artwork image
artwork image
artwork image
artwork image
artwork image
artwork image
artwork image

English

David Lamelas

Lexicon

Coline Milliard

Argentinean-born, US-based David Lamelas has been a key figure of the conceptual avant-garde since the 1960s. Over the last forty-five years the artist has developed a multifarious practice working with films, performances and installations – some of which he recently started to revisit, like the 1966 Conexión de tres espacios to be shown in May at London’s Bloomberg SPACE. For this interview Coline Milliard submitted six key words to Lamelas, to which the artist added his own; these terms functioned as prompts in a conversation that took them from Buenos Aires to London through Venice and Paris.

Coline Milliard: IMMATERIAL
David Lamelas: Void, Aleph

Several of your pieces embody a desire to dematerialise the artwork. How do you relate this approach to your forthcoming exhibition at London’s Bloomberg SPACE?

The piece I’m showing at Bloomberg SPACE is a re-thinking of a work I made in Buenos Aires at the Di Tella Institute for their national prize in 1966. It was called Connection of three spaces (Conexión de tres espacios). In the jury that year was Otto Hahn, who was the editor of the magazine VH 101. He absolutely loved my piece. It was a little bit too abstract for the other members of the jury, so I didn’t get the first prize but I got the special prize.

At the time, I was concerned with the fact that when you look at an artwork, you see it all at once. Imagine, for example, looking at a Henry Moore sculpture or at a Picasso painting, you can see it all in one glance. I wanted to make a work that would demand a mental construction to be understood. So I installed my piece in three different rooms. As you would go from room to room, you would accumulate the information, and only at the end could you have a mental image of the whole work. It’s exactly like when you read a book: you read it page by page but at the end of the book you have it all in your mind.

In the last room of Conexión de tres espacios, there was nothing. The piece disappeared. This was a very site-specific installation, something that didn’t really exist at the time. If you look at, say, American minimalism, it’s still very much like a Henry Moore: self-contained. And I wanted to go further than that. I’m reconsidering this piece at Bloomberg SPACE because the venue has some of the characteristics of the Di Tella space. It’s a scattered space, not a clearly defined gallery space, and that gave me the idea to reunite it with one work.

C.M: INFORMATION
D.L: I do try to free myself of any information at the moment of inventing my work

You’ve been investigating the concept of information in your work for years, perhaps most famously in your installation Office of information about the Vietnam War at Three Levels: The Visual Image, Text and Audio shown at the 1968 Venice Biennale. Are you interested in the way information is broadcast and distributed today with new media like the Internet?

The phenomenon of information has existed since the human race became conscious of itself. It’s not just the Internet or the new technologies; there are many other ways of communication, like eyesight for example. I’m not just interested in media information. I’m interested in all sorts of information – human information.

But you’ve also been specifically dealing with news.

Yes, I always have been. As a child, I remember being fascinated by my father reading the newspaper every day at lunchtime. And in my first ever solo exhibition I showed paintings of the French-Argentinean tango singer Carlos Gardel, a pop star of the time. I had picked up a newspaper with an image of him and that’s how I got the inspiration for the work. I’ve always been very inspired by the media, but it took me years to become intellectually conscious of it – until perhaps I became aware of Structuralism in France and of people like Roland Barthes. Around that time, Marshall McLuhan was also a very important figure. All these things had a big impact on me and I started to use information as my artwork.

C.M: LONDON
D.L: My Lovely

In 1968, I was invited to represent Argentina at the Venice Biennale and I made Office of information about the Vietnam War. I had chosen the Vietnam War because it was the most important subject of the moment, but what really interested me then was how news travelled from one place to another. I was in Argentina but I knew about what was happening in Vietnam through the news. A journalist in Vietnam wrote a text about what was going on, sent it to the newspaper and the newspaper sent it to me. That’s what I was interested in: how this information got to me.

