotton, large football bladder, small football bladder
Installation dimensions variable
Courtesy the artist, Tanya Bonakdar Gallery, New York, and Alison Jacques Gallery, London

Gyan Panchal, HHeLiBeBCNOFNeNaMgAlSiPSClArKCaSc
TiVCrMnFeCoNiCuZnGaGeAsSeBHHeLiBeBCNOFNe
NaMgAlSiPSClArKCaScTiVCrMnFeCoNiCuZnGaGeAs
SeBrKrRbSrYZrNbMoTcRuRhPdAgCdInSnSbTeIXeCs
BaLaCePrNdPmSmEuGdTbDyHoErTmYbLuHfTaWReOsIr
PtAuHgTlPbBiPoAtRnFrRaAcThPaUNpPuAmCmBkCfEs
FmMdNoLrRfDbSgBhHsMtUunUuuUubUutUuqUupUuhUusUuo
, 2003
Marqueur noir
Dimensions variables
Pièce unique
Courtesy Frank Elbaz

Gyan Panchal, ptomn, 2009
Polyéthylène
Dimensions variables
Pièce unique
Vue de l’exposition “brick says: I like an arch”, Le SPOT, Le Havre, France, 2009
© le SPOT, Le Havre
Photo : André Morin, Paris
Courtesy Frank Elbaz

Français

Gestes plastiques

Ian Kiaer - Gyan Panchal

Coline Milliard

Tentative d’étude comparée entre les œuvres d'Ian Kiaer et Gyan Panchal.

Pourquoi faire dialoguer le travail de deux artistes à peine au courant de l'affaire? La curiosité ? L'intuition ? Ian Kiaer habite à Londres, Gyan Panchal à Paris. Nés à deux ans d'intervalle (en 1971 et 1973), ces artistes sont les fers de lance d’une tendance artistique favorisant le geste minimal qui a récemment déferlé des deux côtés de la Manche (voir l'article "Soutenance de thèse" de Laura McLean-Ferris dans le premier numéro de Catalogue). Les œuvres de Kiaer et Panchal révèlent d’ailleurs d'emblée certains points communs : leurs morceaux de polystyrène et matières synthétiques délicatement installés dégagent la même sensation de fragilité. L'accrochage de leurs œuvres est à la fois précis et précaire ; l'extrême minutie de leurs expositions bat en brèche toute rigidité formelle et conceptuelle.

Oscillation

Ce premier postulat se complexifie au fil de la recherche. L'installation Brueghel Project/Casa Malaparte (1999) a marqué pour Kiaer le début d'une recherche approfondie sur l'architecture moderne, l'héritage de la peinture et les notions d'exil et d'utopie. Contrairement à Kiaer en quête des secrets enfouis de l'histoire, Panchal part de zéro pour révéler le processus de fabrication de ses blocs en mousse isolants, tout droit sortis d'usine. Kiaer se positionne à l'extérieur de la matière pour scruter les reliques du passé, et peut-être questionner leur pertinence dans notre monde contemporain. Décrit par le critique d’art Etienne Bernard comme un "géologue du contemporain", Panchal, lui, conjugue son œuvre au présent. Il regarde l'intérieur, dans les profondeurs les plus lointaines des plastiques qu’il utilise, pour mieux mettre à nu leur véritable nature.

Mais ces divergences se dissipent rapidement, laissant les deux corpus raisonner l’un avec l’autre. Les gestes plastiques de Kiaer et Panchal questionnent la vérité des matériaux, leur représentation et la possibilité (pour ne pas dire la nécessité) d'une certaine dose d'hermétisme. D'où cet article, conçu comme une oscillation, une navigation entre ces deux œuvres.

Matière, parle-moi !

