artwork image
artwork image
artwork image
artwork image
artwork image
artwork image
artwork image

English

Hiraki Sawa

Inside the Box

Coline Milliard

Eight years after Hiraki Sawa's breakthrough single-channel video Dwelling (2002), Coline Milliard looks back at the prolific production of an artist who has adopted fancy as a governing principle.

'Basically, I love making stuff', says Hiraki Sawa, sitting in his neatly arranged Dalston studio. 'When I first experimented with video, it was like making objects for me. I was making things up, just like I used to with my sculptures during my BA.' Sawa's single channel projections and video installations all bear the mark of his interest in the sculptural. The black and white Dwelling (2002), realised when the artist was still a student at London's Slade School of Fine Art, is a meticulous orchestration of miniature planes jetting around Sawa's apartment. Silent and graceful, toy-sized aircrafts take off from the bedroom carpet and land, undisturbed, on the kitchen's work surface. They crowd every nook and cranny of the artist's flat, swarming like a quiet cloud of mechanical bumblebees. In this very first video piece, Sawa crammed the infinite sky into his interior, and methodically placed, as if by hand, his tiny protagonists in a filmic aquarium. Dwelling is a composition in space and of spaces, a fantastical choreography of mundane objects - and it launched the artist's career. In 2003, one year out of college, Sawa was shown at the Le Consortium-curated Lyon Biennial and taken on by both James Cohan in New York and Ota Fine Arts in Tokyo, all of these sponsors pushing the artist to develop his charmingly unsettling visual lexicon.

Once upon a plane

Perhaps as a result of this overwhelmingly positive response, Dwelling's jets soon started stacking up. In Spotter (2003), minuscule planes are attentively watched by a crowd of Lilliputian plane spotters nestled on mini balconies throughout the artist's home. They all carry walkie-talkies to pick up the signals from the control tower. Spotter is an obvious development of Dwelling, almost a sequel. It could also be a reaction against a certain type of criticism, one quick to jump to easy conclusions. Sawa was born in Japan and he lives in London; Dwelling was automatically read as a take on ideas of belonging and displacement. 'Living between cultures', wrote Gregory Volk for an exhibition at LA Hammer Museum in 2005, 'has probably resulted in a great deal of airplane travel, as well as serious questioning of what home is and means'. This reflex interpretation misses a crucial aspect of Sawa's work, namely its strong associations with the world of childhood, both remembered and fantasised. Dwelling and Spotter are less about the adult Sawa is than they are about the child he once was. 'It’s not about being on a plane', says Sawa. 'It’s about watching planes. My grandmother used to take me to the airport in my hometown to watch the planes. You know, some kids get really obsessed with things, and I was obsessed with planes.'

The obsession continued to grow. Having represented the aircraft themselves, Sawa started to work on the whiff of exoticism that billows in their trails. In Migration (2003) a puny menagerie, including horses, camels and elephants, trots along the artist's window ledge. Stark-naked humans briefly appear, half-floating above the radiators. In Elsewhere (2003), crockery, soap and toilet paper are given legs with which to slowly pace up and down the flat. Despite the enchanting poetics of these first works, Sawa's early success has been somewhat double-edged; it trapped the artist within in the limits of the flat that he himself elected as the confines of his world. 'I didn't know how to move on', he admits now.

Imagination relates to reality

The solution came from a bunch of kids during a workshop at the Hayward Gallery in 2004. Sawa asked them to build spaceships of whatever shape they liked, and to tell him why they wanted to make these objects fly. Many went for the expected silver papier maché rockets, but a few truly surprised the artist – especially the girl who wanted her bus to take off so she could avoid traffic jams, and the boy who dreamt up a flying staircase. 'I learnt from those kids', says Sawa. 'The workshop really confirmed my idea that imagination relates to reality.' The resulting film, In Here (2004), shows the children's creations floating about in space, seen through the porthole of a washing machine. Hardly ever displayed in public ('it was for the kids'), In Here nonetheless marked a pivotal moment in Sawa's production, bursting open his self-imposed spatial restrictions.

