artwork image
artwork image
artwork image
artwork image
artwork image
artwork image
artwork image
artwork image

English

Exhibition Memory

The 2005 Baltic Triennial: BMW – Black Market Worlds

Francesco Manacorda

Magazines are full of ‘current stories’, shows about to happen or just finished, but how does it feel to think about an exhibition experienced a while ago? What remains of that experience? Knowing his interest in the history of exhibitions, Catalogue invited Francesco Manacorda, curator at London’s Barbican Art Gallery, to remember one exhibition. He chose the 2005 Baltic Triennial BMW – Black Market Worlds at the CAC Contemporary Art Centre in Vilnius, Lithuania. The remembering process being selective and purely subjective, Catalogue cannot guarantee the authenticity of the facts below.

I have done a couple of lectures on BMW, but I have deliberately decided not to go back to my notes here. I’m interested in how remembering an exhibition might mean distorting facts. When I mentioned this possibility to Raimundas Malasauskas – one of the Triennial’s curators – he was very pleased because it echoed the exhibition itself, which involved a lot of rumours. Taking the black market as a starting point, the works on display mirrored its multi-layered structure and secrecy. They referred to underground economic systems, hidden networks of information, esotericism and paranormal activities. All those themes were part of the praxis of the exhibition itself, so you couldn’t possibly have a straight approach to it. Everything was coded. I remember Raimundas giving us a guided tour pretending he was somebody else. He was talking in a deadpan tone saying things he might not even agree with. Even later when I was asking him for facts, he would always reply, ‘people say that this happened …’.

“In the CAC’s monumental modernist exhibition hall, a local architect had used the projected shadows of the building to create structural black curtain ‘walls’.”

I went twice to see the show and spent a lot of time there. In my memory, the exhibition is more black and white than colour. There was no real circuit so you could have missed a lot of works, it was the curators’ intention to hide things. In the CAC’s monumental modernist exhibition hall, a local architect had used the projected shadows of the building to create structural black curtain ‘walls’. These shadow walls produced more intimate rooms so that small and anti-monumental works would not disappear completely. It created the most perfect atmosphere to experience them. The black curtains were also used as a support for typographic interventions, and to hang pictures such as Melvin Moti’s poster showing the first photograph ever taken of a ghost.

The atmosphere was serious but also tongue-in-cheek, many works were dealing with ghosts and paranormal activities without taking the subject very seriously. A local artist, Juozas Laivys, took a wild boar’s head from another museum, looked at how it was classified and recontextualised it in the CAC exhibition space, conjuring like a ghost the whole museum it had left. Joachim Koester had several pieces dotted around the space investigating Aleister Crowley’s mystic community in a house in Southern Italy. A lot of works involved rituals. Joe Scanlan did a coffin for himself with Ikea furniture, went into the forest to bury it for a while, then brought it back to the gallery. The investigation of paranormal and alternative realities went beyond the exhibition space. Loris Gréaud and Gabriel Lester did a work during a flight so all the passengers would fall asleep at a certain stage without knowing they were performing a piece.

While I was in Vilnius, I had a fantastic experience that enlightened me as to the nature of the exhibition. Raimundas was still living there and he was running a guest-house just by the CAC, a sort of Warholian curatorial factory. We decided to do a big dinner and went to the market to buy ingredients. Raimundas would buy things from the stalls, he would talk, shake hands and then something which was not visible at first would appear and he would buy it. I felt that the whole exhibition was organised on this principle. You had to push behind normal negotiations and linguistic conventions of exhibition-making to find hidden things or learn a new language which allowed the work to deliver something you hadn’t seen in the first place.

“The concerns of the works were also explored within the curatorial and museological structure, and I thought that was one of the most incredible ways of making an exhibition.”

I was very curious to see the exhibition as I had already followed the website and the e-flux announcements giving contradictory information. All the ideas the artists brought to the table were imported from every single department of the CAC. From marketing to education, they would all give divergent statements of what was happening. The press department issued three different press releases written in different styles saying different things about the show. Same thing with the gallery guide and the catalogue which was made of five boxes containing five different books. In a regular museum, no one from the press or marketing department would ever accept this. The concerns of the works were also explored within the curatorial and museological structure, and I thought that was one of the most incredible ways of making an exhibition. This ability to infiltrate the ideological system of the museum really inspired me and had a great influence on the exhibition I curated for the Barbican Art Gallery, Martian Museum of Terrestrial Art.

