artwork image
artwork image
artwork image
artwork image
artwork image
artwork image
artwork image
artwork image
artwork image

English

Barbara Kruger

Who’s Looking at Who?

Coline Milliard

Barbara Kruger on the importance of doubt, and why she isn’t a political artist.

Catalogue: In Love for Sale, Kate Linker summed up your practice with three words: ‘seduce, dislocate and deter’. Do you still recognise your work in these words?

Barbara Kruger: Yes, I do, I’m interested in the power of visuality to address certain issues and ideas. And in doing so, I try to use doubt to raise other possibilities. In my recent installation at the Lever House in New York, I used the text: ‘doubt + belief = sanity’. Without ‘doubt’, this world could be an incredibly oppressing place. For us coming out of eight years of George Bush, it’s especially true – in those years doubt would have been grounds for arrest – but doubt has always been crucial. I did an installation in New York in 1994 which said things like: ‘Think like us, talk like us, believe like us, look like us.’ These texts and images covered the walls, floors and ceilings and were accompanied by an audio track with people cheering, praying, laughing and crying. When I redid the work in Switzerland four or five years ago, someone asked me: ‘Is that your response to 9/11?’ People think that the issues of doubt, power, control, dominance and belief are new but they’ve been ongoing since probably the beginning of time! Who’s looking at who? Who has the power? Who has the speech? All this has been part of my work for years.

C: People tend to read works in relation to their current context …

B.K: Hopefully that’s true, because unfortunately these issues of subjugation and surveillance follow us. Today’s omnipresent exposure, voyeurism and narcissism are just so much part of the way people live their lives. People feel the need to have a camera on them all the time, or expect that everyone wants to know what they are doing at that moment. And yet in many ways – and I’ve always felt this, especially when Bush was president – the fact that so many people spend their time saying ‘What’s up?’, ‘What’s going on?’ but on a big-picture level don’t know or care about the answers to those questions is perfect for the powers-that-be. There is no contesting of the structures of control, just compliance with them. I’m not saying that in a judgmental way, it’s more observational, I’m part of that world too.

“Categories are the kind of enclosures that marginalise and limit the production of meaning.”

C: You seem to have an ambivalent position towards the notion of politics in art. You’ve always been clearly very committed to feminism and other issues such as the manipulation of collective consciousness through language, but you’ve also said ‘I don’t make political art’.

B.K: I resist categories. Categories are the kind of enclosures that marginalise and limit the production of meaning. I try to make work about how we are to one another, how we speak to one another, how we touch one another, what we do for and against one another. All art to me is a kind of commentary, either literal or incredibly abstract and distanced, whether it’s film, or a piece of visual art, or a novel or a song – it’s all commentary about what it means to take another breath, to live another day. Within that ‘how we are to one another’ is what some people might call ‘politics', but to label something ‘political art’ or ‘feminist art’ or ‘black art’ or ‘queer art’ to me is a limiting device. Unlike in New York forty years ago, when the art subculture consisted of twelve white guys, a great thing about today’s art subculture is that there are all sorts of different people showing and telling stuff which becomes art. All those stories make up different subjectivities, different power positions. The need to break that down and say: ‘this is political’ or ‘this is feminist’ is really lazy and unproductive. It’s exactly the same with decades, the so-called ‘80s, ‘70s, ‘60s. That’s not the way history really works, it’s much more plural than that, but for a lot of curators and journalists that’s just an easy way. People need buzzwords.

C: You’ve also actively worked against the idea of ‘greatness’.

B.K: Yes, I curated this show at the Museum of Modern Art many years ago called Picturing Greatness (1988) which was a critical look at the construction of artistic ‘greatness’. My colleagues in New York at the time, Cindy [Sherman], Jenny [Holzer], Sherrie Levine, Louise Lawler, Sarah Charlesworth, and Laurie Simmons really had a critical relation to that notion of greatness, but it was a systemic critique, not substitutional. It wasn’t ‘this sucks because I don’t get everything’, it was more like: ‘this is problematic, and change could be productive.’

“No work is ever as extraordinary, major and masterful, or as damaged, failed and minor as it’s written to be.”

C: Many other people, maybe most famously Linda Nochlin, have attacked this myth of greatness, and yet it still feels very present.

B.K: People need it, the market needs it to inflate values, many curators need it. It’s just part of the career description. It’s important for artists to be appreciated and their work to be known, but why the hyperbole? No work is ever as extraordinary, major and masterful, or as damaged, failed and minor as it’s written to be. Everything is always praised or damned with such extremities, and that’s all the discourse of taste. I’m not saying that there can’t be judgment. I tend to look at art subcultures as an anthropology.