Shot in colour and set in a bourgeois English interior, the three-channel video Going Places Sitting Down (2004) exemplifies this newfound freedom. It shares with E.T.A. Hoffmann's Nutcracker (1816) and Lewis Carroll's Alice's Adventures in Wonderland (1865) an intimate logic of its own; the fantastic universe sketched in Dwelling is at last given free rein. The film starts with a wooden horse seen, like Alice's garden, through a door. It reappears, rocking gently on the fireplace. Soon a whole herd of wild wooden horses crosses the river of a dinner table’s lustrous surface before riding through the snow of a heavy cream carpet. Small, tall, the horses resurface again and again, in all sizes. And from Rabelais to Jonathan Swift, this disruption of scale - Sawa's trademark since Dwelling - has always been a recurring theme of the fabulous. It encapsulates an oscillation between childhood and adulthood. When the pubescent Alice falls down the rabbit hole, she becomes alternately minuscule and enormous, always barred from the magnificent garden she has seen on the other side of the door. This hesitation between two states is at the heart of Sawa's Going Places Sitting Down. Like in a child’s daydream, the bath is a tempestuous river, the leathery book spines in the family library an African mountain - all of them safely located in the house's very real cosy interior.

Hako

Sawa's latest pieces have abandoned this last vestige of security. The artist says he is fascinated by the work of the Swiss psychotherapist Dora M.Kalff on sandplay therapy, in which the patient is given a sandbox and toys, and asked to make up a landscape – in the process exteriorising a mental state through the creation of an environment in which all the elements can be controlled. 'I really wanted to try and see what would come out', says the artist, 'but instead of sand I used video'. Hako (2006) – ‘box’ in Japanese - came out of this experiment. For the first time Sawa left the confined spaces that have been his exclusive settings since Dwelling for an indefinite seaside. Ditching the interiors, Sawa cuts off his connections with the real. 'I visually moved out', he says, 'but mentally the piece went in even further.' Absurd and out of place, an ornate doll’s house is the last trace of domesticity, a tweaked and disturbing abstraction of a home, reminiscent of Joseph Cornell's boxed assemblages.

Over the last eight years, Sawa has conquered new spaces, furthering the conceptual and spatial boundaries he so deliberately constructs for his videos. Since 2007, his works have also expanded into the three-dimensional. The second version of Hako (2007) unfurls over six screens, successively discovered by the viewer. Seeing the piece is an adventure in Sawaland. The artist claims to 'understand time as a physical object', and his multi-channel projections allowed him to add an extra layer of temporality intimately linked to the viewer's own experience. In Hako, as in Sawa's latest piece - the thirteen-channel installation O (2009) - the screens function as peepholes offering partial views of a universe not graspable all at once. Or so it seems: 'each part of the work contains everything', affirms Sawa, whimsically. Each of his works may well also contain everything; they progressively map out a fantastical world in constant expansion.

Hiraki Sawa, Carrousel
18/06/2010 - 26/09/2010
Frac Franche-Comté
Besançon, France
www.frac-franche-comte.fr

IMAGE CREDITS

Hiraki Sawa, Going Places Sitting Down, 2004
Three channel video installation, stereo
Bloomburg + Hayward gallery commission
Copyright Hiraki Sawa

Hiraki Sawa, Dwelling, 2002
Single channel video, stereo
Copyright Hiraki Sawa

Hiraki Sawa, Spotter, 2003
Single channel video, stereo
Copyright Hiraki Sawa

Hiraki Sawa, Going Places Sitting Down, 2004
Three channel video installation, stereo
Bloomburg + Hayward gallery commission
Copyright Hiraki Sawa

Hiraki Sawa, Hako, 2006
Single channel video, stereo
Copyright Hiraki Sawa

Hiraki Sawa, Hako, 2007
Six channel video installation, 5 channel sound
Installation photograph: Natasha Harth Courtesy Queensland Art Gallery, Brisbane / Australia
Copyright Hiraki Sawa

Hiraki Sawa, O, 2009
Thirteen channel video installation 5 channel sound
Copyright Hiraki Sawa

Français

Hiraki Sawa

C'est dans la boîte

Coline Milliard

Il y a huit ans, la vidéo Dwelling (2002) d'Hiraki Sawa connaît un succès fulgurant. Coline Milliard revient sur la production prolifique d'un artiste qui travaille en prise directe avec son imaginaire.

"J'aime fabriquer des choses", m’explique Hiraki Sawa, assis dans son atelier à Dalston, au nord-est de Londres. "Quand j'ai commencé à faire de la vidéo, j'avais l'impression de produire des objets, j’inventais, comme dans les sculptures du début de mes études." Les projections vidéo de Sawa sont très proches de la sculpture, un vocabulaire plastique qu'il affectionne tout particulièrement. À la Slade School of Fine Art de Londres, l'artiste réalise Dwelling (2002), un film en noir et blanc dans lequel il orchestre méticuleusement un trafic aérien d'avions miniatures en plein vol dans son appartement. Sur la moquette de sa chambre, de gracieux avions décollent sans bruit pour atterrir paisiblement dans la cuisine, sur le plan de travail. Une nuée de petits engins volants, nichés dans les moindres coins et recoins de l'appartement, se déplace tel un essaim d'abeilles mécaniques. Dans ce tout premier film, Sawa invente un cinéma aquarium dans lequel on imagine un marionnettiste capable de faire rentrer le ciel infini dans sa chambre et manipulant de mini-protagonistes à sa guise. Cette chorégraphie féerique de petits objets quotidiens est une mise en espace d'espaces – et le film fait décoller la carrière de l'artiste. En 2003, un an après la fin de ses études, Sawa expose déjà à la Biennale de Lyon (organisée par Le Consortium) et James Cohan représente son travail à New York. La même année, il entame également une collaboration avec Ota Fine Arts à Tokyo, un succès qui l'encourage à développer son vocabulaire d'images déroutantes aussi bien que séduisantes.

