artwork image
artwork image
artwork image
artwork image
artwork image
artwork image
artwork image

English

Martin Creed

Feel Better

David Barrett

Can conceptual art be jubilant? David Barrett is perked up by Bernard Frize and Martin Creed.

Back in 1996 I reviewed a show of paintings by Bernard Frize. I was struck by the artist’s ability to make process-based paintings that hinted at the pared-down mechanics of classic conceptual art, but which delighted in flamboyant painterly aesthetics and the physicality of paint. While Frize reduced variables and had a strict production process for his work, he allowed other aspects – notably colour – to run wild, preventing the painting from achieving (or being reduced to) the status of text. For all the conceptual rigour in his work, he added a little something extra, something that we in the UK have to use a French term for: joie de vivre. This was a difference, I thought, between British and French approaches to conceptual art.

Beauty terrorist

In ‘The Lost Conceptualism’, his feature for November 2009 Art Monthly, Mark Prince outlined a difference between UK and US conceptual art. For Prince, UK artists turned their attention inwards through a self-reflexive investigation of the materials and conditions of the work itself, resulting in closed feedback loops of meaning which often resulted in a very dry aesthetic – although not without a wry humour. In the US, however, artists were turning their attention outwards, towards their social environments and even the landscape itself, resulting in Vito Acconci’s examination of the social self and Robert Smithson’s Land Art, to give two examples.

The rigorously self-reflexive approach of British artists that Prince identified is exactly what I had in mind while looking at the Frize paintings. This was in the UK in 1996, when the idea of frivolity in painting was simply not acceptable; Gary Hume described himself as a ‘beauty terrorist’ when his paintings at the time took on a now-familiar decorative slant.

Straight face

Times have certainly changed, but although we have been swamped with whimsical and frivolous paintings in recent years, there are some British artists who have self-consciously adopted the techniques and aesthetics of the 1970s. In his article, Prince identifies Martin Creed as the artist epitomising this tactic, and concludes that: ‘His work might be an elaborately constructed conceit to stave off irony, and thereby restore the pioneering spirit of experimental enquiry which seems to have come naturally to the artists of the late 1960s and early 70s, but now requires continuous effort, like someone desperately trying to keep a straight face.’

This effort, this suppressed laughter, is a crucial aspect of Creed’s production, and it brings something of Frize’s playfulness to work that might initially appear po-faced in the extreme. Although Creed presents his work as the result of a ceaseless reductionism, he loves to include wild cards, or use materials and genres that resist reduction. This is the same principle so beloved of Frize: introducing a wild variable into a controlled process to produce a self-defeating reductionism.

Emotional spike

While the idea of visualising half the air in a given space may seem like a classic conceptual art strategy, Creed’s initial decision to use coloured balloons to carry out his project was a tactic that would have been anathema to John Hilliard in 1970, for example. Work No. 670 (Orson & Sparky), 2007, may initially appear to be a simple video study in gait as young men walk purposefully across the studio before the camera, but having them alternate with a lurching wolf hound and a nervous chihuahua introduces an element of absurdity that is hilarious in the context of the formal set-up of the work. Creed may have internalised the questioning attitude of conceptual art, but he craves an emotional spike to go with the intellectual investigations.

Creed’s performances highlight this most clearly. His rock band, Owada, capture the spirit of Creed’s reductive intentions and flamboyant tendencies. He can take the clichéd emotions of rock lyrics that speak of ‘feeling blue’ and skewer them with the deadpan rejoinder ‘I’m feeling brown’, or take the bland ‘one, two, three, four’ count-in and imbue it with rock ’n’ roll vibrancy, turning it into the sole lyric for a crashalong song that nevertheless relies on conceptual art’s fascination with abstracted systems.

Minimal/Maximal

One of Creed’s most ambitious live works was his collaboration with a classical ballet troupe at Sadler’s Wells in October 2009. Simultaneously performing with Owada and showing videos projected onto the backdrop while dancers performed Creed-choreographed movements, this was a lesson in how minimal gestures can be made maximal, and tight processes can combine to near chaotic effect. The project married the rigorous, almost-paranoiac curiosity of British conceptual art with a continental joie de vivre, producing art that was both convivial and generous without feeling the need to drag the reluctant viewer up onto the stage.

Creed concluded his Sadler’s Wells gigs with one of his deliberately hesitant monologues, finally stating that his only intention with the work is to help the audience ‘feel better’. It was clear that he meant this as much in the traditional emotive sense – cheeriness – as in the phenomenological, haptic and inquisitive senses.

