artwork image
artwork image
artwork image
artwork image
artwork image
artwork image
artwork image
artwork image
artwork image

English

Colin Guillemet

A Better World

Coline Milliard

Birds, flags, electric globes and cartoonish chairs; visual culture and 20th century utopias. Colin Guillemet pulls it all out of his hat.

In Colin Guillemet’s Around the world (2009), a globe is plugged into the wall. There’s nothing unusual, really, except that between this mini earth and the socket, various plug adapters are stuck together in an ungainly tube of electrical complexity. The planet is desperately reliant on these little prostheses to function; they are the only remedy for our inability – and probably unwillingness – to standardise something as crucial as power supply. For the Paris-born, Zurich-based artist, Around the world is ‘a statement piece’, a visual one-liner poking fun at international technologies’ shortcomings, or, if you are versed in 19th century fiction, the hassle awaiting a modern-day Phileas Fogg. ‘I’m interested in the fact that everything is referential’, says Guillemet. ‘The way one looks at art always depends on one’s reference.’ And it is these references that he sets out to undermine: those shared by millions, and those shared only by a few (usually in the art world).

In the Dos and Don’ts series (2003-ongoing), Guillemet juxtaposes pairs of images vaguely linked by formal affinities, and displays them as ‘safety’ cards throughout the gallery space. Each picture is associated with a sign; one bears a green tick, the other, a red cross. Do: the fingers of God and Adam in Michelangelo’s Sistine Chapel; Don’t: the hard-clasped hands of performing professional ice-skaters. Do: a concentrating Jackson Pollock pouring paint on a canvas; Don’t: a calligrapher painting with three brushes in each hand and two in his mouth. Looking at these is always a bit uneasy. While you confusedly understand why such-and-such an image was ‘approved’ or ‘rejected’, you also uncover your own deeply engrained preconceptions: the genius male artist, the kitsch of certain practices, etc. Guillemet asks you to empathise with his thinking process and then leaves you enmeshed in your own prejudices.

Well, your coat, sir, is a brave one!

If the Dos and Don’ts series has something of the inside joke, Canary Shift (2005) tackles a much more widely shared reference: colour. A live canary is displayed for the duration of the exhibition and fed with canthaxanthin (a natural pigment available in pet shops and used, Guillemet explains, by ‘people tuning their canaries for beauty contests’). As weeks pass, the bird – which was a solid yellow to start with – turns bright orange. It is hence dispossessed of its main attribute. What is more yellow than a canary? You can buy canary yellow paint. You can talk about ‘a canary dress’. The bird has come to define the very essence of yellowness. Is an orange canary still a canary? What sort of a place would earth be if canaries were not yellow but orange? Has the fact that this very canary has changed its plumage provoked any broader consequences? ‘Maybe it’s not just the canary’, ventures Guillemet. ‘Maybe it’s the whole world that has shifted a notch.’

In the watercolour series Marines/Self-spoken studies (2009), the artist has selected and painted simple geometrical shapes: crosses, stripes and the like. Their frames, as well as their display on a wall, clearly inscribe them within an art historical tradition from Alexander Rodchenko to Sol LeWitt. But these graphics are in fact drawn from the well-established code of international maritime signal flags. The white cross on blue signifies ‘my vessel is stopped’, the two navy stripes stand for ‘I am on fire and leaking dangerous cargo, stay well clear of me’. Bypassing the aesthetic debates on whether or not art can, or should, be interpreted, Guillemet presents us with paintings that can genuinely be read.

Modernism

The Marines/Self-spoken studies series is also a dig at the art world’s craze for Modernism. ‘Ninety per cent of art production at the moment is about Modernism’, says Guillemet. ‘Eighty years later, the best thing we can come up with is a comment on it.’ In his own take on the great ‘ism’, this inherited visual lexicon is offset by a large dose of tongue-in-cheek humour. The Monochromes for a better world (2009-2010) is a series of life-size flags hanging from very official-looking poles screwed to the wall. All were tinted with medical products. For example, the red banner – the utopian flag par excellence – was given its bright shade with eosin, a common antiseptic applied to dry wounds and used to treat chicken pox sores and babies’ diaper rash. ‘It’s about being cheeky with the great ideas of Modernism’, says the artist. Eosin does make the world a better place – and Guillemet’s red flag defeats the associations it immediately provokes.

This tension between appearance and reality, what an object looks like and what it is, is fundamental to Guillemet’s practice. In the series of photographs Diseased Chairs (2008-2009), a chair is many times transformed: round white stickers turn it into a cartoonish gruyere; drawings of drops stuck to the seat make it dribble. The chair is one of the most basic pieces of furniture, the one that allows you to rest, to eat or to work. For Arthur Rimbaud in his poem Les Assis (1871), the chair characterises the bourgeois, the sitting position being in itself a resignation. Here, Guillemet attacks his own studio chair; he’s sawing off the very branch on which he’s sitting, as if forcing himself to abandon any comfort – an apt metaphor for artistic investigation. The visual tricks – papers, stickers – are obvious, and it’s this very obviousness that allows the piece to function. Guillemet doesn’t pretend to truly change the chair, he just invites us to momentarily shift our perception of it. ‘It’s like with the phrase: if it looks like a duck, swims like a duck, and quacks like a duck, then it probably is a duck’, he says. ‘Your job as an artist is to say, it’s not just a fucking duck!’