C: Can you tell us about your Sprüth Magers exhibition?

B.K: The works that I’m showing there were produced between 1981 and 1985 and are pre-digital paste-ups. I work digitally now, but these are the paste-ups that I made and enlarged to make my early pieces. It was the same technique I used when I worked as a graphic designer at Mademoiselle. It’s interesting in terms of scale, because people think of my work as large, but actually, these images are very small, page-size and smaller. My practice has changed tremendously since these early works, and for the last two decades I’ve been doing installations of image and text that spatialise my work through the use of video, audio and wall and floor coverings. I showed the installation Pleasure, Pain, Desire, Disgust (1997) at the South London Gallery in 2001 and my four-channel video piece Twelve (2004) was included Iwona Blazwick’s Short History of Performance exhibition at the Whitechapel in 2006.

C: How did you start making film?

B.K: I’m really not ‘making film’. I’m just extending my interest in direct address from the still to the moving image. The notion of direct address, whether it’s through pronouns, eye contact, or positioning the viewer, has threaded through my practice from the start. At the beginning, all I could afford to do was small black and white collages. Videos have allowed me to really spatialise the work and engage space as both a positioner and container of the body. My first videos were spots for MTV, the Silence the Violence spots in 1993, and then I did some Public Service Announcements (1996) at the Wexner Center in Ohio and from that, I started doing more videos. The first big one was Pleasure, Pain, Desire, Disgust, shown at Deitch Projects in New York in 1997. More recently, I’ve done outdoor videos in Los Angeles and in New York, and I’m now shooting a new piece which I hope to show next year.

C: Your development towards video seems to follow society’s own growing obsession with the filmic media.

B.K: I actually don’t think that society is obsessed with film. I think that digital technology has changed the way we send and receive information. Film actually is beginning to seem like an anachronism. It’s the moving image and the shortened text which seem to engage people. In many ways the protracted narratives of film are a challenge to today’s shortened attention spans. I started to write about film and video for Artforum around 1981. I didn’t write about art, I thought I understood more about the moving image. It’s just what I grew up with as a kid in Newark, New Jersey. In my family, we didn’t talk about art, but we did watch television and go to the movies.

Barbara Kruger
21/11/2009 - 23/01/2010
Sprüth Magers Gallery
London, UK
http://spruethmagers.net

IMAGE CREDITS

Barbara Kruger, Installation at the Lever House, New York City, 2009, Photo credit: Jesse Harris

Barbara Kruger, Installation at the Lever House, New York City, 2009, Photo credit: Jesse Harris

Barbara Kruger, Installation at the Gallery of Modern Art, GoMA, Glasgow, 2005

Barbara Kruger, Kaufhof Department Store, Frankfurt, 2003 (part of the Shopping exhibition at the Schirn Kunsthalle)

Barbara Kruger, Twelve, 4 simultaneous video projections. 15 min, 2004

Barbara Kruger, Twelve, 4 simultaneous video projections. 15 min, 2004

Barbara Kruger, Untitled (Your Misery Loves Company), Collage, 1985

Barbara Kruger, Untitled (Now You See Us, Now You Don't), Collage, 1983

Barbara Kruger, Untitled (You Are a Very Special Person), Collage, 1995

All images: courtesy of the artist and Sprüth Magers Berlin London

Français

Barbara Kruger

Qui regarde qui?

Coline Milliard

Barbara Kruger ne se considère pas comme une artiste politique. Le doute compte avant tout.

Catalogue : Dans Love for Sale, Kate Linker résume votre travail en trois mots : “Séduire, désarticuler, dissuader”. Êtes-vous toujours d'accord?

Barbara Kruger : Tout à fait. Je m'intéresse à l’efficacité avec laquelle l’image peut aborder certains sujet et j'utilise le doute pour essayer de remettre en question ce système. Dans une récente installation à la Lever House à New York, j'ai écrit: “doute + croyance = raison”.1 Sans le doute, le monde serait terriblement oppressant. Pendant la présidence de George Bush, le moindre doute pouvait vous mener tout droit en prison! Au-delà de ce contexte, la question du doute a toujours été centrale. En 1994, j’ai réalisé une installation à New York où l’on pouvait lire : “Pensez comme nous, parlez comme nous, croyez comme nous, ressemblez-nous”.2 Le texte et les images recouvraient murs, sol et plafond et on entendait une bande sonore avec des gens qui applaudissaient, priaient, riaient et pleuraient. Il y a quatre ou cinq ans, j'ai refait cette œuvre en Suisse et quelqu'un m'a demandé si c'était ma réponse au 11 septembre. Les gens pensent que les questions de doute, pouvoir, contrôle, domination et croyance sont récentes, mais elles existent depuis la nuit des temps! Qui regarde qui? Qui a le pouvoir? Qui a la parole? Tout cela fait partie de mon travail depuis des années.