Les blocs de mousse immaculés de Panchal sont, au premier abord, difficiles à cerner. Ils semblent abscons, une fois détachés de leur fonction d'isolation et de protection. Contrairement à d'autres matériaux de construction comme la pierre ou le bois, ils n'ont aucune filiation avec la sculpture traditionnelle. Ces blocs de matière, littéralement "nouveaux-nés", dégagent un potentiel aussi déroutant et impénétrable que le monolithe de 2001, l'Odyssée de l'espace (1968). Les œuvres de Panchal élargissent les possibilités de la matière, elles proposent aux plastiques d'autres moyens d’exister dans le monde, en relation plus directe avec l'échelle humaine. En choisissant ces types de matériaux, l'artiste les arrache à leur production de masse pour les faire "parler" grâce à de discrètes interventions (Panchal admire beaucoup l'architecte Louis Kahn et cite sa fameuse phrase qui a servi de titre d'exposition : "Qu'est-ce que tu veux la brique ? " et la brique répond : "Une arche"). Eca (2005) est un bloc de polystyrène posé contre un autre dont la partie inférieure a été évidée comme avec une cuillère à glace. Les fragments ovoïdes ainsi récupérés (et escamotés comme une preuve trop compromettante) imitent les milliers de billes conglomérées qui constituent le bloc. Ce bégaiement formel démystifie l'unité brute du polystyrène et expose la nature construite de l'ensemble pour dévoiler la (ou une) réalité de l'objet.

Si la première étape de ce processus d'excavation "géologique" consiste à intervenir physiquement sur la matière plastique, la seconde étape est généralement une présentation simultanée des deux états chimiques de la matière (de son origine à son ultime transformation). Cija (2009), une feuille de plastique pliée au mur avec une huître à l'intérieur, résume d'un coup d'œil l'histoire du matériau : du coquillage, aux sédiments marins, au pétrole, et enfin au plastique. Certains éléments d'apparence contradictoires sont réunis dans un même cycle. On retrouve cette logique dans phol (2008), un tissu d'acétate de cellulose rose accroché au mur et sur lequel Panchal a découpé un rond. Au sol, le disque d'un tronc d'arbre répète le cercle, comme si le bois avait été coupé dans le tissu, une manière de mettre en scène la provenance organique de la cellulose (que l'on obtient principalement à partir de la pulpe de bois). Plutôt que d'articuler l'habituelle dichotomie entre le "naturel" et le "synthétique", Panchal rétablit dans ses œuvres une filiation généalogique entre les matériaux. Cette réconciliation générationnelle ne signifie pas que Panchal soit pour autant indifférent aux questions écologiques sous-jacentes à l'utilisation de matériaux à base de plastique. L’artiste dit ne pas suivre d'agenda politique, mais son travail ne peut échapper aux débats écologiques actuels. La nature souvent imputrescible de son médium renvoie autant à l’ “immortelle" sculpture de marbre qu’à l'inquiétante intoxication progressive de la planète.

Une seconde vie

Les installations minimales de Kiaer explorent aussi la seconde vie des objets en plastique, mais l’artiste s’intéresse davantage à la fin de leur chaîne de consommation : dans Ulchiro project: pond (2007) – une série commencée à Séoul – un bloc de mousse sali est appuyé contre un mur. Dans Isandong proposal / National Fishing Competition, (2001), deux bacs à poisson en polystyrène sont installés côte à côte. Dans Endless Theatre project / Ledoux: Besançon (auditorium), (2003), le nylon d'un parapluie est étendu au sol. Ces résidus esquissent une réalité impure et crasseuse dans laquelle Mark Godfrey décèle un paradoxe essentiel à la compréhension du travail de Kiaer, à savoir "qu'une imagination débordante peut se nourrir d'un objet sale et que les rêves les plus extraordinaires peuvent naître dans le quotidien le plus miteux." Comme dans le tableau La Chute d'Icare (1555) de Pieter Bruegel, une référence importante pour lui, dans le travail de Kiaer les grandes aspirations cohabitent avec l'existence terre à terre.

La qualité des matériaux qu'utilisent Kiaer et Panchal sont certes de nature différente mais leur méthode de sélection est la même. Ils les choisissent par hasard sans suivre ni de système ni de programme déterminé (Panchal parle de "promenade"). Les deux artistes sont remarquablement ouverts aux possibilités des matériaux qu’ils rencontrent. La nature évolutive de leur production est d’ailleurs symptomatique de cette ouverture. Panchal considère l'exposition comme un temps de recherche pour tester l’interaction entre les œuvres. Les pièces de Kiaer portent souvent le mot "projet" dans leur titre pour accentuer leur statut inachevé. Pour Kiaer comme pour Panchal, une œuvre est en transformation permanente, son état n'est jamais définitif.