Martin Creed
20/02/2010 - 3/04/2010
The Common Guild
Glasgow, Scotland
www.thecommonguild.org.uk

Bernard Frize
10/02/2010 - 24/03/2010
Simon Lee Gallery
London, UK
www.simonleegallery.com

IMAGE CREDITS

Martin Creed, Work No. 551, Half the air in a given space, 2006
16'' brown balloons
Dimensions variable
Courtesy the artist and Hauser & Wirth
Photo: Hugo Glendinning

Bernard Frize, Suite Automatique N 5, 1996
Acrylic, charcoal and pastel on paper
80 x 80 cm
© Andre Morin
Courtesy Simon Lee Gallery, London

Bernard Frize, eem>Wand, 1996
Acrylic and resin on canvas
200 x 200 cm
© Andre Morin
Courtesy Simon Lee Gallery, London

Martin Creed, Work No. 748, 2007
Photographic print
14 x 15 in / 35.5 cm x 38 cm
Courtesy the artist and Hauser & Wirth

Martin Creed, Work No. 790, EVERYTHING IS GOING TO BE ALRIGHT, 2007
Neon
32 x 98.8 x 6 inches
Installation view at the Museum for Contemporary Art Detroit
Courtesy the artist
Photo: Ellen Page Wilson

Martin Creed, Work No. 850, 2008
Installation view at TATE Britain, London/UK
Courtesy Rennie Collection, Vancouver
Photo: Hugo Glendinning
© Martin Creed

Martin Creed, Work No. 1020, 2009
Dance piece for 5 classical dancers
Performed at Sadler’s Wells
Courtesy the artist and Sadler’s Wells
© Martin Creed

(COVER issue 3 - Catalogue Archive section)
Martin Creed, Work No. 701, 2007
Nails
Edition of 3 + 1 AP
0.5 x 30 x 13.5 cm
Courtesy the artist and Hauser & Wirth
Photo: Hugo Glendinning

Français

Martin Creed

Feel Better

David Barrett

Joie de vivre et art conceptuel sont-ils compatibles ? Réponse des deux côtés de la Manche avec une étude en miroir de Martin Creed et Bernard Frize.

En 1996, j'avais été frappé par une exposition de Bernard Frize sur laquelle j'avais écris un compte-rendu. La conception de ses tableaux reflétait l'association inattendue d'un style épuré typique de l'art conceptuel et d'une peinture flamboyante par sa matérialité. Frize laisse peu de chance au hasard. Il travaille de façon très rigoureuse tout en laissant d'autres éléments, comme la couleur, se développer librement. L'œuvre échappe alors à la lecture réductrice d'un texte écrit. Frize n'est pas un conceptuel rigide, il ajoute toujours quelque chose en plus, un petit quelque chose qu'on appelle ici au Royaume-Uni, la ''joie de vivre'', pour reprendre l'expression française. J'ai tout de suite pensé que la différence majeure entre art conceptuel français et anglais se situait exactement là, dans la joie de vivre.

Terroriste de la beauté

Dans un article intitulé ''The Lost Conceptualism'' (''Le conceptualisme perdu''), paru dans la revue Art Monthly en novembre 2009, Mark Prince souligne la différence entre art conceptuel anglais et américain. Selon lui, les artistes anglais ont tendance à privilégier l'introspection : les œuvres reflètent leurs propres conditions de production, matérielles ou non, et fonctionnent en circuit fermé. Cette méthode réflexive aboutit à une esthétique raide teintée parfois d'un peu d'ironie. Aux États-Unis, en revanche, les artistes sont beaucoup plus tournés vers le monde extérieur, leur environnement social, le paysage. On citera notamment les recherches sur le moi social de Vito Acconci ou les œuvres de Land Art de Robert Smithson.

L’approche autoréflexive des conceptuels anglais telle que Prince la décrit résume tout à fait ce que j’avais ressenti devant les tableaux de Frize. En 1996, l'Angleterre n'était visiblement pas encore prête à assumer la fantaisie en peinture ; à l'époque, Gary Hume s'était même surnommé ''terroriste de la beauté'' pour affirmer le style décoratif de ses tableaux aujourd'hui célèbres.

Restons sérieux

Face à la récente vague déferlante de peintures au style excentrique, je me dis que les temps ont bien changé. Il reste toutefois quelques artistes anglais qui continuent délibérément à emprunter les codes esthétiques des années 1970. Pour Prince, Martin Creed est l'incarnation par excellence de ce retour, il conclut en disant : ''Le travail de Creed est un leurre, une tentative désespérée de combattre toute ironie qui viendrait froisser l'esprit pionnier des artistes d'avant-garde de la fin des années 1960 et du début des années 1970. Son œuvre ressemble à quelqu'un qui se force à rester sérieux, qui s'acharne sans cesse à ne pas éclater de rire.''

Ce geste forcé, ce rire au coin des lèvres, symbolise l'essentiel de la pratique de Creed. Son esthétique abrupte infestée de fantaisie et d'humour est très proche de celle des œuvres de Frize. Creed revendique l'épurement constant des formes sans pour autant se priver d’une part de hasard. Les genres auxquels il se réfère, les matériaux qu'il utilise, résistent aux tendances minimales de son travail. Frize subit le même tiraillement lorsqu’il introduit des procédés aléatoires dans un cadre contrôlé par des règles qu’il sabote lui-même.

