artwork image
artwork image
artwork image
artwork image
artwork image
artwork image
artwork image

English

A Cross-Channel Conversation

Caterina Riva and Caroline Soyez-Petithomme

Where does the dematerialisation of the art object leave the exhibition curator? How can open-ended creation processes be exhibited? Focusing on post-conceptual strategies, FormContent’s Caterina Riva and La Salle de Bains’ Caroline Soyez-Petithomme discuss the aims and challenges of FormContent’s recent exhibitions.

Caroline Soyez-Petithomme: The Plurality of One (2010) at Monitor, Rome, is one of the latest exhibitions curated by FormContent, a curatorial project you started in 2007 with Francesco Pedraglio and Pieternel Vermoortel. I didn’t have the chance to see it but you gave me a virtual guided tour. And as the show is all about transmissions and variations, that seemed entirely congruent with the exhibition premise itself.

Caterina Riva: It is definitely very relevant. Re-telling the exhibition is one of the possible ways to highlight its stratification and the links existing between the works. The exhibition in Rome was the result of a week spent in the gallery with the artists, discussing and fine-tuning the exhibition. Visitors were invited to come in and see the show as it was coming together. At our space in Dalston, East London, we spend time talking directly to our visitors. We try to help them unveil some of the pieces’ complexity. This does not mean that we suggest one dominant narrative, quite the opposite: we try to free a plurality of interpretations through discussion with the audience.

CSP: Considering your focus on creation and processes, mediation is a big deal, and one that can be controversial if perceived as an intrusion into the work’s space. Yet the types of pieces gathered in The Plurality of One seem to ask for it; it’s as if they needed to be ‘told’ to fully exist. I wonder what the artists make of oral explanations – it can be very direct, too direct perhaps, but it can also become an extension of the work. Did you talk with the artists about this?

CR: Yes we did, and this whole discussion was part of the exhibition itself. What is hidden? What is revealed? Mediation is both the conversation between curators and audience and the discussion between curators and artists. As curators, we are not simply working with images, there is a narrative at hand; more or less visible, but always present.

CSP: As a curatorial collective, you seem very interested in testing the limitations of the exhibition format as well as the physical boundaries of the space. This is particularly striking in your publication Rehearsing Realities (2008) as well as in the show Have a Look! Have a Look! (2010) which focused on audio material and turned the space into a recording studio and a venue for performances. Some of the works were sent to you digitally and most of the show existed only online. Could you tell me more about this project?

CR: Have a Look! Have a Look! has allowed us to break free from geographical and financial boundaries. The move beyond the physicality of the space, more than defying any architectural constraint, had to do with an attempt to reach a larger group of people while opening up a different space for artistic creation. The artists’ contributions were very different from what we expected to get, and Have a Look! Have a Look! offered a really broad range of exciting interventions: narratives, documentations, fictions, sound recordings, archives, theatre pieces, among many other things.

CSP: What interests you in artworks so reduced in content and form that they can sometimes become abstruse to the viewer? It seems to me that today this artistic strategy is no longer a way to resist to the traditional system of art distribution. What do those dematerialised artworks mean to you and express in the current context?

CR: For the first generation of Conceptualists, dematerialisation was an attempt to find an alternative model for art distribution. Today it seems messier, the definitions are less clear and I am not sure I have a definite answer. Perhaps the question should be about what constitutes fruitful post-conceptual strategies: is there a gap between ideas and objects? What is implied by the absence or the withdrawal of the finished object? What are the financial implications of these choices? A recurring characteristic of FormContent’s programme is the visibility of the exhibition-making process. This is achieved mainly through talks, performances and screenings. The exhibitions are not a goal in themselves but an exercise both for the artists and the curators. Our strategy is often to select a medium or interest and invite participants to suggest content. It can be books, as in the exhibition It's not for reading. It's for making (2009) or, for example, films, like in The Filmic Conventions (2009). It’s like proceeding in reverse, starting from an established definition to prove its fallacy. We try to invent new categories that are operational and practice-driven instead of theory-driven, and where the curator is not hidden but creates the operational context.

CSP: The exhibition can become a live performance, a spectacle animated by the production of works, and some of your shows make the creation process very tangible.