Surface picturale

Le titre spectaculaire HHeLiBeBCNOFNeNaMgAlSiPSClArKCaSc
TiVCrMnFeCoNiCuZnGaGeAsSeBHHeLiBeBCNOFNe
NaMgAlSiPSClArKCaScTiVCrMnFeCoNiCuZnGaGeAs
SeBrKrRbSrYZrNbMoTcRuRhPdAgCdInSnSbTeIXeCs
BaLaCePrNdPmSmEuGdTbDyHoErTmYbLuHfTaWReOsIr
PtAuHgTlPbBiPoAtRnFrRaAcThPaUNpPuAmCmBkCfEs
FmMdNoLrRfDbSgBhHsMtUunUuuUubUutUuqUupUuh
UusUuo
(2003) correspond à un dessin mural de Panchal réalisé à partir de symboles chimiques trouvés dans le tableau périodique de Mendeleïev. Cet enchevêtrement de signes superposés les uns sur les autres présente un nouvel ordre peut-être plus fidèle à l’organisation du monde : c’est un retour au chaos originel. Cette jungle de symboles est assez surprenante pour un artiste dont la pratique tend à "présenter" plutôt qu’à "représenter". Bien que ses sculptures fassent de temps en temps référence à des éléments reconnaissables (voir par exemple gaet (2008), une sorte de dolmen en polystyrène bleu), elles ont plutôt tendance à se présenter telles quelles afin de confronter le spectateur à leur matérialité et à leur histoire à peine esquissée. Les installations de Kiaer, elles, "représentent" leurs sources de façon plus explicite ; les maquettes d'architecture qu'il invente évoquent les dômes de Buckminster Fuller et les théâtres de Claude-Nicolas Ledoux. D'autres éléments viennent pourtant compromettre ces références : l’artiste s’abandonne puis résiste à la représentation directe.

Cette ambigüité est sans doute liée à la formation de peintre de Kiaer, et à sa longue relation avec ce médium. Des silhouettes empruntées aux tableaux de Bruegel ne cessent de surgir dans ses œuvres, réaffirmant son affinité avec la peinture qu'il avait pourtant failli abandonner avec l'espace tridimensionnel. Que ce soit des aquarelles ou du plastique, les pièces qu'il accroche au mur sont omniprésentes et conservent ainsi un lien fort avec la surface picturale. Dans un entretien avec Caoimhín Mac Giolla Léith, Kiaer raconte à quel point il est difficile pour lui de mettre en place un récit dans un plan unique. Son travail est une sorte de tableau dans l’espace : "ma pratique s'est déplacée au-delà du cadre". Ce croisement entre peinture et sculpture résonne également dans les récentes sculptures de Panchal. Le drap noir en polyéthylène de ptomn (2009) et le voile de polypropylène teinté au curcuma de ghelis (2009) sont si fragiles qu'ils ne peuvent tenir tout seuls, comme s’ils demandaient un mur pour les maintenir droits et visibles. On pense immédiatement au colour field painting de Barnett Newman, à Mark Rothko mais aussi à la peinture de Pierre Soulages et aux déconstructions picturales de Supports/Surfaces. De même, l'œuvre leh (2003), une toute petite flaque de pétrole brut, pourrait bien être de la matière picturale. La peinture-sculpture doit-elle s'envisager contre, avec, ou à la place de la sculpture-peinture ? Kiaer et Panchal s'opposent à toute définition de leur pratique en terme de médium. Ils viennent de traditions artistiques distinctes mais rejettent le poids de l’histoire de l’art.