From Italy, I went to London after a stopover in Paris, don’t forget that it was the end of May 1968 and that was really important. When I arrived in the UK, I had some informational baggage that the British artists didn’t have yet. They were still beholden to the so-called British sculpture of the ‘60s. It was only the very beginning of British Conceptualism – we’re talking of people like Victor Burgin, Keith Arnatt, Gilbert & George, etc. By coincidence of time and space, we all ended up together and we all wanted to get rid of the physical object in art.

C.M: PARIS
D.L: Structural Thinking, Nouveau Roman

When I was in England I was travelling to Paris at least once a month. I had a lot of friends there, and many of them were very involved with the group around the Structuralist movement and the magazine Tel Quel. One of the first things I used to do when I got to Paris was to go to La Hune (an independent bookshop in Saint-Germain-des-Prés) and study what had just been published. It was like going to university in a way. I was getting all the information that I later used in my artworks and I brought it back to the UK. This is how I function: I accumulate information and then I produce a piece. The works at that time had strict rules: on a piece of paper, I had written a dogma and when I had a concept, I had to somehow follow my own rules.

C.M: CONCEPTUAL ART
D.L: Thinking process …

In my case, this process began very early: when, as an art student, I started paying attention to the work of Cezanne and Juan Gris and their ‘conceptualisation’ of the canvas. Then I made a huge jump with the discovery of Marcel Duchamp and Alberto Greco that I encountered in Buenos Aires – and the process of dematerialization and conceptualisation of the work of art became my main concern around the mid-60s. When I moved to England in the late 60s and visited Belgium (where I met Marcel Broodthaers and Daniel Buren) I realised that my thinking process, like other Argentinean artists’, had correlations with those of these European artists. The IDEA was the important element, not the ‘object in itself’... soon after that I met Lawrence Weiner and John Baldessari ... and the rest is history.

C.M: FICTION
D.L: Part of the truth

I think fiction is highly related to reality, to whatever we do every day. It’s a survival tool. When you get up in the morning, you look at the mirror, and somehow you see yourself as the fictional person you feel you are inside. That’s a phenomenon of fiction. And the person that comes out in the street is not the same person as the one that left the bed in the morning. That phenomenon of self-construction is related to fiction – but that fiction is truth as well. Fiction and reality are entangled.

Did you feel like the series of photographs Antwerp (1969), clinically documenting Antwerp’s urban life, or London Friends (1973), in which you had your friends shot by a professional fashion photographer, were a fictionalisation of your direct environment?

These were a denial of fiction. In films like 18 Paris (1970), the idea was to present the world exactly as it was. But when I first saw these works, I realised that they had some aspects of fiction in them. It was unavoidable. When I came to the United States in 1978, I saw immediately how closely fiction was related to American politics – and that involved the phenomenon of changing information, of manipulating information, and somehow of fictionalising information. I say the US, but this is true worldwide at the moment. And political information is completely distorted according to the country you are in. Being a foreigner everywhere, I’ve always had the privilege of accumulating information from other places. For example, when I left Argentina, Che Guevara was a hero. In France, he was a hero. When I arrived in the US, he was a criminal. That really made me realise how everything depends on the point of view from which you look at it.

IMAGE CREDITS

David Lamelas, Conexión de tres espacios, 1966
Installation view in Premio Nacional
Instituto Torcuato Di Tella, Buenos Aires

David Lamelas, Office of Information about the Vietnam War at Three Levels: The Visual Image, Text, and Audio, 1968
Installation view at the LXXXIV Biennale di Venezia, Venice, 1968

David Lamelas, Situation of Time, 1967
Installation with 17 TV sets
Dimensions variable
Installation at Sprüth Magers Munich, 2007

David Lamelas, London Friends, 1974
Series of 11 black and white photographs
Silver gelatine print on barite paper, photographed from the original contact sheets
20 x 20 cm each
38,5 x 32,7 cm each (framed)
Edition 3 + 1 AP