CR: We work mainly with emerging artists and are not so interested in simply showing existing works. We offer artists a place where they can pursue ideas and/or give temporary shape to them, in a process that doesn’t stop with the FormContent show but hopefully continues later. It’s about questioning the idea of a finished and resolved object in space and time. What differentiates us from a commercial gallery or an institution is that we are free to experiment and to make mistakes. The very name of our space, FormContent, reflects on what’s at stake behind ‘Form’ and ‘Content’. They are not balanced parts of an equation; they need to be constantly redefined.

IMAGE CREDITS

All Photos:
The plurality of One, Curated by FormContent
Monitor, Rome, 2010
Photo Credit: Massimo Valicchia

Jesse Ash, When words fold out to make screens, 2009

Jesse Ash, When words fold out to make screens, 2009 (detail)

Ed Atkins, Death Mask II: scene I, dream sequence, 2010

Ed Atkins, Death Mask II: scene I, dream sequence, 2010 (detail)

Installation view

Adam Avikainen, Janitrix and Mycological Theater, 2006

Adam Avikainen, Janitrix and Mycological Theater, 2006 (detail)

Français

Conversation

Caterina Riva et Caroline Soyez-Petithomme

Comment exposer le processus de création? L'œuvre dématérialisée ? Cette conversation entre Caterina Riva, co-directrice du collectif de commissaires londoniens FormContent et Caroline Soyez-Petithomme, co-directrice de La Salle de Bains à Lyon, revient sur les dernières expositions organisées par FormContent et sur les réussites et échecs des stratégies post-conceptuelles.

Caroline Soyez-Petithomme : FormContent est un collectif de commissaires que tu as créé en 2007 avec Francesco Pedraglio et Pieternel Vermoortel. Parmi vos expositions les plus récentes, The Plurality of One (2010) organisée à la galerie Monitor (Rome) interroge l'idée de transmission et de variation. Je n’ai malheureusement pas pu m'y rendre mais la visite virtuelle que tu as pu m'en faire reste finalement très cohérente avec le concept de l’exposition.

Caterina Riva : Tout à fait. Raconter l’exposition est une manière de réactualiser ses différents niveaux de lecture ainsi que les liens qui existent entre les œuvres. The Plurality of One s'intéresse au processus de conversation avec le public. Quand on discute avec nos visiteurs, ce n’est évidemment pas pour les forcer à accepter une seule et unique interprétation mais plutôt pour les inviter à comprendre la manière dont l’exposition a été abordée pendant sa préparation. Pour The Plurality of One, nous avons passé une semaine à discuter avec les artistes dans la galerie. Le public était invité à venir faire l’expérience de l’exposition avant même qu’elle n'existe. Dans l'espace que nous avons à Dalston, à l’est de Londres, nous parlons beaucoup avec nos visiteurs, nous essayons de décrypter certaines œuvres qu'ils trouvent parfois difficiles à comprendre. Cela ne veut pas dire que nous imposons une seule lecture de l'œuvre, bien au contraire, c'est par ces discussions que nous essayons de libérer une pluralité d’interprétations.

CSP : Vu l’importance que vous donnez au processus de création, la médiation semble être une part cruciale de votre travail de commissaire. On pourrait la considérer comme problématique, notamment lorsqu'elle fait intrusion dans l’espace de l’œuvre. Et pourtant, les pièces que vous montrez dans The Plurality of One semblent exiger une forme de médiation, comme si elles avaient besoin de se raconter pour exister pleinement. Je me demande ce que les artistes pensent des explications que vous donnez à l'oral. Elles prennent le risque d’être trop directes, mais peuvent aussi devenir une prolongation de l’œuvre. En avez-vous parlé avec les artistes?

CR : Bien sûr, cette discussion était au cœur même de l’exposition. Que choisit-on de cacher ou de révéler ? La médiation ne concerne pas seulement les conversations entre le public et les commissaires, mais aussi celles qui existent entre ces derniers et les artistes. En tant que commissaires, nous ne travaillons pas simplement avec des images. Il y a toujours un récit sous-jacent, parfois très discret, mais bien présent.