Processus/résultat

Le travail de Kiaer et Panchal suscite de nombreuses interrogations sur la façon dont un visiteur non averti peut faire l'expérience d'une œuvre sans en connaître les références. La simple observation de phol suffit-elle à évoquer la production de cellulose? Comment approcher Ulchiro project: pond sans connaître le contexte actuel de la Corée ? Comme une séduisante composition? Un mystérieux assemblage ? Sans aucune information préalable, est-il réellement possible d'aller au-delà du simple plaisir formel ? Et si non, est-ce vraiment gênant ? Kiaer et Panchal sont conscients de cet écart. "C'est inévitable", explique Kiaer, "il y a aura toujours un décalage entre les intentions de mon travail et la première rencontre d'un visiteur avec mes œuvres." Quand bien même on connaîtrait les références nécessaires à la compréhension du travail de Kiaer, de nombreux éléments restent obscurs. Les deux artistes cultivent volontiers l'opacité. Faire l'expérience de leurs œuvres, c'est comme voir une pièce de théâtre dans une langue étrangère : une épreuve à la fois frustrante et libératrice dans le sens où les spectateurs peuvent eux-mêmes combler le déficit interprétatif avec leurs propres histoires, projections et fictions. Pour Kiaer et Panchal, le passage de la recherche à l’œuvre ne suit pas nécessairement un déroulement chronologique ; la cheminement intellectuelle et l’exécution formelle sont deux routes qui ne se croisent qu’occasionnellement. Leurs œuvres sont certes déconcertantes mais c'est précisément cette fragilité qui fait leur force. Elles rejettent aussi bien le soi-disant mythe de "la rencontre pure" avec une œuvre d'art immédiatement accessible sans connaissance préalable que l'idée selon laquelle l'œuvre est un texte esclave de son exégèse, un code à déchiffrer.

IMAGE CREDITS

Ian Kiaer, Ulchiro project: pond, 2007
Acrylic on linen, foam, tupperware
Installation dimensions: 190 x 105 x 19 cms / 74 3/4 x 41 3/8 x 7 1/2 ins
Courtesy the artist and Alison Jacques Gallery
Gyan Panchal, gaet, 2008
Polystyrène extrudé poncé
240 x 120 x 60 cm
Pièce unique
Courtesy Frank Elbaz

Gyan Panchal, eca, 2005
Polystyrène expansé
60 x 120 x 250 cm chaque (2 éléments)
Pièce unique
Courtesy Frank Elbaz

Gyan Panchal, phol, 2008
Acétate de cellulose, bois
247 x 154 x 77 cm
Pièce unique
Vue de l’exposition Gyan Panchal, Emba/galerie Edouard Manet, 15 mai – 14 juin 2008, Gennevilliers, France
© Galerie Edouard Manet - Gennevilliers
© Photo: Laurent Lecat
Courtesy Frank Elbaz

Ian Kiaer, , 2007
Acrylic on linen, foam, tupperware
Installation dimensions: 190 x 105 x 19 cms / 74 3/4 x 41 3/8 x 7 1/2 ins
Courtesy the artist and Alison Jacques Gallery

Ian Kiaer, Ulchiro project: pond, 2007
Acrylic on linen, foam, tupperware
Installation dimensions: 190 x 105 x 19 cms / 74 3/4 x 41 3/8 x 7 1/2 ins
Courtesy the artist and Alison Jacques Gallery

Ian Kiaer, Insadong proposal / National Fishing Competition, 2001
Polystyrene, plastic, watercolour on linen Installation dimensions variable
Courtesy the artist and Alison Jacques Gallery

Ian Kiaer, Endless Theatre Project / Ledoux: Besaçon (auditorium), 2003 5 parts: umbrella material and rubber, roofing insulation and black cloth, Korean ink on taffeta mounted on lighting gel on cotton, large football bladder, small football bladder
Installation dimensions variable
Courtesy the artist, Tanya Bonakdar Gallery, New York, and Alison Jacques Gallery, London

Gyan Panchal, HHeLiBeBCNOFNeNaMgAlSiPSClArKCaSc
TiVCrMnFeCoNiCuZnGaGeAsSeBHHeLiBeBCNOFNe
NaMgAlSiPSClArKCaScTiVCrMnFeCoNiCuZnGaGeAs
SeBrKrRbSrYZrNbMoTcRuRhPdAgCdInSnSbTeIXeCs
BaLaCePrNdPmSmEuGdTbDyHoErTmYbLuHfTaWReOsIr
PtAuHgTlPbBiPoAtRnFrRaAcThPaUNpPuAmCmBkCfEs
FmMdNoLrRfDbSgBhHsMtUunUuuUubUutUuqUupUuhUusUuo
, 2003
Marqueur noir
Dimensions variables
Pièce unique
Courtesy Frank Elbaz

Gyan Panchal, ptomn, 2009
Polyéthylène
Dimensions variables
Pièce unique
Vue de l’exposition “brick says: I like an arch”, Le SPOT, Le Havre, France, 2009
© le SPOT, Le Havre
Photo : André Morin, Paris
Courtesy Frank Elbaz

 
advertisement advertisement advertisement