David Lamelas, Film 18 Paris IV.70, 1970
Film Still

David Lamelas, Film Script (Manipulation of Meaning), 1972
Installation with 16mm film and 3 slide carrussels, 69 slides each
Dimensions variable
Edition 3 + 1 AP

David Lamelas, Limit of a projection I, 1967
Theatre spotlight in darkened room
Dimensions variable
Edition 1 + 1 AP Installation at Art Unlimited, Art Basel 2007

All works courtesy of the artist and Sprüth Magers, London-Berlin

Français

David Lamelas

Lexique

Coline Milliard

Né en Argentine, David Lamelas vit aujourd'hui aux États-Unis et incarne par excellence l'avant-garde conceptuelle des années 1960. Il développe depuis plus de quarante-cinq ans une œuvre singulière - films, installations et performances - qu'il revisite et retravaille depuis peu, dont l’installation Conexión de tres espacios (1966) bientôt exposée à Bloomberg SPACE à Londres. À l'occasion d'un entretien avec l'artiste, Coline Milliard a proposé six mots-clés, auxquels Lamelas a ajouté les siens dans une conversation au carrefour de Buenos Aires, Londres, Venise et Paris.

Coline Milliard: IMMATÉRIEL
David Lamelas: Vide, Aleph

Votre travail implique souvent une dématérialisation de l'œuvre d'art. Comment pensez-vous intégrer vos réflexions sur l'immatériel dans votre exposition à Bloomberg SPACE à Londres ?

Pour Bloomberg SPACE, je propose une nouvelle version de la pièce Connection of three spaces (Conexión de tres espacios) réalisée en 1966 à Buenos Aires au Di Tella Institute à l'occasion d'un prix national. Le rédacteur de la revue VH 101, Otto Hahn, était membre du jury cette année-là et avait adoré ma pièce. Mais pour les autres membres du jury, c'était un petit peu trop abstrait, du coup je n'ai pas eu le premier prix mais une mention spéciale.

À l'époque, je m'intéressais surtout à la perception instantanée de l'œuvre d'art. Le regard peut appréhender d'un seul coup d'œil une sculpture d'Henry Moore ou un tableau de Picasso, mais moi je voulais réaliser une œuvre qui nécessiterait un effort de construction mentale pour être comprise. J'ai donc installé mon œuvre dans trois pièces différentes, ce qui forçait le visiteur à se déplacer d'une pièce à l'autre pour accumuler les informations jusqu'à ce qu'il obtienne une image mentale de l'œuvre dans sa totalité. C'est comme dans un livre : la lecture se fait page après page sauf qu'à la fin, vous avez le livre entier dans la tête.

Dans la dernière pièce de Conexión de tres espacios, il n'y avait rien, l'œuvre avait complètement disparu. L'installation dépendait entièrement de l'espace d'exposition, le concept d'œuvre in-situ était encore assez nouveau à l'époque. Si vous prenez le minimalisme américain par exemple, les œuvres de ce mouvement sont encore dans la veine du travail d'Henry Moore, le résultat est visible en un coup d’oeil. Je voulais aller plus loin que cela. L'espace de Bloomberg SPACE ressemble un peu à l'espace de Di Tella, voilà pourquoi j'ai eu envie de repenser cette œuvre ici. L'espace est assez déconstruit, il n'y a pas d'espace d'exposition clairement défini, d'où l'idée d'avoir une seule œuvre qui réunisse ces différents espaces.

C.M: INFORMATION
D.L: J'essaie toujours de m'en libérer quand je fais une œuvre.

YVotre travail est une recherche constante sur le phénomène de l'information, je pense notamment à votre célèbre œuvre Office of information about the Vietnam War at Three Levels: The Visual Image, Text and Audio, exposée à la Biennale de Venise en 1968. Êtes-vous attentif aux moyens actuels de diffusion de l'information comme les nouveaux médias et l'Internet?