IMAGE CREDITS

Colin Guillemet, Around the world, 2009 Globe and various international mains adaptors Dimensions variable

Colin Guillemet, Do/Don’t (ongoing series) Michelangelo, 2003 Dimensions variable

Colin Guillemet, Do/Don’t (ongoing series) Pollock, 2008 Dimensions variable

Colin Guillemet, Canari Shift, 2005 Canary bird, cage, laced bird seeds Installation view Wäinö Aaltonen Museum, Turku, Finland

Colin Guillemet, Marines (ongoing series) I am dragging my anchor (yellow/red), 2009 Watercolour on paper and text 50 x 40 cm

Colin Guillemet, Marines (ongoing series) Watercolour on paper and text

Colin Guillemet, Monochromes for a better world (ongoing series) Eosine Flag, 2009 Mixed media 220 x 160 cm

Colin Guillemet, Diseased Chairs, 2008-10 Bump Chair, 2008 7 ink-jet prints, framed 127 x 85 cm

Colin Guillemet, Diseased Chairs, 2008-10 7 ink-jet prints, framed 127 x 85 cm

Français

Colin Guillemet

Un monde meilleur

Coline Milliard

Oiseaux, drapeaux, globes et chaises de dessins animés, Colin Guillemet a plus d’un tour dans son sac.

Around the world (2009) de Colin Guillemet est une petite mappemonde reliée à une prise murale. Rien d'inhabituel à première vue, sauf qu'entre le globe et la prise, l'artiste a branché des tas d'adaptateurs, grossièrement accumulés les uns derrière les autres. Notre planète dépend entièrement de ces petites prothèses en plastique, seuls remèdes à notre incapacité (ou à notre refus) de standardiser quelque chose d’aussi important que l’énergie électrique. Guillemet, qui est né à Paris et vit aujourd'hui à Zurich, considère Around the world comme une œuvre clé de son travail. C’est un pied de nez aux absurdités de notre soi-disant progrès technologique, ou alors, si vous êtes féru de littérature du XIXe siècle, une allusion aux futurs tourments du Phileas Fogg contemporain. “Je m'intéresse au fait que tout ce qui nous entoure fait référence à quelque chose, explique l’artiste. Notre rapport à l’art dépend toujours de nos références.” Et ce sont ces références-là qu'il sape, celles que nous sommes des millions à partager comme celles connues par un tout petit milieu (en particulier le monde de l'art).

Dans la série Dos and Don’ts (2003-en cours) que l'on pourrait traduire par "à faire et à ne pas faire", Guillemet juxtapose deux images aux affinités formelles plus ou moins directes, avec en guise d'avertissement sur chacune, une case cochée en vert ou barrée d'une croix rouge qui approuve ou interdit son contenu. À faire : les doigts d'Adam et de Dieu peints par Michel-Ange dans la chapelle Sixtine. À ne pas faire : deux patineurs main dans la main en plein numéro. À faire : Jackson Pollock en train de verser de la peinture sur une toile. À ne pas faire : un calligraphe qui peint avec trois pinceaux dans chaque main et deux dans la bouche. Cette série est troublante pour le spectateur qui saisit inconsciemment pourquoi telle image a été “approuvée” (le génie de l’artiste macho) ou “rejetée” (le kitsch de certaines pratiques) : l'œuvre met le doigt sur les idées préconçues profondément enfouies dans notre inconscient. Guillemet nous fait rentrer dans son système de pensée pour nous laisser ensuite pris au piège de nos propres préjugés.

Si votre ramage se rapporte à votre plumage...

Contrairement à la série Dos and Don’ts qui joue sur le registre de la blague d'initié, Canary Shift (2005) s'attaque à une référence bien plus connue : la couleur. L'artiste expose un canari vivant et le nourrit de canthaxanthine (un pigment naturel que l'on trouve dans n'importe quelle animalerie, "les gens en achètent pour 'fignoler' les canaris de concours”, explique Guillemet). Mais à force de lui en donner, le plumage jaune de l'oiseau devient orange vif. L'animal se retrouve ainsi dépossédé de son attribut principal, le jaune. En effet, quoi de plus jaune qu'un canari ? Peinture canari, robe canari, cet oiseau symbolise l’essence même du jaune. Un canari orange est-il toujours un canari ? Que deviendrait la planète si tous les canaris étaient oranges ? Le fait que ce canari-là ait changé de plumage peut-il avoir d’autres conséquences ? “Ce n’est peut-être pas seulement le canari qui a changé, ajoute Guillemet, le monde entier pourrait avoir pris une autre teinte…”

