artwork image
artwork image
artwork image
artwork image
artwork image

English

Poetics of Space à la Moth of Saint-Ouen

Caroline Hancock

Portrait of the artist Charlotte Moth as a nomad.

Once upon a time, Charlotte Moth lived in various parts of the South of England, where she developed a certain expertise in the seaside resorts along the South-East coast from Brighton to Eastbourne, Bexhill-on-Sea to Whitstable, Dover to Deal, Ramsgate to Margate. Her terrain was the exotics of Sussex and Kent. WG Sebald and Michael Bracewell, but also Martin Parr and Bill Brandt come to mind and set the scene. This is arguably where her Travelogue, an ongoing series of analogue photographs, was born. There, in the land of disco balls, ice cream cones, multicoloured balloons and sequined curtains, she tuned her eye to modernist and pseudo-modernist architecture, indoor and outdoor leisure-time design. Moth’s interests lie in vernacular as well as grand architecture or the spaces in between. Industrial, urban, quaint, kitsch, quirky or defiantly boring, her subjects are timeless spaces of everyday banality. They are gloriously passé, out of season, out of synch with reality, dysfunctional and transitory – ever threatened by sudden gusts of change. To this day, wherever she goes, she marvels at the ‘Donald Judd-like ceilings’ she spots in hotel dining rooms or the lobbies of apartment blocks.

England

London called and sculpture was her topic at the Slade School of Art. Constructivism, brutalism, minimalism and conceptualism inform her aesthetic, and hence formalist, sensibility. Considering the politics of display, presentation and re-presentation (and associated terminology), she questions possible relations between photography and sculpture and roots her practice in the tradition of site specificity and the ephemeral play with the language of signs. Carl Andre, Alighiero Boetti, Lygia Clark, Michael Asher, Daniel Buren, David Lamelas, Hollis Frampton are some artists that she admires.

A Canon A-1 camera accompanies her every move as she starts to develop the Travelogue, on a par with Tacita Dean’s collections of postcards. Moth shares with Dean an obsessive dedication to the refined capacities of analogue technology and a slightly nostalgic take on British peculiarities. Her constant dialogue since the 1990s with artist-collector extraordinaire, Peter Fillingham, materialises in their library, an ever-growing collaborative work, engaging with the potential significance of an archive (yet to have a public outing). Moth is, for instance, a declared admirer of art historian Aby Warburg’s achievements and rigorous methodology. Attentiveness to the printed medium and documentation filters into Moth’s approach to publications.

Holland

Moth then moved to Maastricht to research at the Jan van Eyck Academie, where her overall project was fine-tuned and took an international turn. She explains the photographic backbone of her practice thus: ‘Travelogue is an organic thought process, a collage.’ This pool of images adapts to each context, finding expression in situ. It is edited, externalised, made manifest. Moth sometimes invites other voices and narratives to engage with these images – like those of Maeve Connolly and Sadie Murdoch in Paris recently. She composes with plinths, plants, light, slide projections, photographs and curtains to highlight the poetics of space and enhance its experience. Indeed Gaston Bachelard’s 1958 La Poétique de l’espace (Poetics of Space) features high on her reading list. On occasion, such environments become the subject of a new work – a photograph of a different kind, the documentation of an ephemeral occurrence becomes art.

Expanded Field

During her time in Holland, her collaborative projects with Falke Pisano, under the umbrella name of falkeandcharlotte, were curatorial in nature. Ellen de Bruijne offered them the Dolores project space of her gallery in Amsterdam for six months; they launched invitations to other artists, encounters in space and time. Charlotte Moth subsequently enrolled in a number of residency programmes which enabled her to exponentially expand her source material in places that range from Los Angeles, Tokyo, Galway, Stuttgart or Corsica, and so the list will continue. The specifics of location don’t find an outlet in her work – anonymity, commonality and universality are essential to her serialised proposals. Yet this neutrality or levelling allows for any manner of personal interpretation.

Now, Paris is her elected living quarter. More specifically and suitably, she is based in Saint-Ouen, the Northern suburb of Paris where the Surrealists André Breton and Alberto Giacometti famously delighted in the flea market during the late-1920s. It seems appropriate to picture Moth following the mode of objective chance in such places not dissimilar to the car boot sales or antique stores she reports having frequented so assiduously in the UK. She raves about her encounters with Le Corbusier and Mallet-Stevens as much as with illustrious unknowns in the back streets here, there and everywhere. Envisaging herself and the Travelogue as fundamentally itinerant, the fact that André Cadere is amongst her heroes comes as no surprise. Moth’s explorations of space give current resonance to Cadere’s artistic activity.

IMAGE CREDITS

All images:
Charlotte Moth, Travelogue, 2010
Courtesy of the artist and Marcelle Alix, Paris

Français

Poétique de l'espace à la Moth de Saint-Ouen

Caroline Hancock

Portrait de l'artiste Charlotte Moth en nomade.