Le phénomène de l'information existe depuis que la race humaine a pris conscience de son existence. Il n'y a pas que l'Internet et les nouvelles technologies, il y a tant d'autres moyens de communication, la vue par exemple. Je ne m'intéresse pas seulement aux informations diffusées par les médias mais à l'information en général, l'information humaine.

Pourtant vous avez beaucoup travaillé sur l'actualité...

Oui, depuis toujours. Quand j'étais enfant, j'étais fasciné par mon père qui lisait le journal tous les jours à l'heure du déjeuner. Pour ma toute première exposition personnelle, j'ai montré des tableaux du chanteur de tango franco-argentin Carlos Gardel qui était une pop star à l'époque. J'avais pris un journal avec une image de lui et ça m'a donné l'idée d'une œuvre. J'ai toujours été inspiré par les médias, mais il m'a fallu des années avant d'en prendre intellectuellement conscience – c'est peut-être arrivé le jour où j'ai découvert le Structuralisme en France et des penseurs comme Roland Barthes. Et puis il y avait Marshall McLuhan qui était aussi une figure importante à l'époque. Tout cela m'a énormément influencé dans la façon d'utiliser les informations dans mon propre travail.

C.M: LONDRES
D.L: Mon coup de foudre.

En 1968, j'ai été invité à représenter l'Argentine à la Biennale de Venise. J'ai alors réalisé Office of information about the Vietnam War. J'avais choisi la guerre du Vietnam parce que c'était le sujet le plus important du moment, mais je m'intéressais surtout à la façon dont les actualités voyagent d'un endroit à l'autre. Je vivais en Argentine et pourtant je savais exactement ce qui se passait au Vietnam grâce aux actualités. Un journaliste au Vietnam écrivait un article sur ce qui se passait là-bas puis l'envoyait au journal qui à son tour me l'envoyait. Cette trajectoire me fascinait, je voulais comprendre comment l'information était parvenue jusqu'à moi.

Je me suis installé à Londres après un séjour en Italie et une halte à Paris. Il ne faut pas oublier que Mai 68 touchait à sa fin, c'était un moment très important. Lorsque je suis arrivé en Angleterre, j'avais accumulé un bagage de connaissances que les artistes anglais n'avaient pas encore reçu. Ils se sentaient encore héritiers de la sculpture anglaise des années 1960. L'art conceptuel anglais commençait à peine – Victor Burgin, Keth Arnatt, Gilbert & George, etc. Par pure coïncidence, on a tous fini par se rencontrer et nous voulions tous la même chose : se débarrasser de la matérialité de l'objet en art.

C.M: PARIS
D.L: Pensée structuraliste, Nouveau Roman

Quand je vivais en Angleterre, je me rendais à Paris au moins une fois par mois. J'avais beaucoup d'amis là-bas, beaucoup tournaient autour du mouvement structuraliste et de la revue Tel Quel. Dès que j'arrivais à Paris, j'allais tout de suite à La Hune, la librairie de Saint-Germain-des-Prés, pour regarder attentivement tout ce qui venait de sortir. J'avais l'impression d'aller à la fac. Je récoltais des tas d'informations que j'utilisais ensuite dans mes œuvres et je ramenais toutes ces connaissances en Angleterre. Je fonctionne toujours de la même manière : j'accumule des informations et puis je produis une œuvre. À l'époque, mes œuvres fonctionnaient selon des règles bien précises : j'avais écrit un dogme sur un morceau de papier et dès que j'avais un concept, je devais suivre mes propres règles.

C.M: ART CONCEPTUEL
D.L: Pensée en mouvement

L’art conceptuel est arrivé très tôt dans ma vie, j’étais encore étudiant aux Beaux Arts quand j’ai commencé à prêter attention au travail de Cézanne et Juan Gris, ainsi qu’à leur façon de "conceptualiser" la toile. J’ai fait ensuite un grand pas en avant quand j’ai découvert Marcel Duchamp et Alberto Greco, que j’ai rencontré à Buenos Aires. À partir du milieu des années 1960, le processus de dématérialisation et conceptualisation de l’œuvre d’art est devenu ma préoccupation première. Quand je me suis installé en Angleterre à la fin des années 1960 et que j'ai découvert la Belgique (où j’ai rencontré Marcel Broodthaers et Daniel Buren), je me suis rendu compte que le travail de certains artistes européens était très proche de la façon dont moi et d'autres Argentins pensaient l'art. L’IDÉE primait sur l’objet. Peu après, j’ai rencontré Lawrence Weiner et John Baldessari… Et on connaît la suite.