CSP : D'une certaine manière, vous tentez de repousser les limites du format de l’exposition ainsi que son espace physique. On retrouve clairement cette tentative dans votre publication Rehearsing Realities (2008) ou dans l’exposition Have a Look! Have a Look! (2010), qui regroupait un ensemble de matériaux sonores. Vous aviez même transformé votre lieu en studio d’enregistrement et en espace de performances. De nombreuses pièces présentées avaient été envoyées par email et l’exposition existait principalement sur l’Internet.

CR : Have a Look! Have a Look! nous a permis de nous libérer de contraintes à la fois financières et géographiques. Nous ne cherchions pas vraiment à défier les limites architecturales de l’espace d’exposition mais plutôt à toucher un grand nombre de gens. Le projet nous a aussi permis d’ouvrir un nouvel espace pour la création artistique. Les contributions des artistes étaient très différentes, nous avons reçu des histoires, des documents, des fictions, des enregistrements sonores, des archives, des pièces de théâtre, pour ne citer que quelques exemples. Leurs interventions étaient très dynamiques.

CSP : Le lien entre la forme et le contenu de ces œuvres est parfois si ténu que leur intention devient difficile à cerner. Quelle est ta position vis-à-vis de ce décalage ? Aujourd'hui, ces stratégies n'ont plus grand chose à voir avec les anciennes formes de résistance aux systèmes traditionnels de distribution de l’art. Comment envisager la dématérialisation de l’œuvre d’art dans le contexte contemporain ?

CR : Pour la première génération d'artistes conceptuels, la dématérialisation de l’œuvre d’art était une tentative d’échapper au marché et de mettre en place un autre modèle de distribution. Aujourd’hui, c'est plus compliqué, à vrai dire, je ne suis pas sûre d’avoir la réponse. Qu’est-ce qu’une stratégie post-conceptuelle qui fonctionne ? Quelle différence y a-t-il entre les idées et les objets? Que signifie l’absence, voire le retrait de l’objet achevé ? Quelles sont les conséquences financières de ces choix ? Une des caractéristiques de la programmation mise en place par FormContent tient à la visibilité du processus de l’exposition, une visibilité que l’on obtient surtout grâce aux conférences, performances et projections. Pour nous, l’exposition n’est pas un but en soi, mais plutôt un exercice, pour les artistes et les commissaires. En général, on choisit un médium ou un thème et on invite des participants à nous proposer le contenu, par exemple le livre pour l’exposition It's not for reading. It's for making (2009), ou le film pour The Filmic Conventions (2009). Nous partons d’une idée simple et essayons d’en élargir le concept. Le but est d’inventer de nouvelles catégories qui reposent sur la pratique plutôt que la théorie, et où le commissaire a toute sa place.

CSP : Même lorsque vos expositions prennent la forme de performances et de spectacles, la question de la production des œuvres reste centrale dans votre travail. Le processus de création est omniprésent.

CR : Nous travaillons surtout avec de jeunes artistes. Faire des expositions à partir d’œuvres existantes ne nous intéresse pas vraiment. FormContent propose aux artistes un espace dans lequel ils peuvent développer leurs idées ou leur donner une forme temporaire s’ils le souhaitent. Nous essayons de remettre en question l’idée d’œuvre en tant qu’objet achevé. À la différence d’une galerie ou d’une institution, nous pouvons nous permettre d'expérimenter et de faire des erreurs. Le nom de FormContent résume assez bien cette réflexion sur les concepts de ‘forme’ et de ‘contenu’. Ces deux concepts ne sont pas équivalents : l'équation entre la ‘forme’ et le ‘contenu’ doit sans cesse être réinventée.

IMAGE CREDITS

All Photos:
The plurality of One, Curated by FormContent
Monitor, Rome, 2010
Photo Credit: Massimo Valicchia

Jesse Ash, When words fold out to make screens, 2009

Jesse Ash, When words fold out to make screens, 2009 (detail)

Ed Atkins, Death Mask II: scene I, dream sequence, 2010

Ed Atkins, Death Mask II: scene I, dream sequence, 2010 (detail)

Installation view

Adam Avikainen, Janitrix and Mycological Theater, 2006

Adam Avikainen, Janitrix and Mycological Theater, 2006 (detail)

 
advertisement advertisement advertisement