Il était une fois Charlotte Moth, une jeune artiste partie à l'aventure au sud de l'Angleterre pour y développer une certaine expertise des stations balnéaires. D'une ville à l'autre du sud-est, Moth longe la côte de Brighton à Eastbourne, de Bexhill-on-Sea à Whitstable, de Douvres à Deal et de Ramsgate à Margate. L’exotisme du Sussex et du Kent n'ont plus de secret pour elle. L’univers de W.G. Sebald, Michael Bracewell, Martin Parr et Bill Brandt n’est jamais très loin non plus. C'est sans doute à ce moment là que Moth commence son Travelogue, une série en cours de photographies argentiques. Au pays des boules disco, des cornets de glace, ballons multicolores et rideaux à paillettes, son regard se porte sur l'architecture moderniste (voire pseudo-moderniste) et le mobilier de loisir. Elle s'intéresse autant aux constructions vernaculaires qu'à la grande architecture et à ce qui existe entre les deux. Qu'ils soient industriels, urbains, pittoresques, excentriques ou carrément ennuyeux, les lieux qui attirent son attention sont de nature atemporelle. Ils portent en eux la gloire d'un passé révolu : hors du temps et hors d'usage, ils sont en décalage total avec la réalité. Ces constructions temporaires sont d'une banalité quotidienne, sans cesse menacées par les constants changements de mode. Où qu'elle aille, Moth s'émerveille devant les "plafonds à la Donald Judd" qu'elle repère dans le restaurant d'un hôtel ou à l'entrée d'une tour d'immeubles.

Angleterre

Londres l'appelle et Moth choisit d'étudier la sculpture à la Slade School of Art. Constructivisme, brutalisme, minimalisme et conceptualisme nourrissent sa sensibilité esthétique et ses affinités formelles. Consciente des enjeux de l'exposition, de la présentation et re-présentation de l'art, Moth interroge ces notions en creusant les possibles liens entre photographie et sculpture. Elle place les origines de son travail dans la tradition des œuvres in situ qui prennent en charge la spécificité d'un espace et s'intéresse à l'instabilité des signes et du langage. Parmi ses grandes admirations, Carl Andre, Alighiero Boetti, Lygia Clark, Michael Asher, Daniel Buren, David Lamelas et Hollis Frampton.

Son appareil photo Canon A-1 accompagne le moindre de ses déplacements dès les débuts de son Travelogue que l'on pourrait comparer aux collections de cartes postales de Tacita Dean. Moth et Dean partagent une attirance obsessionnelle pour les finesses de l'argentique et une nostalgie insatiable pour les curiosités venues d'Angleterre. Depuis les années 1990, sa collaboration avec l'extraordinaire collectionneur et artiste Peter Fillingham a pris la forme d'un répertoire en constante évolution, une possible archive en devenir (qui n'a pas encore été montrée en public). Moth est d'ailleurs une admiratrice invétérée de l'œuvre de l'historien de l'art Aby Warburg et de sa rigoureuse méthodologie. Son rapport à l'édition n'est pas sans lien avec son attachement au support imprimé et à la documentation.

Hollande

Moth déménage ensuite à Maastricht pour une résidence à la Jan van Eyck Academie : ses recherches se précisent et prennent un tournant international. Elle explique la base de sa pratique photographique ainsi : "Travelogue est un processus de pensée organique, un collage." Cette banque d'images s'adapte à chaque contexte et trouve son expression in situ en s'affirmant par le biais du montage. Moth invite parfois d'autres voix, d'autres récits à venir interagir avec ces images, c'est le cas de Maeve Connolly et Sadie Murdoch récemment à Paris. Socles, plantes, lumières, projections de diapositives, photographies et rideaux, Moth développe sa poétique de l'espace et accentue l'expérience de celui-ci. Ce n’est pas un hasard si La Poétique de l’espace (1958) de Gaston Bachelard figure parmi ses lectures privilégiées. Ces environnements deviennent parfois le sujet d'une nouvelle œuvre, une photographie d'un genre nouveau : la documentation d'un événement éphémère se transforme en art.

Élargir le champ

Pendant son séjour en Hollande, elle collabore avec l'artiste Falke Pisano sous le nom de falkeandcharlotte. Ce projet de nature plutôt curatoriale s'installe pendant six mois dans l'espace de la galerie Dolores project à Amsterdam, mis à disposition par Ellen de Bruijne. Elles invitent d'autres artistes, provoquent des rencontres dans le temps et l'espace. Moth fait ensuite plusieurs résidences qui lui permettent d'élargir ses sources de façon exponentielle : Los Angeles, Tokyo, Galway, Stuttgart, la Corse, la liste est longue. Son travail, souvent en série, ne cherche pas tant à révéler la spécificité d'un lieu mais à privilégier l'anonymat, la standardisation et l'universalité ; ce qui n'empêche pas à ses photographies souvent neutres et objectives de faire émerger une forme d'interprétation subjective.

Moth vit désormais à Paris, ou plutôt à Saint-Ouen dans la banlieue nord de Paris, là où à la fin des années 1920, les surréalistes André Breton et Alberto Giacometti passent leur temps dans le célèbre marché aux puces de la ville. On imagine aisément Moth flâner au hasard dans les vides greniers et autres antiquaires qu'elle avait l'habitude de fréquenter en Angleterre. Elle divague sur de possibles rencontres avec Le Corbusier et Mallet-Stevens aussi bien qu'avec d'illustres inconnus dans les rues lointaines, là-bas ou ici, partout. Le Travelogue s'envisage alors comme une œuvre fondamentalement nomade. Il n'est pas surprenant qu'André Cadere figure parmi ses héros. D'une certaine manière, les explorations de Moth donnent une résonance actuelle à son art.

IMAGE CREDITS

All images:
Charlotte Moth, Travelogue, 2010
Courtesy of the artist and Marcelle Alix, Paris

 
advertisement advertisement advertisement