C.M: FICTION
D.L: Une partie de vérité

La fiction est intrinsèquement liée à la réalité et à notre activité quotidienne quelle qu'elle soit. C'est un outil de survie. Quand vous vous levez le matin, vous vous regardez dans le miroir et vous voyez une personne qui n'est que la fiction de vous-même. C'est un phénomène de fiction. De même, celui qui sort dans la rue n'est pas le même homme que celui qui a quitté son lit le matin même. Ce phénomène de construction de soi est lié à la fiction – mais cette fiction représente aussi une part de vérité. Fiction et réalité se mélangent sans cesse.

Cela me fait penser à votre série de photographies Antwerp (1969) qui documente de façon clinique la vie urbaine d'Anvers, ou encore à votre série London Friends (1973) dans laquelle vous avez fait photographier vos amis par un photographe de mode professionnel. Est-ce une façon pour vous de transformer en fiction la réalité qui vous entoure ?

Il s'agit plutôt d'un déni de fiction. Dans 18 Paris (1970) et mes autres films, je voulais représenter le monde tel quel. Mais quand j'ai vu les œuvres que vous citez pour la première fois, j'ai réalisé qu'elles portaient en elles certains éléments de fiction. C'était inévitable. Lorsque je suis arrivé aux États-Unis en 1978, j'ai tout de suite remarqué à quel point la fiction était présente dans la politique américaine : l'information en tant que telle était transformée, voire manipulée par le contexte politique et par conséquent devenait pure fiction. Je vous parle des États-Unis mais on retrouve aujourd’hui le même phénomène dans le monde entier. Les actualités politiques changent complètement en fonction du pays dans lequel vous vous trouvez. J'ai toujours été un étranger, dans tous les pays où je suis allé, j'ai eu la chance de pouvoir accumuler des informations venant de pays très différents. Par exemple, lorsque j'ai quitté l'Argentine, Che Guevara était un héros. En France, c'était un héros. Quand je suis arrivé aux États-Unis, c'était un criminel. C'est là que j'ai vraiment compris que tout dépend du point de vue que vous adoptez pour regarder les choses.

IMAGE CREDITS

David Lamelas, Conexión de tres espacios, 1966
Installation view in Premio Nacional
Instituto Torcuato Di Tella, Buenos Aires

David Lamelas, Office of Information about the Vietnam War at Three Levels: The Visual Image, Text, and Audio, 1968
Installation view at the LXXXIV Biennale di Venezia, Venice, 1968

David Lamelas, Situation of Time, 1967
Installation with 17 TV sets
Dimensions variable
Installation at Sprüth Magers Munich, 2007

David Lamelas, London Friends, 1974
Series of 11 black and white photographs
Silver gelatine print on barite paper, photographed from the original contact sheets
20 x 20 cm each
38,5 x 32,7 cm each (framed)
Edition 3 + 1 AP

David Lamelas, Film 18 Paris IV.70, 1970
Film Still

David Lamelas, Film Script (Manipulation of Meaning), 1972
Installation with 16mm film and 3 slide carrussels, 69 slides each
Dimensions variable
Edition 3 + 1 AP

David Lamelas, Limit of a projection I, 1967
Theatre spotlight in darkened room
Dimensions variable
Edition 1 + 1 AP Installation at Art Unlimited, Art Basel 2007

All works courtesy of the artist and Sprüth Magers, London-Berlin

 
advertisement advertisement advertisement