Il était un avion

Peut-être une conséquence de la popularité de Dwelling, les avions envahissent alors le travail de l'artiste. Dans Spotter (2003), il amasse une foule de Lilliputiens, perchés sur des mini-balcons dans son appartement, qui observent attentivement le passage de minuscules avions. Ils sont tous équipés de talkies-walkies pour capter les fréquences d'une tour de contrôle de l'aéroport d'Heathrow. Spotter est une œuvre dans la continuité logique de Dwelling, presque une suite. L'artiste cherchait sans doute aussi à déjouer un discours critique friand d'interprétations faciles. Sawa est né au Japon et il vit à Londres. Dwelling a tout de suite été vu comme une œuvre sur le sentiment d'appartenance et de déracinement. À l'occasion de son exposition au Hammer Museum de Los Angeles, Gregory Volk écrit : "Vivre entre deux cultures a probablement entraîné de nombreux voyages en avion qui ont nourri sa réflexion intense sur ce que signifie être 'chez soi'." Cette conclusion vite tirée écarte une dimension cruciale du travail de Sawa, à savoir son rapport intime avec l'enfance, souvenirs réels ou imaginaires. Ce n'est pas Sawa adulte que l’on retrouve dans Dwelling et Spotter, mais bien Sawa enfant. "Mon travail ne parle pas de mes voyages en avion, explique-t-il, mais plutôt de mon observation de leur passage dans le ciel depuis que je suis tout petit. Ma grand-mère m'amenait à l'aéroport de ma ville natale pour les regarder. Les gamins ont tous une obsession. Moi, c'était les avions."

Cette obsession n'a depuis cessé de grandir, et Sawa passe progressivement de la représentation des avions aux connotations exotiques qu'ils laissent sur leur passage. Migration (2003) est une petite ménagerie de fortune composée de chevaux, chameaux et éléphants qui trottent sur le rebord de la fenêtre chez l'artiste. Quelques personnages dénudés apparaissent flottant à moitié sur le radiateur. Dans Elsewhere (2003), ustensiles, savon et papier toilette sur pattes arpentent l'appartement de bas en haut. Le charme de ces premières œuvres lui vaut un succès prématuré à double tranchant : l'artiste se retrouve piégé entre quatre murs, dans cet appartement qu'il avait lui-même choisi comme espace de liberté. "Je ne savais plus comment en sortir", admet-il aujourd’hui.

En prise directe avec le réel

La réponse est sortie tout droit de la bouche des enfants à l'occasion d'un atelier à la Hayward Gallery en 2004. Sawa leur demande de fabriquer des vaisseaux spatiaux de n'importe quelle forme et de lui expliquer pourquoi ils veulent les faire voler. La plupart optent pour un classique, la fusée argentée en papier mâché, mais quelques-uns surprennent l'artiste. Une petite fille veut faire décoller son bus pour éviter les embouteillages et un autre petit garçon choisit de faire voler des escaliers. "J'ai beaucoup appris grâce à ces enfants, dit Sawa. Cette expérience m'a conforté dans mon idée que l'imagination est en prise directe avec le réel." Un film naît de cette rencontre, In here (2004). Depuis le hublot de la machine à laver, on observe les objets fabriqués par les enfants flotter dans l'espace. Le film n'a quasiment jamais été montré en public (‘c'était pour les mômes’), mais marque toutefois un tournant dans l'œuvre de Sawa, libérée des limites spatiales qu’il s’était lui-même imposées.