Une pointe d’émotion

On a souvent l’impression que les œuvres de Creed rendent hommage aux postulats de l’art conceptuel, par exemple sa tentative de visualiser la moitié de l'air contenu dans un espace. Et pourtant, aucun artiste conceptuel des années 1970 dans la lignée de John Hilliard n’aurait osé s’y prendre en remplissant l'espace de ballons de couleur. Work No. 670 (Orson & Sparky) (2007) aurait pu être une étude sur le comportement et la démarche des gens si Creed n'avait pas mis en parallèle un plan de jeunes qui marchent d'un pas décidé dans l'atelier avec un chien qui titube et un Chihuahua craintif. Cette relation absurde mélangée à l'aspect formel de l'œuvre rend la scène hilarante. Bien que Creed semble avoir intériorisé les préceptes de l'art conceptuel, il ne peut s’empêcher de rajouter une pointe d’émotion.

Les performances de Creed illustrent parfaitement cette posture. Son groupe de rock Owada s'est approprié cette tendance à mi-chemin entre minimalisme et exubérance. Creed reprend notamment les émotions clichés de paroles de chanson rock pour transformer par exemple, ''feeling blue'' en répliques sarcastiques du genre ''I'm feeling brown''. Il reprend aussi le classique compte à rebours ''et un, deux, trois, quatre'' comme unique parole de chanson pour en faire un morceau rock’n’roll percutant qui repose néanmoins sur la fascination de l’art conceptuel pour les systèmes abstraits.

Joie de vivre

Sa collaboration avec la troupe du ballet classique au théâtre Sadler’s Wells en octobre 2009 est sans doute l'une des performances les plus ambitieuses de Creed. L'artiste et son groupe accompagnaient la chorégraphie des danseurs écrite par Creed avec en toile de fond ses vidéos projetées. Le geste le plus minimal prenait des allures grandioses, on avait l'impression que leur technique infaillible pouvait basculer à tout moment dans le chaos total. La performance célébrait le mariage de la rigueur quasi paranoïaque de l'art conceptuel anglais avec une joie de vivre typiquement européenne, un art à la fois convivial et généreux sans qu’il y ait besoin de traîner sur scène le spectateur réticent.

Creed a terminé son concert au Sadler’s Wells avec un de ses monologues volontairement vagues et hésitants pour dire que la seule intention de son œuvre était d’aider le public à ''se sentir mieux''. Il se réferait sans aucun doute au double sens de sentir, au sens traditionnel d'une sensation qui vient vous toucher (l'émotion) et au sens plus phénoménologique d'une sensation que vous cherchez vous-même à toucher (l'expérience).

Martin Creed
20/02/2010 - 3/04/2010
The Common Guild
Glasgow, Scotland
www.thecommonguild.org.uk

Bernard Frize
10/02/2010 - 24/03/2010
Simon Lee Gallery
London, UK
www.simonleegallery.com

IMAGE CREDITS

Martin Creed, Work No. 551, Half the air in a given space, 2006
16'' brown balloons
Dimensions variable
Courtesy the artist and Hauser & Wirth
Photo: Hugo Glendinning

Bernard Frize, Suite Automatique N 5, 1996
Acrylic, charcoal and pastel on paper
80 x 80 cm
© Andre Morin
Courtesy Simon Lee Gallery, London

Bernard Frize, eem>Wand, 1996
Acrylic and resin on canvas
200 x 200 cm
© Andre Morin
Courtesy Simon Lee Gallery, London

Martin Creed, Work No. 748, 2007
Photographic print
14 x 15 in / 35.5 cm x 38 cm
Courtesy the artist and Hauser & Wirth

Martin Creed, Work No. 790, EVERYTHING IS GOING TO BE ALRIGHT, 2007
Neon
32 x 98.8 x 6 inches
Installation view at the Museum for Contemporary Art Detroit
Courtesy the artist
Photo: Ellen Page Wilson

Martin Creed, Work No. 850, 2008
Installation view at TATE Britain, London/UK
Courtesy Rennie Collection, Vancouver
Photo: Hugo Glendinning
© Martin Creed

Martin Creed, Work No. 1020, 2009
Dance piece for 5 classical dancers
Performed at Sadler’s Wells
Courtesy the artist and Sadler’s Wells
© Martin Creed

(COVER issue 3 - Catalogue Archive section)
Martin Creed, Work No. 701, 2007
Nails
Edition of 3 + 1 AP
0.5 x 30 x 13.5 cm
Courtesy the artist and Hauser & Wirth
Photo: Hugo Glendinning

 
advertisement advertisement advertisement