I once gave a lecture on models of collaboration between artists and curators at the OCA Office for Contemporary Art Norway in Oslo. I was comparing BMW to Harald Szeemann’s 1976 exhibition Les Machines Célibataires (The Bachelor Machines) and Independent Group’s 1956 exhibition This is Tomorrow at the Whitechapel. In these three cases, the final message of the exhibition is a joined enunciation between the artistic and the curatorial voices. The dialogue with an artist is amplified and repeated within the curatorial strategy. It is not stealing from the artist but using similar techniques to create a resonance, like a violin’s room resonance, which amplifies the work or makes it sound more precise. I’m interested in exhibitions that allow the work to shout louder.

IXth Baltic Triennial of International Art, BMW - Black Market Worlds
CAC Contemporary Art Center, Vilnius
23 September – 20 November 2005

Artists: Alex Bag, Pablo Leon de la Barra, Ross Cisneros, Roberto Cuoghi, Brice Dellsperger, Bernadeta Levule, DJ Jimi Lopez, Christelle Lheureux & Apichatpong Weerasethakul, Daniel Bozhkov, David Küenzi, Deimantas Narkevicius, Deric Carner, Donelle Woolford, Drum Ecstasy, Emily Cullman, Gabriel Lester, Gintaras Makarevicius, Hinrich Sachs, Ignacio Gonzalez Lang, Ion Grigorescu, Mrzyk & Moriceau, Jeppe Hein, Joachim Koester, Jonathan Monk, Juozas Laivys, Karl Holmqvist, Kyle McCallum, Loris Greaud, Maaike Gottschal & Natascha Hagenbee, Mariana Castillo Deball, Mario Garcia Torres, Markus Schinwald, Matthieu Laurette, Melvin Moti, Mindaugas Lukoaitis, Olivia Plender, Reena Spaulings, Rene Gabri, Teresa Margolles, Vidya Gastaldon, Arturas Raila, Joe Scanlan, Jochen Schmith, Bruno Serralongue, Sean Snyder, Laura Stasiulyto, Cara Tolmie, Mirjam Wirz.
Curators: Sofia Hernandez Chong Cuy, Raimundas Malasauskas, Alexis Vaillant.

http://vilniusburning.lt

IMAGE CREDITS

Vidya Gastaldon, Melvin Moti, Reena Spaulings, Joachim Koester, Jonathan Monk, BMW – The IX Baltic Triennial of International Art, Contemporary Art Center (CAC) Vilnius, 2005. Courtesy: the artists and CAC Vilnius.

Maaike Gottschal & Natascha Hagenbeek, Artūras Raila, Vidya Gastaldon, BMW – The IX Baltic Triennial of International Art, Contemporary Art Center (CAC) Vilnius, 2005. Courtesy: the artists and CAC Vilnius.

Loris Gréaud, BMW – The IX Baltic Triennial of International Art, Contemporary Art Center (CAC) Vilnius, 2005. Courtesy: the artists and CAC Vilnius.

Laura Stasiulytė, Sean Snyder, BMW – The IX Baltic Triennial of International Art, Contemporary Art Center (CAC) Vilnius, 2005. Courtesy: the artists and CAC Vilnius.

Melvon Moti, BMW – The IX Baltic Triennial of International Art, Contemporary Art Center (CAC) Vilnius, 2005. Courtesy: the artists and CAC Vilnius.

Juozas Laivys, David Küenzi, Maaike Gottschal & Natascha Hagenbeek, BMW – The IX Baltic Triennial of International Art, Contemporary Art Center (CAC) Vilnius, 2005. Courtesy: the artists and CAC Vilnius.

Christelle Lheureux & Apichatpong Weerasethakul, BMW – The IX Baltic Triennial of International Art, Contemporary Art Center (CAC) Vilnius, 2005. Courtesy: the artists and CAC Vilnius.

Joachim Koester, Markus Schinwald, Teresa Margolles, BMW – The IX Baltic Triennial of International Art, Contemporary Art Center (CAC) Vilnius, 2005. Courtesy: the artists and CAC Vilnius.

Français

L'exposition différée

La Triennale baltique de 2005: BMW – Black Market Worlds

Francesco Manacorda

Les revues d'art rendent souvent compte d'expositions sur le point d'ouvrir ou de s'achever. Le récit demeure d'actualité, encore imprégné de sa récente visite. Catalogue a voulu tenter l'expérience inverse: une chronique d'exposition en différé qui, plusieurs années après, aurait subi les altérations de la mémoire. Que garde-t-on de l'expérience d'une exposition? Francesco Manacorda, passionné de l'histoire de l'exposition et commissaire au Barbican, s'est livré à l'exercice en choisissant la Triennale baltique de 2005, BMW - Black Market Worlds, au CAC (Centre d'Art Contemporain) de Vilnius, Lituanie. Le processus de sélection de la mémoire étant purement subjectif, Catalogue ne peut garantir l’authenticité des informations contenues dans ce texte.