Filmée dans un intérieur anglais bourgeois, la triple projection vidéo Going Places Sitting Down (2004) incarne cette liberté fraîchement conquise. L'univers intime du film possède sa propre logique interne à la manière de Casse-noisette (1816) d'E.T.A Hoffmann et d’Alice au pays des merveilles (1865) de Lewis Carroll. L'artiste donne enfin libre cours au monde fantastique qu'il avait instauré dans Dwelling. Au début du film, un cheval en bois apparaît derrière une porte, comme le jardin d'Alice. Celui-ci réapparaît et bascule au pied d'une cheminée. Très vite, une horde de chevaux en bois traverse une rivière sur la surface brillante de la table à manger et galope dans la neige sur la moquette épaisse couleur crème. Le cheval refait surface, encore et encore, parfois petit, parfois grand, dans toutes les tailles. De Rabelais à Jonathan Swift, le genre fantastique a traditionnellement recours aux jeux d'échelles, une marque de fabrique dont Sawa s'est emparée depuis Dwelling. Perturber les échelles, c'est aussi basculer sans cesse entre le monde de l'enfance et le monde adulte. Tombée au fond du terrier, Alice devient tout à tour énorme et minuscule, à chaque fois incapable d’entrer dans le sublime jardin qu'elle aperçoit de l'autre côté de la porte. Cet état d'incertitude permanent est au cœur de Going Places Sitting Down. Sous l'emprise d'une rêverie enfantine, le bain se transforme en une rivière agitée et la tranche ferme des livres rangés dans la bibliothèque familiale, une montagne en Afrique ; mais tout reste protégé par l'intérieur cosy de la maison familiale.

Hako

Les dernières œuvres de Sawa ont fini par abandonner cet univers domestique. L'artiste se dit fasciné par la découverte d'une thérapie par le jeu de sable mise au point par la psychothérapeute suisse Dora M.Kalff et qui consiste à donner au patient un bac à sable et des jouets pour construire un paysage. Le patient extériorise alors sa souffrance en créant un environnement dont il contrôle tous les éléments. "J'avais envie de voir ce que cela pourrait donner, raconte l'artiste, mais plutôt que de prendre du sable, j'ai utilisé la vidéo." Hako (2006), la boîte en japonais, est le résultat de cette expérience. Pour la première fois, Sawa quitte l'espace confiné qui était devenu son lieu de prédilection pour un paysage infini, le bord de mer. En abandonnant les intérieurs, Sawa perd définitivement tout lien avec le réel. "J'ai complètement changé d'univers visuel et je suis mentalement allé encore plus loin." Une maison de poupée absurde, parachutée sur la plage, est la seule trace de l'univers domestique de l'artiste, le film abstrait et étrange évoque les boîtes-assemblages de Joseph Cornell.

En huit ans, Sawa a su conquérir de nouveaux espaces et s'affranchir des limites spatiales et mentales qu'il avait établies de façon si rigide dans ses vidéos. Depuis 2007, ses œuvres ont aussi peu à peu investi l'espace tridimensionnel de l'exposition. La seconde version de Hako (2007) se déploie sur six écrans, c’est une balade dans le monde de Sawa. "Le temps est un objet que je conçois dans toute sa matérialité," explique l’artiste. Multiplier les écrans de projection lui a permis de complexifier la temporalité de son œuvre et l'expérience du visiteur. On regarde les écrans de Hako (de même que les 13 projections de sa dernière installation, O, 2009) comme on regarderait à travers le trou d'une porte pour y voir un monde fragmenté, inaccessible dans son ensemble. "Chaque partie de l'œuvre est un tout", affirme pourtant Sawa. On pourrait même aller jusqu'à considérer chacune de ses œuvres comme une totalité, la cartographie d'un monde en constante expansion.

Hiraki Sawa, Carrousel
18/06/2010 - 26/09/2010
Frac Franche-Comté
Besançon, France
www.frac-franche-comte.fr

IMAGE CREDITS

Hiraki Sawa, Going Places Sitting Down, 2004
Three channel video installation, stereo
Bloomburg + Hayward gallery commission
Copyright Hiraki Sawa

Hiraki Sawa, Dwelling, 2002
Single channel video, stereo
Copyright Hiraki Sawa

Hiraki Sawa, Spotter, 2003
Single channel video, stereo
Copyright Hiraki Sawa

Hiraki Sawa, Going Places Sitting Down, 2004
Three channel video installation, stereo
Bloomburg + Hayward gallery commission
Copyright Hiraki Sawa

Hiraki Sawa, Hako, 2006
Single channel video, stereo
Copyright Hiraki Sawa

Hiraki Sawa, Hako, 2007
Six channel video installation, 5 channel sound
Installation photograph: Natasha Harth Courtesy Queensland Art Gallery, Brisbane / Australia
Copyright Hiraki Sawa

Hiraki Sawa, O, 2009
Thirteen channel video installation 5 channel sound
Copyright Hiraki Sawa

 
advertisement advertisement advertisement