Dans la série d'aquarelles Marines/Self-spoken (2009), l'artiste a peint de simples formes géométriques : des croix, des bandes, etc. L'encadrement et l'accrochage les placent très clairement dans la tradition de l'histoire de l'art, d'Alexandre Rodchenko à Sol LeWitt. Mais ces signes graphiques sont en fait tirés du code international des signaux maritimes que l'on utilise en mer pour communiquer avec les autres navires. Le drapeau, ou pour être exact le “pavillon”, qui représente une croix blanche sur fond bleu signifie “Mon navire est stoppé et n'a plus d'erre” et les deux bandes bleues horizontales : “Tenez vous à distance, j'ai un incendie à bord et j'ai une fuite de substances dangereuses.” Guillemet échappe ici aux éternels débats sur l'interprétation de l'œuvre d'art et nous présente des tableaux qui peuvent vraiment être déchiffrés.

Modernisme

La série Marines/Self-spoken, c'est aussi une pique contre l’engouement du monde de l'art pour le Modernisme. “Quatre-vingt-dix pour cent de la production artistique actuelle y fait référence”, explique Guillemet. “Quatre-vingts ans après, on est encore et toujours dans le commentaire, on n’a pas trouvé mieux.” Ses commentaires à lui, Guillemet les charge d'une bonne dose d'humour en utilisant avec ironie l'iconographie héritée de ce grand “isme”. Dans la série Monochromes for a better world (2009-2010), des drapeaux grandeur nature ont été suspendus à une hampe et fixés au mur, comme des drapeaux officiels. Ils ont tous été colorés avec des produits médicaux. Les teintes vives du drapeau rouge, symbole de l'utopie par excellence, ont été par exemple obtenues grâce à de l'éosine, un antiseptique courant utilisé pour désinfecter les plaies, soigner les boutons de varicelle et les érythèmes fessiers des bébés. "J’aime m’amuser un peu avec les grandes idées du Modernisme”, dit l'artiste. Après tout, l'éosine contribue réellement à un monde meilleur, et le drapeau rouge revisité par Guillemet échappe à toutes les associations qu'il provoque.

Ces tensions et décalages entre l'apparence d'un objet et sa réalité sont au cœur du travail de Guillemet. Dans la série de photographies Diseased Chairs (2008-2009), l'artiste a transformé plusieurs fois la même chaise : la chaise style bande dessinée avec des autocollants ronds et blancs collés comme des trous de gruyère, la chaise bavant des dessins de gouttes, etc. Quoi de plus banal qu’une chaise ? On s’y assoit pour se reposer, manger, travailler. Dans son poème Les Assis (1871), Arthur Rimbaud décrit la chaise comme un symbole bourgeois et analyse la position assise comme un acte de résignation. Ici, Guillemet s'attaque à sa propre chaise d'atelier. Il se prive de toute promesse de confort, se force à abandonner son soutien, dans une démarche qui pourrait être une bonne métaphore de la recherche artistique. Dans cette pièce, l’artiste ne cherche pas à cacher les petites astuces visuelles qu'il utilise (papiers, autocollants), et ce sont bien ces truquages non dissimulés qui font que l’œuvre fonctionne. L’artiste ne prétend pas changer cette chaise, il nous invite simplement à la regarder différemment, ne serait-ce que pour quelques minutes. “Je pense souvent à cette expression anglaise: si ça ressemble à un canard, nage comme un canard et fait coin-coin comme un canard, c'est certainement un canard. Mon travail en tant qu'artiste, c’est de montrer que ce n’est pas seulement un putain de canard!”

Coline Milliard est corédactrice de Catalogue.

IMAGE CREDITS

Colin Guillemet, Around the world, 2009 Globe and various international mains adaptors Dimensions variable

Colin Guillemet, Do/Don’t (ongoing series) Michelangelo, 2003 Dimensions variable

Colin Guillemet, Do/Don’t (ongoing series) Pollock, 2008 Dimensions variable

Colin Guillemet, Canari Shift, 2005 Canary bird, cage, laced bird seeds Installation view Wäinö Aaltonen Museum, Turku, Finland

Colin Guillemet, Marines (ongoing series) I am dragging my anchor (yellow/red), 2009 Watercolour on paper and text 50 x 40 cm

Colin Guillemet, Marines (ongoing series) Watercolour on paper and text

Colin Guillemet, Monochromes for a better world (ongoing series) Eosine Flag, 2009 Mixed media 220 x 160 cm

Colin Guillemet, Diseased Chairs, 2008-10 Bump Chair, 2008 7 ink-jet prints, framed 127 x 85 cm

Colin Guillemet, Diseased Chairs, 2008-10 7 ink-jet prints, framed 127 x 85 cm

 
advertisement advertisement advertisement