J'ai donné quelques conférences sur BMW et j'ai volontairement décidé de ne pas relire mes notes. Tout l'intérêt de l'exercice, selon moi, repose sur la capacité (ou l'incapacité) de ma mémoire à reconstituer l'expérience de cette exposition. Quand j'ai prévenu Raimundas Malasauskas, l'un des trois commissaires de BMW, que des erreurs allaient certainement s'infiltrer dans mes souvenirs, il a tout de suite été ravi car la triennale jouait justement sur l'idée de rumeur. Les œuvres fonctionnaient sur le même modèle que le marché noir : des systèmes économiques alternatifs aux piratages d'information en passant par l'ésotérisme et les phénomènes paranormaux, tout se négociait sous terre, en secret. La méthodologie de l'exposition avait d'ailleurs détourné ses propres règles pour emprunter les mêmes chemins de traverse. Tout était codé. Je me souviens d'une visite guidée de Raimundas qui s'était mis dans la peau d'un autre pour nous raconter des histoires improbables. À chaque fois que j'essayais d'obtenir la vérité, il restait de marbre et me répondait "Les gens disent que ça s'est passé..."

“Un architecte de Vilnius était intervenu sur la scénographie du CAC en reprenant les ombres projetées du bâtiment. Il en a fait de grands rideaux noirs qui découpaient parfaitement l'espace.”

Je suis venu deux fois visiter l'exposition, j'y ai passé beaucoup de temps. Mes souvenirs de BMW sont plus en noir et blanc qu'en couleur. Il n'y avait aucun parcours imposé, on pouvait facilement se perdre et rater des œuvres. C'était ce que souhaitaient les commissaires. Un architecte de Vilnius était intervenu sur la scénographie du CAC en reprenant les ombres projetées du bâtiment. Il en a fait de grands rideaux noirs qui découpaient parfaitement l'espace. Des pièces plus intimes, délimitées par ces "murs d'ombre", évitaient aux œuvres plus discrètes de se noyer dans l'architecture moderniste et monumentale du lieu. L'atmosphère était très agréable. Les rideaux noirs avaient aussi servi à la présentation de créations graphiques et comme support d'accrochage, notamment une affiche de Melvin Moti qui reproduisait la toute première photographie d'un spectre.

L'ambiance était à la fois grave et légère, même les œuvres qui évoquaient les fantômes et autres phénomènes paranormaux ne se prenaient pas réellement au sérieux. Un artiste de Vilnius, Juozas Laivys, avait emprunté une tête de sanglier dans un musée et l'avait recontextualisée dans l'espace du CAC, une façon d'incarner l'esprit de son musée d'origine. L'œuvre de Joachim Koester sur la communauté mystique d'Aleister Crowley au sud de l'Italie ponctuait l'espace. Le rituel était au cœur de la pratique de nombreux artistes exposés. Joe Scanlan avait fabriqué son propre cercueil avec des meubles Ikea. Il l'avait enterré dans la forêt, puis ramené dans l'espace d'exposition. L'intervention de Loris Gréaud et Gabriel Lester avait eu lieu dans un avion en plein vol. Au même moment, tous les passagers s'étaient endormis sans savoir qu'ils participaient à une œuvre.

Lors de mon séjour à Vilnius, j'ai vécu une expérience fantastique qui m'a beaucoup éclairé sur le sens de l'exposition. À l'époque, Raimundas vivait dans une maison juste à côté du CAC, une sorte de Factory à la Warhol. Nous avons eu l'idée d'organiser un grand repas et sommes allés au marché faire les courses. À chaque fois qu'il réglait un article, il se mettait à discuter avec le vendeur, lui serrait la main et soudain, quelque chose qui n'était pas visible sur l'étalage apparaissait et il l'achetait. C'est là que j'ai vraiment compris comment l'exposition avait été conçue. Il fallait d'abord en passer par un premier niveau de négociation, décoder les conventions, assimiler un nouveau vocabulaire pour ensuite découvrir ce qui se cachait derrière les œuvres.

“La structure curatoriale et muséographique de la triennale parlait la même langue que les œuvres. Elles avaient réussi à infiltrer le système idéologique de l'institution et j'avais trouvé ça incroyable.”