C : Les gens ont tendance à voir les œuvres en relation avec le temps présent…

B.K : J'espère que vous avez raison, parce que malheureusement ces histoires d’emprise et de surveillance nous poursuivent. Aujourd'hui, le voyeurisme, l'exhibitionnisme et le narcissisme sont omniprésents, ils font partie du quotidien. Les gens ressentent le besoin de porter un appareil photo sur eux en permanence et ils pensent que tout le monde a envie de savoir ce qu'ils font du matin au soir. J'ai toujours pensé, surtout quand Bush était au pouvoir, que si tant de gens passaient leur temps à dire "Quoi de neuf?" sans se soucier de la réponse, c'était du pain béni pour les autorités. Il n’y a pas de contestation mais une soumission aux organes de pouvoir. Notez bien que je ne juge pas, je ne fais que constater, je suis tout à fait consciente que je fais moi aussi partie de ce système.

“Les catégories enferment, marginalisent et limitent la pensée.”

C : Votre position sur l'art et la politique est assez ambivalente. Vous vous êtes très clairement engagée dans le féminisme et avez dénoncé le langage comme outil de manipulation. Par contre, vous avez aussi dit que votre travail n'était pas politique…

B.K : Je me méfie des catégories. Elles enferment, marginalisent et limitent la pensée. J'essaie de faire des œuvres sur la manière dont nous vivons ensemble, la manière dont on se parle, se touche, s'affronte. Pour moi, toute forme d'art est un commentaire, qu'il soit littéral, abstrait ou détaché, que ce soit un film, une œuvre d'art plastique, un roman ou une chanson. Ils commentent le sens même de l'existence. Au sein de ces interactions, il y a ce que certains nomment la “politique”, mais faire des catégories comme “art politique”, “art féministe”, “art noir” ou “art queer” limite vraiment les choses. Contrairement à la culture underground new-yorkaise des années 1960 où la scène artistique se résumait à une douzaine de types blancs, je trouve formidable qu'aujourd'hui des gens très différents soient artistes et exposent. Toutes ces histoires constituent différentes subjectivités, différentes positions de pouvoir. Le besoin de faire des catégories est non seulement paresseux, mais aussi totalement improductif. Même chose pour les décennies, les soi-disant années 1980, 1970, 1960… ce n'est pas comme ça que fonctionne l'histoire, c'est bien plus complexe. Beaucoup de commissaires ou journalistes optent pour la facilité, les gens ont besoin d'étiquettes.

C : Vous vous êtes aussi activement opposée à l'idée du “grand artiste”.

B.K : Oui, j'ai organisé une exposition au Musée d'Art Moderne de New York il y a quelques années qui s'intitulait Picturing Greatness (1988). Elle portait un regard critique sur l'idée du “grand artiste”. À l'époque, mes amies new-yorkaises, Cindy [Sherman], Jenny [Holzer], Sherrie Levine, Louise Lawler, Sarah Charlesworth et Laurie Simmons s'y opposaient fermement, on ne se contentait pas de vouloir mieux, c'est le système entier que nous remettions en cause. On ne se disait pas “Y'en a marre de pas tout avoir” mais plutôt “Ceci pose problème, changeons-le.”

“Écrire qu'une œuvre est extraordinaire, majeure, que c'est un chef d'œuvre ou bien qu'elle est dépassée, défaillante ou mineure ne veut rien dire.”

C : De nombreux critiques, et notamment Linda Nochlin, ont attaqué ce mythe du “ grand artiste”. Comment expliquer qu'il soit encore si présent?