J'étais vraiment impatient de découvrir la triennale. J'avais suivi tous les emails d'e-flux qui annonçaient des informations contradictoires. La stratégie que les artistes employaient dans leurs œuvres avait été reprise au sein même de la structure du CAC. De la communication à la médiation, chaque département avait sa propre version des faits. Le département presse avait diffusé trois communiqués de nature différente. Même chose pour le guide de l'exposition et le catalogue, il y avait cinq boîtes et cinq ouvrages différents. Je doute que le chargé de presse ou de médiation d'un musée traditionnel eût joué le jeu. La structure curatoriale et muséographique de la triennale parlait la même langue que les œuvres. Elles avaient réussi à infiltrer le système idéologique de l'institution et j'avais trouvé ça incroyable. BMW m'a beaucoup inspiré pour mon exposition Martian Museum of Terrestrial Art au Barbican quelques années plus tard.

À l'occasion d'une conférence à l'OCA (Office for Contemporary Art) d'Oslo, j'ai tenté de comparer différents modes de collaboration entre artistes et commissaires: BMW faisait partie de mon corpus d'expositions aux côtés des Machines Célibataires (1976) d'Harald Szeemann et This is Tomorrow (1956) de The Independent Group à la Whitechapel. Dans les trois cas, l'exposition chante à deux voix : la voix artistique est reprise et amplifiée par la voix curatoriale. Ce n'est pas du vol, ce sont simplement des stratégies qui s'imitent pour créer une caisse de résonance, comme dans un violon. Une fois amplifiée, l'œuvre sonne plus fort, plus juste. Les expositions qui parviennent à percevoir cette justesse me passionnent.

IXth Baltic Triennial of International Art, BMW - Black Market Worlds
CAC - Contemporary Art Center, Vilnius
23 septembre - 20 novembre 2005

Artistes: Alex Bag, Pablo Leon de la Barra, Ross Cisneros, Roberto Cuoghi, Brice Dellsperger, Bernadeta Levule, DJ Jimi Lopez, Christelle Lheureux & Apichatpong Weerasethakul, Daniel Bozhkov, David Küenzi, Deimantas Narkevicius, Deric Carner, Donelle Woolford, Drum Ecstasy, Emily Cullman, Gabriel Lester, Gintaras Makarevicius, Hinrich Sachs, Ignacio Gonzalez Lang, Ion Grigorescu, Mrzyk & Moriceau, Jeppe Hein, Joachim Koester, Jonathan Monk, Juozas Laivys, Karl Holmqvist, Kyle McCallum, Loris Greaud, Maaike Gottschal & Natascha Hagenbee, Mariana Castillo Deball, Mario Garcia Torres, Markus Schinwald, Matthieu Laurette, Melvin Moti, Mindaugas Lukoaitis, Olivia Plender, Reena Spaulings, Rene Gabri, Teresa Margolles, Vidya Gastaldon, Arturas Raila, Joe Scanlan, Jochen Schmith, Bruno Serralongue, Sean Snyder, Laura Stasiulyto, Cara Tolmie, Mirjam Wirz
Commissaires: Sofia Hernandez Chong Cuy, Raimundas Malasauskas, Alexis Vaillant

http://vilniusburning.lt

IMAGE CREDITS

Vidya Gastaldon, Melvin Moti, Reena Spaulings, Joachim Koester, Jonathan Monk, BMW – The IX Baltic Triennial of International Art, Contemporary Art Center (CAC) Vilnius, 2005. Courtesy: the artists and CAC Vilnius.

Maaike Gottschal & Natascha Hagenbeek, Artūras Raila, Vidya Gastaldon, BMW – The IX Baltic Triennial of International Art, Contemporary Art Center (CAC) Vilnius, 2005. Courtesy: the artists and CAC Vilnius.

Loris Gréaud, BMW – The IX Baltic Triennial of International Art, Contemporary Art Center (CAC) Vilnius, 2005. Courtesy: the artists and CAC Vilnius.

Laura Stasiulytė, Sean Snyder, BMW – The IX Baltic Triennial of International Art, Contemporary Art Center (CAC) Vilnius, 2005. Courtesy: the artists and CAC Vilnius.

Melvon Moti, BMW – The IX Baltic Triennial of International Art, Contemporary Art Center (CAC) Vilnius, 2005. Courtesy: the artists and CAC Vilnius.

Juozas Laivys, David Küenzi, Maaike Gottschal & Natascha Hagenbeek, BMW – The IX Baltic Triennial of International Art, Contemporary Art Center (CAC) Vilnius, 2005. Courtesy: the artists and CAC Vilnius.

Christelle Lheureux & Apichatpong Weerasethakul, BMW – The IX Baltic Triennial of International Art, Contemporary Art Center (CAC) Vilnius, 2005. Courtesy: the artists and CAC Vilnius.

Joachim Koester, Markus Schinwald, Teresa Margolles, BMW – The IX Baltic Triennial of International Art, Contemporary Art Center (CAC) Vilnius, 2005. Courtesy: the artists and CAC Vilnius.

 
advertisement advertisement advertisement