B.K : Les gens ont en besoin, le marché en a besoin pour augmenter la valeur des choses, les commissaires aussi ; ça fait partie du curriculum. C'est important que les artistes soient appréciés et que leur travail soit connu mais pourquoi tant d'hyperboles? Écrire qu'une œuvre est extraordinaire, majeure, que c'est un chef d'œuvre ou bien qu'elle est dépassée, défaillante ou mineure ne veut rien dire. On célèbre et on insulte en passant d'un extrême à l'autre, c'est comme ça que fonctionne la critique d'art. Je ne dis pas qu’on n’a pas le droit de juger mais j'ai tendance à regarder l’art en anthropologue.

C : Pourriez-vous dire quelques mots sur votre exposition à la galerie Sprüth Magers?

B.K : Ce sont des œuvres réalisées entre 1981 et 1985. Aujourd'hui je travaille avec le numérique mais ces affiches sont celles que j’ai découpées, collées et agrandies pour réaliser mes premières pièces. J'utilisais la même technique quand j'étais graphiste pour Mademoiselle. Les questions d'échelles m'intéressent dans cette série. Les gens pensent que mes œuvres sont de grands formats mais en réalité, ces images sont toutes petites, de la taille d'une page, parfois moins. Mon travail a beaucoup évolué. Je fais des installations depuis vingt ans avec des images et du texte que je mets en espace du sol au plafond avec de la vidéo, du son. J'ai montré l'installation Pleasure, Pain, Desire, Disgust (1997) à la South London Gallery en 2001 et Iwona Blazwick a exposé les quatre projections de la vidéo Twelve (2004) dans l'exposition Short History of Performance à la Whitechapel en 2006.

C : Comment en êtes-vous venu à faire des films?

B.K : Je ne “fais” pas vraiment de films. Je n’ai fait que déplacer mon intérêt pour la communication de l'image fixe à l'image en mouvement. La notion d'adresse directe est le fil conducteur de mon travail depuis le départ, que ce soit au travers des pronoms, du regard ou de la position du spectateur. Au début, je pouvais seulement me permettre de petits collages en noir et blanc. La vidéo m'a permise de mettre mon travail en espace afin d’y repenser la place et la position du corps. Mes premières vidéos étaient des spots pour MTV, Silence the Violence en 1993, puis j'ai fait Public Service Announcements (1996) au Wexner Center dans l'Ohio. C'est à partir de là que je me suis vraiment mise à la vidéo. La première grande pièce est Pleasure, Pain, Desire, Disgust montrée à Deitch Projects à New York en 1997. Récemment, j'ai réalisé des vidéos en extérieur à Los Angeles et New York. J'en prépare une nouvelle en ce moment même que j'espère exposer l'année prochaine.

C : Votre pratique de la vidéo semble accompagner le succès croissant du film auprès du public.

B.K: Je ne pense pas que la société soit obsédée par le film. La technologie numérique a changé la façon dont nous envoyons et recevons des informations. En fait, le film est presque un anachronisme. C'est l'image en mouvement et la diminution du texte que les gens semblent chercher. Les longs films narratifs ont aujourd'hui du mal à retenir notre attention, on s'impatiente de plus en plus vite. J'ai commencé à écrire sur le film et la vidéo dans Artforum vers 1981. Je ne parlais pas d'arts plastiques car je pensais mieux comprendre l'image en mouvement. J'ai grandi à Newark dans le New Jersey et dans ma famille, on ne parlait pas d'art, on regardait la télévision et on allait au cinéma.

Barbara Kruger
21/11/2009 - 23/01/2010
Sprüth Magers Gallery
Londres, Grande Bretagne
http://spruethmagers.net

1] “doubt + belief = sanity”

2] “Think like us, talk like us, believe like us, look like us.”

IMAGE CREDITS

Barbara Kruger, Installation at the Lever House, New York City, 2009, Photo credit: Jesse Harris

Barbara Kruger, Installation at the Lever House, New York City, 2009, Photo credit: Jesse Harris

Barbara Kruger, Installation at the Gallery of Modern Art, GoMA, Glasgow, 2005

Barbara Kruger, Kaufhof Department Store, Frankfurt, 2003 (part of the Shopping exhibition at the Schirn Kunsthalle)

Barbara Kruger, Twelve, 4 simultaneous video projections. 15 min, 2004

Barbara Kruger, Twelve, 4 simultaneous video projections. 15 min, 2004

Barbara Kruger, Untitled (Your Misery Loves Company), Collage, 1985

Barbara Kruger, Untitled (Now You See Us, Now You Don't), Collage, 1983

Barbara Kruger, Untitled (You Are a Very Special Person), Collage, 1995

All images: courtesy of the artist and Sprüth Magers Berlin London

 
advertisement advertisement advertisement